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Mactan–Cebu International Airport

Mactan–Cebu International Airport (Cebuano: Tugpahanang Pangkalibutan sa Mactan–Sugbo, Filipino: Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Mactan–Cebu) (IATA: CEB, ICAO: RPVM) located in Central Visayas region, is the second busiest international airport in the Philippines that serves Cebu City and its metropolitan area as well as the Central Visayas.[2] It is located in Lapu-Lapu City on Mactan Island, a part of Metro Cebu. The airport is managed by the Mactan–Cebu International Airport Authority. It is the world’s first resort airport and is one of the two main hubs of Cebu Pacific and Pan Pacific Airlines. It covers an area of 797 hectares (1,970 acres).

Mactan–Cebu International Airport

Tugpahanang Pangkalibutan sa Mactan–Sugbo
Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Mactan–Cebu
Mactan Cebu Airport Logo.png
MCIA Terminal 2 from Apron.jpg
Exterior of Terminal 2 and air traffic control tower from apron
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerMactan-Cebu International Airport Authority
OperatorGMR-Megawide Cebu Airport Corporation
ServesMetro Cebu and Central Visayas
LocationLapu-Lapu Airport Road, Barangay Ibo, Lapu-Lapu City, Metro Cebu, Central Visayas
Hub for
Built1956
Elevation AMSL9 m / 31 ft
Coordinates10°18′26″N 123°58′44″E / 10.30722°N 123.97889°E / 10.30722; 123.97889Coordinates: 10°18′26″N 123°58′44″E / 10.30722°N 123.97889°E / 10.30722; 123.97889
Websitewww.mactancebuairport.com
Map
CEB/RPVM is located in Philippines
CEB/RPVM
CEB/RPVM
Location in the Philippines
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
04/22 3,300 10,827 Asphalt
Statistics (2018)
Passengers11,377,887
Increase 13.20%
Aircraft movements100,449
Increase 16.29%
Cargo (in kg)82,057,840
Increase 11.92%
Source: MCIAA[1]

It has a single 3,300-meter (10,800 ft) runway that was built by the United States in 1956 as an emergency airport for Strategic Air Command bombers and was known as the Mactan Air Base.[3] The runway is complemented by a full-length taxiway that it shares with the current Mactan Air Base of the Philippine Air Force.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The runway was built by the United States Air Force in 1956 as an emergency airport for Strategic Air Command bombers and it was known as the Mactan Air Base.[3] It remained a spartan outpost until the Vietnam War in the 1960s when it became a base for a C-130 unit of the U.S. Air Force.[3]

In the mid-1960s, the civilian airport was opened, to replace the Lahug Airport (now the site of Cebu IT Park), which could no longer be expanded due to safety and physical problems. The airport was later expanded to the current Mactan–Cebu International Airport (MCIA).

On August 20, 2008, the Mactan–Cebu International Airport Authority (MCIAA) announced that about 300 million Philippine pesos will be spent for the terminal expansion program to address the increasing volume of passenger traffic. MCIAA former general manager Danilo Augusto Francia said the program also includes the establishment of a second passenger terminal in the Mactan–Cebu International Airport.[4] In 2009, former general manager Francia announced for the public bidding for the construction of the new generation terminal to service only international flights.

In 2010, the newly elected Philippine President, Benigno Aquino III selected Nigel Paul Villarete as the new General Manager of the Mactan–Cebu International Airport (MCIA)[5] and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of MCIAA. Mr. Villarete prioritized the completion of the terminal expansion[6] and the completion of the unfinished administration building.[7]

Following Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda), one of the biggest typhoons ever recorded and one of the most destructive typhoons in the Philippines, the airport was used as a center for air operations for the relief effort. The airport is centrally located in the Visayas which was the region most affected by the storm, especially the Eastern Visayas islands of Leyte and Samar. The Cebu airport was relatively unaffected by the storm while the airports of the Eastern Visayas were unusable immediately after.

On November 12, 2013, the world's longest and heaviest aircraft, the Antonov An-225 Mriya, landed at MCIA from the Zagreb International Airport in Croatia for the first time in the Philippines to deliver a 180-ton replacement transformer from the Croatian energy company KONČAR to the First Gen Corporation's power plant in Batangas City. Officials of First Gen approached MCIAA General Manager Nigel Paul Villarete to allow the Antonov An-225 to utilize the airport for the transportation of their delivery after officials from Clark International Airport, the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Manila, and Subic Bay International Airport refused to allow the aircraft to utilize their airports.[8] According to First Gen President Francis Giles Puno, MCIA had been inspected by Antonov Airlines, the owner of the Antonov An-225 aircraft, as the most viable option for their aircraft, "after considering the combination of airport, onward land transport and sea freight."[9]

On April 23, 2014, the Department of Transportation and Communications awarded the operations and maintenance of MCIA to a consortium of the Philippine Megawide Construction Corporation and Bangalore-based GMR Infrastructure. The consortium won with a bid of ₱17.5 billion. MCIAA handed over the operations and maintenance of the airport to the private consortium on November 1, 2014.[10] In the first half of 2016, MCIA and GMCAC started the rehabilitation, renovation and expansion of Terminal 1 as Phase 1 of the project. The new terminal building was designed by Integrated Design Associates Ltd. (IDA)[11][12] On January 25, 2018, GMR–Megawide Cebu Airport Corporation (GMCAC) chief executive advisor Andrew Acquaah-Harrison announced that the new terminal building would be the MCIA Terminal 2[13] will start operations on July 1, 2018 and cater to international flights.[14]

On June 7, 2018, Terminal 2 was inaugurated by President Rodrigo Duterte.[15][16] On August 27, 2018, which is also National Heroes Day in the Philippines, President Duterte expressed support for renaming the airport after Mactan chieftain Lapu-Lapu whose forces killed Ferdinand Magellan during the Battle of Mactan in 1521.[17]

Future developmentEdit

 
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte takes a tour inside the new inaugurated MCIA Terminal 2

On 22 May 2017, Mactan–Cebu International Airport Authority (MCIAA) passed a resolution approving the proposal to start the construction of a second runway, which was proposed by Rep. Raul Del Mar of Cebu. Del Mar proposed that the construction of the second runway be funded using P4.9- billion sourced from the P14.4 billion premium given by the GMCAC when it won the bid to develop and manage the MCIA terminal. Once completed, the second runway will be adjacent to the existing first runway and will enable simultaneous runway operations.[18]

TerminalsEdit

Terminal 1Edit

Terminal 1, which was built in 1990, serves as the airport's domestic terminal. Prior to the completion and opening of Terminal 2, it housed both domestic and international operations and has an annual capacity of 4.5 million passengers. By the end of 2017, it served more than 10 million passengers.[19]

The terminal has six boarding bridges and also has remote parking spaces for aircraft.

Terminal 2Edit

Terminal 2, which started construction in 2016 and opened for operations on July 1, 2018, is the newest airport terminal and has increased the capacity of the airport to 12.5 million passengers per year.[20] It currently handles all international flights. The design of the terminal has timber arches that look like an inverted boat hull, and a wave-like roof that evokes a tropical and resort-like feel. It represents the sea waves that surrounds the island of Cebu.

The new terminal building has five boarding bridges, two of which are expandable, thus making a total of seven boarding bridges.

Airlines and destinationsEdit

 
A Boeing 777F operated by Emirates SkyCargo at the airport with relief goods for Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda donated by the United Kingdom's Department for International Development

The airport flies to 25 domestic destinations and 22 international ones.

 
SilkAir's A320-200 landing.

PassengerEdit

AirlinesDestinations
Air BusanBusan
Air JuanBantayan, Catbalogan, Maasin, Naval, Sipalay, Siquijor, Tagbilaran
AirSWIFTEl Nido
Asiana AirlinesSeoul–Incheon
Cathay PacificHong Kong
Cebu PacificCaticlan, Cagayan de Oro, Clark, Davao, General Santos, Hong Kong, Iloilo, Kalibo, Macau, Manila, Puerto Princesa, Seoul–Incheon, Shanghai–Pudong, Singapore, Tokyo–Narita, Zamboanga
Cebu Pacific
operated by Cebgo
Bacolod, Busuanga, Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Calbayog, Camiguin, Caticlan, Dipolog, Dumaguete, Iloilo, Legazpi, Manila, Ozamiz, Pagadian, Siargao, Surigao, Tacloban, Zamboanga
China Eastern AirlinesShanghai–Pudong
China Southern AirlinesGuangzhou
EmiratesDubai–International1
EVA AirTaipei–Taoyuan
Jeju AirBusan, Muan, Seoul–Incheon
Jin AirBusan, Seoul–Incheon
Korean AirSeoul–Incheon
Lucky AirKunming
Pan Pacific AirlinesSeoul–Incheon
Philippine AirlinesBangkok–Suvarnabhumi, Clark, Davao, Manila, Nagoya–Centrair, Osaka–Kansai, Seoul–Incheon, Tokyo–Narita
Philippine Airlines
operated by PAL Express
Bacolod, Busuanga, Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Camiguin, Clark, Caticlan, Davao, General Santos, Iloilo, Kalibo, Legazpi, Manila, Ozamiz, Puerto Princesa, Siargao, Tacloban
Philippines AirAsiaCagayan De Oro, Caticlan, Clark, Davao, Kalibo, Kaohsiung (begins August 1, 2019),[21] Kuala Lumpur–International, Macau, Manila, Puerto Princesa, Seoul–Incheon, Shenzhen, Singapore, Taipei–Taoyuan
Royal Air PhilippinesCagayan de Oro, Caticlan, Davao, Manila, Puerto Princesa
Charter: Macau
ScootSingapore
Sichuan AirlinesChongqing
SilkAirSingapore2, Davao
T'way AirlinesDaegu
Tigerair Taiwan Taipei–Taoyuan
XiamenAir Chengdu (begins June 27, 2019),[22] Fuzhou, Xiamen

^Note 1 : Emirates flights continue on to Clark. However, the airline does not have eighth freedom traffic rights to transport passengers solely from Cebu to Clark.
^Note 2 : This flight makes an intermediate stop between Cebu and the listed destination. However, it has no rights to transport passengers solely between Cebu and the intermediate stop.

CargoEdit

AirlinesDestinations
FedEx Express Guangzhou
Tri-MG Intra Asia Airlines Hong Kong

StatisticsEdit

 
Terminal 1's departure waiting area.
 
Exterior of Terminal 1

Data from Mactan-Cebu International Airport Authority (MCIAA).[23]

Passenger movementsEdit

Year Domestic International Total Change
1991 1,401,671 57,988 1,459,659  
1992 1,592,173 97,842 1,690,015   15.78%
1993 1,635,779 172,966 1,808,745   7.03%
1994 1,714,104 244,602 1,958,706   8.29%
1995 1,841,904 307,203 2,149,107   9.72%
1996 2,047,966 354,818 2,402,784   11.80%
1997 2,331,431 387,190 2,718,621   13.14%
1998 1,759,141 312,663 2,071,804   23.79%
1999 1,912,107 384,047 2,296,154   10.83%
2000 1,889,114 403,735 2,292,849   0.14%
2001 1,855,363 397,370 2,252,733   1.75%
2002 1,709,259 425,957 2,135,216   5.22%
2003 1,850,453 422,329 2,272,782   6.44%
2004 2,033,556 578,206 2,611,762   14.91%
2005 2,106,380 672,284 2,778,664   6.39%
2006 2,291,952 778,210 3,070,162   10.49%
2007 2,765,523 965,977 3,731,500   21.54%
2008 2,997,161 994,089 3,991,250   6.96%
2009 3,841,990 920,913 4,762,903   19.33%
2010 4,206,651 1,206,801 5,413,452   13.66%
2011 4,748,333 1,467,613 6,215,946   14.82%
2012 5,257,941 1,513,377 6,771,318   8.93%
2013 5,369,929 1,626,183 6,996,112   3.32%
2014 5,160,109 1,679,740 6,839,849   2.23%
2015 5,769,104 2,012,135 7,781,239   13.76%
2016 6,334,283 2,436,355 8,770,638   12.72%
2017 6,904,978 3,145,962 10,050,940   14.60%
2018 7,611,398 3,766,489 11,377,887   13.20%

Aircraft movementsEdit

Year Domestic International Total Change
1991 22,495 786 23,281  
1992 22,638 919 23,557   1.19%
1993 18,401 1,508 19,909   15.49%
1994 18,191 2,109 20,300   1.96%
1995 18,854 2,565 21,419   5.51%
1996 21,136 3,079 24,215   13.05%
1997 23,537 3,398 26,935   11.23%
1998 18,281 3,022 21,303   20.91%
1999 21,936 3,986 25,922   21.68%
2000 20,691 3,509 24,200   6.64%
2001 24,304 4,140 28,444   17.54%
2002 24,366 3,601 27,967   1.68%
2003 24,488 3,886 28,374   1.46%
2004 23,837 4,261 28,098   0.97%
2005 22,444 4,653 27,097   3.56%
2006 22,128 5,621 27,749   2.41%
2007 24,004 7,373 31,377   13.07%
2008 27,205 7,619 34,824   10.99%
2009 37,328 7,011 44,339   27.32%
2010 39,470 7,907 47,377   6.85%
2011 44,300 9,509 53,809   13.58%
2012 49,242 9,646 58,888   9.44%
2013 53,954 10,991 64,945   10.29%
2014 44,651 11,630 56,281   13.34%
2015 48,850 13,363 62,213   10.54%
2016 55,804 15,739 71,543   15.00%
2017 65,310 21,070 86,380   20.74%
2018 75,010 25,439 100,449   16.29%

Cargo movementsEdit

Year Domestic (in kg) International (in kg) Total (in kg) Change
1991 22,704,044 577,966 23,282,010  
1992 24,157,026 1,914,630 26,071,656   11.98%
1993 28,782,759 739,662 29,522,421   13.24%
1994 35,487,442 1,106,365 36,593,807   23.95%
1995 34,094,876 6,837,271 40,932,147   11.86%
1996 38,506,657 10,862,813 49,369,470   20.61%
1997 40,635,709 12,082,148 52,717,857   6.78%
1998 28,087,092 18,598,134 46,685,226   11.44%
1999 26,458,875 19,189,755 45,648,630   2.22%
2000 34,271,494 22,326,355 56,597,849   23.99%
2001 32,985,484 19,712,628 52,698,112   6.89%
2002 26,603,917 19,840,629 46,444,546   11.87%
2003 30,048,371 19,428,129 49,476,500   6.53%
2004 37,985,572 19,678,009 57,663,581   16.55%
2005 34,851,582 17,343,810 52,195,392   9.48%
2006 31,851,644 18,773,805 50,625,449   3.01%
2007 34,274,471 19,198,453 53,472,924   5.62%
2008 31,504,729 17,435,687 48,940,416   8.48%
2009 31,248,525 14,610,526 45,859,051   6.30%
2010 36,191,069 18,686,898 54,877,967   19.67%
2011 36,511,394 15,271,651 51,783,045   5.64%
2012 43,415,209 13,558,398 56,973,607   10.02%
2013 46,548,042 15,186,420 61,734,462   8.36%
2014 39,081,696 15,048,599 54,130,295   12.32%
2015 65,378,724 19,353,499 84,732,223   56.53%
2016 49,976,828 16,947,007 66,923,835   21.02%
2017 55,340,945 17,974,165 73,315,110   9.55%
2018 62,817,080 19,240,760 82,057,840   11.92%

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Department of Transportation - Mactan-Cebu International Airport Authority. "Passengers 2017". Mactan-Cebu International Airport Authority. Retrieved February 11, 2018.
  2. ^ Hoontrakul, P. (2014). The Global Rise of Asian Transformation: Trends and Developments in Economic Growth Dynamics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  3. ^ a b c "Mactan–Benito Ebuen Air Base". Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved July 22, 2013.
  4. ^ Mactan–Cebu airport to set aside P300-M for expansion Archived September 16, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ Positive News Media, "P-Noy names four Cebuanos to Mactan airport board", "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 28, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2011.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ http://www.passengerterminaltoday.com, news, "Expanded Mactan–Cebu to open in November," http://www.passengerterminaltoday.com/news.php?NewsID=27172
  7. ^ Gregg M. Rubio/FPL (The Freeman), November 3, 2010, "Villarete to finish MCIAA administrative building despite corruption tag," http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleId=626707&publicationSubCategoryId=107
  8. ^ Alegado, Sieg (November 12, 2013). "World's biggest plane to deliver 140-ton power generator to PHL". GMA News Online. GMA Network Inc. Retrieved December 21, 2015.
  9. ^ Sollane, Jose (November 13, 2013). "World's biggest airplane in Cebu". The Freeman. PhilStar Daily, Inc. Retrieved December 21, 2015.
  10. ^ Agcaoili, Lawrence (April 23, 2014). "Megawide-GMR remits P16.1-B payment for Cebu airport project". Philstar.com.
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 17, 2014. Retrieved May 17, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on May 20, 2014. Retrieved May 17, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ Bunachita, Jose Santino (January 25, 2018). "New Mactan Cebu Airport terminal seen to open ahead of schedule". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved February 27, 2018.
  14. ^ Lopez, Virgil (June 7, 2018). "Duterte inaugurates new 'resort-like' Mactan Cebu airport terminal". GMA News. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  15. ^ "Duterte inaugurates new 'resort-like' Mactan Cebu airport terminal". GMA News Online. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  16. ^ Bunachita, Jose Santino. "Duterte leads inauguration of new Mactan airport passenger terminal". Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  17. ^ Adel, Rosette (August 27, 2018). "Duterte favors renaming Mactan airport in Cebu after Lapu-Lapu". The Philippine STAR. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  18. ^ Fernandez, Rona Joyce T. (May 21, 2017). "2nd runway project a 'go'".
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 7, 2013. Retrieved May 19, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  20. ^ "Megawide to open Mactan-Cebu airport Terminal 2 in June". BusinessMirror. Retrieved July 4, 2018.
  21. ^ Liu, Jim. "Philippines AirAsia expands Cebu international service from Aug 2019". Routesonline. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
  22. ^ https://www.routesonline.com/news/38/airlineroute/284782/xiamen-airlines-schedules-chengdu-cebu-service-from-late-june-2019/
  23. ^ "GRAPHS – Mactan – Cebu International Airport Authority". Retrieved January 12, 2019.

External linksEdit