Laoag International Airport

Laoag International Airport (Ilocano: Sangalubongan a Pagpatayaban ti Laoag, Filipino: Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Laoag) (IATA: LAO, ICAO: RPLI) is the main airport serving the general area of Laoag, the capital city of the province of Ilocos Norte in the Philippines. It is the only airport in Ilocos Norte and is the northernmost international airport in the Philippines by geographical location. The airport is a popular charter destination for tourists from China.

Laoag International Airport

Sangalubongan a Pagpatayaban ti Laoag (Ilokano)
Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Laoag (Filipino)
Laoag International Airport terminal exterior.jpg
Exterior of Laoag International Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
OperatorCivil Aviation Authority of the Philippines
ServesLaoag
LocationLaoag, Ilocos Norte, Philippines
Time zonePHT (UTC+08:00)
Elevation AMSL8 m / 25 ft
Coordinates18°10′41″N 120°31′55″E / 18.17806°N 120.53194°E / 18.17806; 120.53194Coordinates: 18°10′41″N 120°31′55″E / 18.17806°N 120.53194°E / 18.17806; 120.53194
Map
LAO/RPLI is located in Philippines
LAO/RPLI
LAO/RPLI
Location in the Philippines
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
01/19 2,780 9,120 Concrete
Statistics (2017)
Passengers161,019
Decrease 21.13%
Aircraft movements1,224
Decrease 0.19%
Cargo (in kg)3,064,132
Decrease 6.16%
Source: Statistics from eFOI[1]

It has one 2,420-meter runway[2] and is designated as a secondary/alternate international airport by the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, a body of the Department of Transportation that is responsible for the operations of not only this airport but also of all other airports in the Philippines except the major international airports.[3]

HistoryEdit

The airport was constructed by Americans before World War II as Gabu Airfield. The Japanese occupied the base on December 1941 and subsequently used it. During the Luzon campaign to retake the islands from the Japanese, Major Simeon Valdez led a raid on the airfield, burning the headquarters and setting fire to a fuel dump. Similar attacks follow in the succeeding days until its recapture on 15 February 1945 when it was abandoned due to Commonwealth military and guerrilla raids. By April 1945 the airfield was again operational hosting fighter and transport aircraft.[4] The airfield became a staging area for flights and air missions against Japanese forces in Northern Luzon by April and Okinawa by June 1945.[5]

After the war, the airfield was converted into a civilian airport.

The airport became one of the stops of the Breitling DC-3 World Tour held in 2017. The aircraft, a Douglas DC-3 with the registration number HB-IRJ landed for refueling in April as part of a round-the-world flight to celebrate the plane's 77th birthday.

The airport was also where 4 FA-50 light fighter aircraft were stored during the testing of Israeli radars on Paredes Air Station in Pasuquin, Ilocos Norte. It is also said that in the future, the same FA-50s would be permanently stored in the airport as a warning squadron for any disaster/threat to the city.[citation needed]

Airlines and destinationsEdit

AirlinesDestinations
China Airlines Taipei–Taoyuan
Philippine Airlines
operated by PAL Express
Manila
Royal Air Philippines Charter: Clark, Macau

Codeshare FlightsEdit

All of these code share flights are operated by Philippine Airlines on behalf of these airlines.

StatisticsEdit

Data from Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP).[1]

Passenger movementsEdit

Year Domestic International Total Change
2002 35,766 149,995 185,761  
2003 32,793 66,894 99,687   46.34%
2004 43,435 91,434 134,869   35.29%
2005 52,131 67,331 119,462   11.42%
2006 55,677 73,180 128,857   7.86%
2007 96,444 46,162 142,606   10.67%
2008 117,646 38,673 156,319   9.62%
2009 125,087 10,386 135,473   13.34%
2010 147,883 29,456 177,339   30.90%
2011 144,073 2,606 146,679   17.29%
2012 180,097 7,951 188,048   28.20%
2013 232,034 10,982 243,016   29.23%
2014 193,237 3,200 196,437   19.17%
2015 175,529 29,021 204,550   4.13%
2016 188,664 15,492 204,156   0.19%
2017 146,960 14,059 161,019   21.13%

Aircraft movementsEdit

Year Domestic International Total Change
2002 2,384 1,796 4,180  
2003 3,378 1,382 4,760   13.88%
2004 2,444 1,446 3,890   18.28%
2005 1,658 1,660 3,318   14.70%
2006 1,344 1,814 3,158   4.82%
2007 1,844 542 2,386   24.45%
2008 2,724 394 3,118   30.68%
2009 3,002 188 3,190   2.31%
2010 1,231 212 1,443   54.76%
2011 953 152 1,105   23.42%
2012 2,912 68 2,980   169.68%
2013 2,756 116 2,872   3.62%
2014 3,172 32 3,204   11.56%
2015 3,292 1,182 4,474   39.64%
2016 3,456 1,260 4,716   5.41%
2017 3,483 1,224 4,707   0.19%

Cargo movementsEdit

Year Domestic (in kg) International (in kg) Total (in kg) Change
2002 487,250 1,671,107 2,158,357  
2003 546,811 2,482,738 3,029,549   40.36%
2004 906,908 1,938,637 2,845,545   6.07%
2005 1,370,561 956,243 2,326,804   18.23%
2006 1,012,878 1,787,887 2,800,765   20.37%
2007 1,967,914 893,085 2,860,999   2.15%
2008 2,011,807 456,985 2,468,792   13.71%
2009 2,244,994 108,338 2,353,332   4.68%
2010 2,519,297 42,930 2,562,227   8.88%
2011 18,565,134 189 18,565,323   624.58%
2012 2,698,932 2,380 2,701,312   85.45%
2013 2,623,496 75,130 2,698,626   0.10%
2014 2,528,669 23,470 2,552,139   5.43%
2015 2,844,889 70,196 2,915,085   14.22%
2016 3,143,780 121,424 3,265,204   12.01%
2017 2,945,989 118,143 3,064,132   6.16%

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  1. ^ a b Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (23 July 2018). "Yearly Passenger, Cargo and Aircraft Movements of all airports in the Philippines 1997-2017". Republic of the Philippines - Freedom of Information Portal. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 8 April 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) Laoag Airport - Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 30 October 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) National Airports - Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines
  4. ^ "Pacific Wrecks - Laoag Airfield (Gabu)". Pacific Wrecks. 22 May 2017. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  5. ^ "353 Special Operations Group (AFSOC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. United States Air Force. 24 November 2010. Retrieved 29 January 2018.

External linksEdit