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The Genesis Open is a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour in southern California, first played 92 years ago in 1926.[1] Its previous names include Los Angeles Open, Northern Trust Open and Nissan Open. Played annually in February at the Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, it is often the concluding event of the tour's "West Coast Swing" early in the calendar year, before the tour moves east to Florida.

Los Angeles Open
Los Angeles Open logo.png
Location Pacific Palisades, California
Established 1926, 92 years ago[1]
Course(s) Riviera Country Club
Par 71
Length 7,322 yards (6,695 m)[2][3]
Organized by Tiger Woods Foundation
Tour(s) PGA Tour
Format Stroke play
Prize fund $7.2 million
Month played February
Aggregate 264 Lanny Wadkins (1985)
To par −20 as above
United States Bubba Watson
Riviera C.C. is located in the US
Riviera C.C.
Riviera C.C.
Location in the United States
Riviera C.C. is located in California
Riviera C.C.
Riviera C.C.
Location in California
Los Angeles Open is located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area
Riviera CC
Riviera CC
Valencia CC
Valencia CC
Rancho Park GC
Rancho Park GC
Brookside GC
Brookside GC
Inglewood CC
Inglewood CC
Fox Hills CC
Fox Hills CC
Locations in L.A. metro area since 1945

The tournament has been held at Riviera on a near-continuous basis since 1973. South Korea-based Hyundai Motor Group, through its Genesis Motors subsidiary, took over sponsorship in 2017, after nine seasons from Northern Trust Corporation, based in Chicago, following a 21-year sponsorship by Nissan Motors. Entertainer Glen Campbell was the celebrity host of the Los Angeles Open from 1971 to 1983.

Contents

Tournament sitesEdit

Listed by most recent

Times
hosted
Venue Location Years
56 Riviera Country Club Pacific
Palisades
1929–30, 1941, 1945–53,
1973–82, 1984–97, 1999–2018
1 Valencia Country Club Valencia 1998
17 Rancho Park Golf Course Los Angeles 1956–67, 1969–72, 1983
1 Brookside Golf Course Pasadena 1968
1 Inglewood Country Club Inglewood 1955
1 Fox Hills Country Club Culver City 1954
4 Wilshire Country Club Los Angeles 1928, 1931, 1933, 1944
2 Hillcrest Country Club Los Angeles 1932, 1942
5 Los Angeles Country Club Los Angeles 1926, 1934–36, 1940
3 Griffith Park Los Angeles 1937–39
1 El Caballero Country Club Tarzana 1927
  • Not held in 1943

HistoryEdit

Prior to World War II, the event led a nomadic existence in southern California, moving from course to course. The inaugural event 92 years ago in 1926 was played at Los Angeles Country Club in Los Angeles;[4] in 1927 the event moved to El Caballero Country Club in Tarzana for the only time.[5] In 1928, the event moved again to Wilshire Country Club, also in Los Angeles, and 1929 and 1930 saw the event's first foray to the Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades before returning again to Los Angeles for the next decade. From 1931–33, the event alternated between Wilshire CC and Hillcrest Country Club, before returning to Los Angeles CC from 1934–36. From 1937–39, the event was played at Griffith Park before returning to Los Angeles CC in 1940. Babe Zaharias played in the 1938 event, being the first woman to play in a professional golf tournament for men.

In 1941, the event returned to Riviera CC and in 1942 was played again at Hillcrest CC before World War II intervened.

The event started up again in 1944 at Wilshire CC before spending the next nine years (1945–53) at Riviera CC, which also hosted the U.S. Open in June 1948, won by Ben Hogan in a record score. In 1954, the event was played at Fox Hills Country Club (now in Culver City) and in 1955 moved to Inglewood Country Club. From 1956–72, the event returned to Los Angeles at Rancho Park Golf Course, with the exception of 1968, which was at Brookside Golf Course in Pasadena, adjacent to the Rose Bowl.[6]

The L.A. Open was traditionally the first event of the season, played in early January; it moved to the latter half of February in 1974. The year before, it began its current relationship with Riviera CC. The tournament has only twice been played at other courses since: Rancho Park Golf Course in 1983, while Riviera prepared to host the PGA Championship, and Valencia Country Club in 1998, while Riviera prepared to host the U.S. Senior Open. The event remained at Riviera in 1995, despite Riviera hosting the PGA Championship that year,[7] and will also remain in 2017, when the course hosts the U.S. Amateur.

In 1992, the Nissan Los Angeles Open at Riviera CC was the site of Tiger Woods' first PGA Tour event as an amateur player, as a 16-year-old high school sophomore.[8] Neither Woods nor Jack Nicklaus have won the event; Woods lost in a playoff in 1998 (at Valencia)[9] and was again a runner-up the next year at Riviera,[10] while Nicklaus' best finish was two strokes back in solo second in 1978.[11] He had earned his first paycheck as a pro in the event in 1962 at Rancho Park, less than thirty four dollars.[12]

The 2001 event was only the second time that a six-player playoff was needed in PGA Tour history to determine the tournament winner. Robert Allenby won the playoff ahead of Toshi Izawa, Brandel Chamblee, Bob Tway, Jeff Sluman, and Dennis Paulson.[13][14]

In 2005, the tournament was shortened by 36 holes due to rain. Adam Scott defeated Chad Campbell on the first hole of a sudden-death playoff on a Monday. Due to the event's length, this win is counted as unofficial for Scott.[15]

In 2007, Rich Beem made a hole-in-one at the 14th hole on Saturday to win a new red Altima coupe, which he immediately ascended, embraced, and sat atop of in triumph.[16] The sequence was later made into a Nissan commercial. (video) Beem credited Peter Jacobsen for inspiring his reaction; Jacobsen aced the same hole thirteen years earlier in 1994 then hopped into the nearby 300ZX convertible and pretended to drive it.[17][18][19][20]

In September 2007, it was originally announced that Bearing Point, a consulting firm based in McLean, Virginia, would become the new title sponsor of the tournament, but Northern Trust became the title sponsor beginning in February 2008. The five-year agreement, which extended through the 2012 event, was announced October 15, 2007, by PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem and William A. Osborn, Chairman and CEO of Northern Trust Corporation.[21] The tournament became known as the Northern Trust Open, and the new partnership marks the beginning of a process of transformation for this high-profile tournament. As part of the initial move to enhance the tournament, the Northern Trust Open increased its purse to $6.2 million in 2008, an increase of $1 million over 2007. Additionally, the tournament pro-am went from four amateurs to three per group. After the initial 5-year agreement, it was extended 4 years to cover Northern Trust's partnership through the 2016 event.

Phil Mickelson won the 2008 tournament and successfully defended the title in 2009 with a one-stroke victory over Steve Stricker. In 2010, Stricker came back to win the Northern Trust Open and secure his ranking of the number two player in the world. In 2016, Bubba Watson won the tournament for a second time in three years, seeing off Adam Scott and Jason Kokrak to win by one shot with a 15-under-par total.[22]

Charlie Sifford Memorial ExemptionEdit

In 2009, the tournament created an exemption for a player who represents the advancement of diversity in golf. The exemption is called the Charlie Sifford Memorial Exemption, in honor of pioneering black golfer and 1969 tournament winner Charlie Sifford.[23][24][25][26] While most of the recipients have been of African-American descent, the 2015 exemption went to PGA Tour rookie Carlos Sainz, Jr., of Filipino and Bolivian descent;[27] and the 2016 recipient, J. J. Spaun, is also of Filipino descent.[28]

Year Player Result
2009 Vincent Johnson[25] Cut
2010 Joshua Wooding Cut
2011 Joseph Bramlett Cut
2012 Andy Walker Cut
2013 Jeremiah Wooding T42
2014 Harold Varner III T70
2015 Carlos Sainz, Jr.[27] Cut
2016 J. J. Spaun[28] Cut
2017 Kevin Hall[26] Cut
2018 Cameron Champ Cut

2016 course layoutEdit

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Yards 503 471 434 236 434 199 408 433 458 3,576 315 583 479 459 192 487 166 590 475 3,746 7,322
Par 5 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 35 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 5 4 36 71

Source:[2][3]

WinnersEdit

Year Player Country Score To par Margin
of victory
Runner(s)-up Winner's
share ($)
Purse
($)
Ref
Genesis Open
2018 Bubba Watson (3)   United States 272 −12 2 strokes   Kevin Na
  Tony Finau
1,296,000 7,200,000
2017 Dustin Johnson   United States 267 −17 5 strokes   Scott Brown
  Thomas Pieters
1,260,000 7,000,000
Northern Trust Open
2016 Bubba Watson (2)   United States 269 −15 1 stroke   Jason Kokrak
  Adam Scott
1,224,000 6,800,000
2015 James Hahn   United States 278 −6 Playoff   Paul Casey
  Dustin Johnson
1,206,000 6,700,000
2014 Bubba Watson   United States 269 −15 2 strokes   Dustin Johnson 1,206,000 6,700,000
2013 John Merrick   United States 273 −11 Playoff   Charlie Beljan 1,188,000 6,600,000
2012 Bill Haas   United States 277 −7 Playoff   Keegan Bradley
  Phil Mickelson
1,188,000 6,600,000
2011 Aaron Baddeley   Australia 272 −12 2 strokes   Vijay Singh 1,170,000 6,500,000
2010 Steve Stricker   United States 268 −16 2 strokes   Luke Donald 1,152,000 6,400,000
2009 Phil Mickelson (2)   United States 269 −15 1 stroke   Steve Stricker 1,134,000 6,300,000
2008 Phil Mickelson   United States 272 −12 2 strokes   Jeff Quinney 1,116,000 6,200,000
Nissan Open
2007 Charles Howell III   United States 268 −16 Playoff   Phil Mickelson 936,000 5,200,000 [16]
2006 Rory Sabbatini   South Africa 271 −13 1 stroke   Adam Scott 918,000 5,100,000
2005 Adam Scott   Australia 133^ −9 Playoff   Chad Campbell 864,000 4,800,000 [15]
2004 Mike Weir (2)   Canada 267 −17 1 stroke   Shigeki Maruyama 864,000 4,800,000
2003 Mike Weir   Canada 275 −9 Playoff   Charles Howell III 810,000 4,500,000
2002 Len Mattiace   United States 269 −15 1 stroke   Brad Faxon
  Scott McCarron
  Rory Sabbatini
666,000 3,700,000
2001 Robert Allenby   Australia 276 −8 Playoff   Brandel Chamblee
  Toshimitsu Izawa
  Dennis Paulson
  Jeff Sluman
  Bob Tway
612,000 3,400,000 [13]
2000 Kirk Triplett   United States 272 −12 1 stroke   Jesper Parnevik 558,000 3,100,000
1999 Ernie Els   South Africa 270 −14 2 strokes   Davis Love III
  Ted Tryba
  Tiger Woods
504,000 2,800,000 [10]
1998 Billy Mayfair   United States 272 −12 Playoff   Tiger Woods 378,000 2,100,000 [9]
1997 Nick Faldo   England 272 −12 3 strokes   Craig Stadler 252,000 1,400,000
1996 Craig Stadler   United States 278 −6 1 stroke   Mark Brooks
  Fred Couples
  Scott Simpson
  Mark Wiebe
216,000 1,200,000
1995 Corey Pavin (2)   United States 268 −16 3 strokes   Jay Don Blake
  Kenny Perry
216,000 1,200,000
Nissan Los Angeles Open
1994 Corey Pavin   United States 271 −13 2 strokes   Fred Couples 180,000 1,000,000
1993 Tom Kite   United States 206* −7 3 strokes   Dave Barr
  Fred Couples
  Donnie Hammond
  Payne Stewart
180,000 1,000,000
1992 Fred Couples (2)   United States 269 −15 Playoff   Davis Love III 180,000 1,000,000
1991 Ted Schulz   United States 272 −12 1 stroke   Jeff Sluman 180,000 1,000,000
1990 Fred Couples   United States 266 −18 3 strokes   Gil Morgan 180,000 1,000,000
1989 Mark Calcavecchia   United States 272 −12 1 stroke   Sandy Lyle 180,000 1,000,000
Los Angeles Open presented by Nissan
1988 Chip Beck   United States 267 −17 4 strokes   Mac O'Grady
  Bill Sander
135,000 750,000
1987 Chen Tze-chung   Taiwan 275 −9 Playoff   Ben Crenshaw 108,000 600,000
Los Angeles Open
1986 Doug Tewell   United States 270 −14 7 strokes   Clarence Rose 81,000 450,000
1985 Lanny Wadkins (2)   United States 264 −20 7 strokes   Hal Sutton 72,000 400,000
1984 David Edwards   United States 279 −5 3 strokes   Jack Renner 72,000 400,000
Glen Campbell-Los Angeles Open
1983 Gil Morgan (2)   United States 270 −14 2 strokes   Gibby Gilbert
  Mark McCumber
  Lanny Wadkins
54,000 300,000
1982 Tom Watson (2)   United States 271 −13 Playoff   Johnny Miller 54,000 300,000
1981 Johnny Miller   United States 270 −14 2 strokes   Tom Weiskopf 54,000 300,000
1980 Tom Watson   United States 276 −8 1 stroke   Bob Gilder
  Don January
45,000 250,000
1979 Lanny Wadkins   United States 276 −8 1 stroke   Lon Hinkle 45,000 250,000
1978 Gil Morgan   United States 278 −6 2 strokes   Jack Nicklaus 40,000 225,000 [11]
1977 Tom Purtzer   United States 273 −11 1 stroke   Lanny Wadkins 40,000 225,000
1976 Hale Irwin   United States 272 −12 2 strokes   Tom Watson 37,000 185,000
1975 Pat Fitzsimons   United States 275 −9 4 strokes   Tom Kite 30,000 150,000
1974 Dave Stockton   United States 276 −8 2 strokes   John Mahaffey
  Sam Snead
30,000 150,000
1973 Rod Funseth   United States 276 −8 3 strokes   Don Bies
  David Graham
  Dave Hill
  Tom Weiskopf
27,000 135,000
1972 George Archer   United States 270 −14 Playoff   Tommy Aaron
  Dave Hill
25,000 125,000
1971 Bob Lunn   United States 274 −10 Playoff   Billy Casper 22,000 110,000
Los Angeles Open
1970 Billy Casper (2)   United States 276 −8 Playoff   Hale Irwin 20,000 100,000
1969 Charlie Sifford   United States 276 −8 Playoff   Harold Henning 20,000 100,000 [23][24]
1968 Billy Casper   United States 274 −10 3 strokes   Arnold Palmer 20,000 100,000 [6]
1967 Arnold Palmer (3)   United States 269 −15 5 strokes   Gay Brewer 20,000 100,000
1966 Arnold Palmer (2)   United States 273 −11 3 strokes   Miller Barber
  Paul Harney
11,000 75,000 [29]
1965 Paul Harney (2)   United States 276 −8 3 strokes   Dan Sikes 12,000 75,000
1964 Paul Harney   United States 280 −4 1 stroke   Bobby Nichols 7,500 50,000
1963 Arnold Palmer   United States 274 −10 3 strokes   Al Balding
  Gary Player
9,000 50,000
1962 Phil Rodgers   United States 268 −16 9 strokes   Bob Goalby
  Fred Hawkins
7,500 50,000 [12]
1961 Bob Goalby   United States 275 −9 3 strokes   Eric Brown
  Art Wall, Jr.
7,500 50,000 [30][31]
1960 Dow Finsterwald   United States 280 −4 3 strokes   Bill Collins
  Jay Hebert
  Dave Ragan
5,500 44,500
1959 Ken Venturi   United States 278 −6 2 strokes   Art Wall, Jr. 5,300 35,000
1958 Frank Stranahan   United States 275 −9 3 strokes   E. J. Harrison 7,000 35,000
1957 Doug Ford   United States 280 −4 1 stroke   Jay Hebert 7,000 37,500 [32]
1956 Lloyd Mangrum (4)   United States 272 −12 3 strokes   Jerry Barber 6,000 32,500 [33]
1955 Gene Littler   United States 276 −8 2 strokes   Ted Kroll 5,000 25,000 [34]
1954 Fred Wampler   United States 281 −3 1 stroke   Jerry Barber
  Chick Harbert
4,000 20,000 [35]
1953 Lloyd Mangrum (3)   United States 280 −4 5 strokes   Jack Burke, Jr. 2,750 20,000 [36]
1952 Tommy Bolt   United States 289 +5 Playoff   Jack Burke, Jr. 4,000 17,500 [37]
1951 Lloyd Mangrum (2)   United States 280 −4 1 stroke   Henry Ransom 2,600 15,000 [38]
1950 Sam Snead (2)   United States 280 −4 Playoff   Ben Hogan 2,600 15,000 [39]
1949 Lloyd Mangrum   United States 284 E 3 strokes   E. J. Harrison 2,600 15,000 [40]
1948 Ben Hogan (3)   United States 275 −9 4 strokes   Lloyd Mangrum 2,000 10,000 [41]
1947 Ben Hogan (2)   United States 280 −4 3 strokes   Toney Penna 2,000 10,000 [42]
1946 Byron Nelson   United States 284 E 5 strokes   Ben Hogan 2,667 13,333 [43]
1945 Sam Snead   United States 283 −1 1 stroke   Jug McSpaden
  Byron Nelson
2,666 13,333 [44]
1944 Jug McSpaden   United States 278 −6 3 strokes   Johnny Bulla 4,300 12,500 [45]
1943 No tournament due to World War II
1942 Ben Hogan   United States 282 −6 Playoff   Jimmy Thomson 3,500 10,000 [46][47]
1941 Johnny Bulla   United States 281 −3 2 strokes   Craig Wood 3,500 10,000 [48]
1940 Lawson Little   United States 282 +2 1 stroke   Clayton Heafner 1,500 5,000 [49]
1939 Jimmy Demaret   United States 274 −10 7 strokes   Jug McSpaden 1,650 5,000 [50]
1938 Jimmy Thomson   Scotland 273 −11 4 strokes   Johnny Revolta 2,100 5,000 [51]
1937 Harry Cooper (2)   United States 274 −10 5 strokes   Ralph Guldahl
  Horton Smith
2,500 8,000 [52]
1936 Jimmy Hines   United States 280 E 4 strokes   Henry Picard
  Jimmy Thomson
1,500 5,000 [53]
1935 Vic Ghezzi   United States 285 +5 Playoff   Johnny Revolta 1,075 5,000 [54][55]
1934 Macdonald Smith (4)   Scotland 280 E 8 strokes   Wille Hunter
  Bill Mehlhorn
1,450 5,000 [56][57]
1933 Craig Wood   United States 282 −2 4 strokes   Leo Diegel
  Willie Hunter
1,525 5,000 [58][59]
1932 Macdonald Smith (3)   Scotland 281 −3 4 strokes   Leo Diegel
  Olin Dutra
  Joe Kirkwood, Sr.
  Dick Metz
2,000 7,500 [60][61]
1931 Ed Dudley   United States 285 +1 2 strokes   Al Espinosa
  Eddie Loos
3,500 10,000 [62][63]
1930 Denny Shute   United States 296 +12 4 strokes   Bobby Cruickshank
  Horton Smith
3,500 10,000 [64][65]
1929 Macdonald Smith (2)   Scotland 285 +1 6 strokes   Tommy Armour 3,500 10,000 [66][67]
1928 Macdonald Smith   Scotland 284 E 3 strokes   Harry Cooper 3,500 10,000 [68][69]
1927 Bobby Cruickshank   Scotland 282 −6 6 strokes   Ed Dudley
  Charles Guest
3,500 10,000 [70][71]
1926 Harry Cooper   United States 279 −9 3 strokes   George Von Elm 3,500 10,000 [72][73]

*Rain-shortened to 54 holes
^Rain-shortened to 36 holes; unofficial win
Note: Green highlight indicates scoring records.
Main sources[74][75][76]

Multiple winnersEdit

Sixteen men have won this tournament more than once through 2018.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Shaffer, George (January 11, 1926). "Harry Cooper, 21, wins $10,000 L.A. golf open". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 27. 
  2. ^ a b "Northern Trust Open Course". PGA Tour. 2016. Archived from the original on February 17, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "2016 PGA Hole Statistics - Northern Trust Open". ESPN. February 21, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016. 
  4. ^ Shaffer, George (January 10, 1926). "Kirkwood stars at L.A." Chicago Sunday Tribune. p. 1, sec. 2. 
  5. ^ Shaffer, George (January 9, 1927). "Four cards of 141 lead in Los Angeles Open golf meet". Chicago Sunday Tribune. p. 1, sec. 2. 
  6. ^ a b "Casper's 274 wins LA Open golf". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. January 29, 1968. p. 23. 
  7. ^ "Pavin repeats in Nissan". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Associated Press. February 27, 1995. p. D-2. 
  8. ^ "Under-control loves shoots 8-under 63, captures L.A. lead". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). wire services. February 29, 1992. p. 4C. 
  9. ^ a b "Mayfair rallies, shuts door on Woods". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. February 2, 1998. p. 1D. 
  10. ^ a b "Els holds on to win Nissan Open by 2". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. February 22, 1999. p. C3. 
  11. ^ a b "Nicklaus loses the LA Open". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). wire services. February 20, 1978. p. 1D. 
  12. ^ a b "Rodgers fires 62 to win L.A. Open". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. January 9, 1962. p. 3B. 
  13. ^ a b "Allenby wins 6-man Nissan Open playoff". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). Associated Press. February 26, 2001. p. 5C. 
  14. ^ Kelley, Brent. "Largest Sudden-Death Playoffs". About.com. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  15. ^ a b "Scott wins at Nissan Open". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). Associated Press. February 22, 2005. p. 5C. 
  16. ^ a b "Beem drives home a winner, Lefty stalls". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. February 18, 2007. p. D2. 
  17. ^ "Top 10 aces of all-time on the PGA Tour". You Tube. Retrieved February 21, 2017. 
  18. ^ "An Interview with Rich Beem" (PDF). Sports Transcripts.com. February 17, 2007. Retrieved February 18, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Rich Beem - profile". PGA Tour. Archived from the original on March 1, 2012. Retrieved February 18, 2012. 
  20. ^ "Beem may be '1' to watch again". Los Angeles Times. February 18, 2007. Retrieved February 18, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Northern Trust Press Release". Retrieved November 12, 2007. 
  22. ^ Inglis, Martin (February 22, 2016). "Bubba Watson still 'mad' despite win". bunkered. 
  23. ^ a b "Sifford captures LA Open". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. January 13, 1969. p. 2B. 
  24. ^ a b "Siford wins LA Open in sudden death". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Associated Press. January 13, 1969. p. 24. 
  25. ^ a b "Oregon State Beavers Graduate Receives the First Sifford Exemption". ESPN. February 2, 2009. Retrieved January 25, 2012. 
  26. ^ a b Gray, Will (February 7, 2017). "Hall receives Sifford exemption into Genesis Open". Golf Channel. 
  27. ^ a b "Sainz earns 2015 Northern Trust exemption". PGA Tour. January 19, 2015. 
  28. ^ a b "J.J. Spaun earns 2016 Northern Trust Open Exemption". PGA Tour. January 18, 2016. 
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  30. ^ "Palmer shoots a shocking 12; Kroll leads". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. January 7, 1961. p. 8. 
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  34. ^ "Gene Littler Winner of Los Angeles Golf". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Spokane, Washington. Associated Press. January 10, 1955. p. 17. Retrieved February 5, 2010. 
  35. ^ "Fred Wampler Wins Los Angeles Open". The Tuscaloosa News. Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Associated Press. January 12, 1954. p. 8. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  36. ^ "Lloyd Mangrum Winner In Los Angeles Open". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Daytona Beach, Florida. Associated Press. January 6, 1953. p. 6. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  37. ^ "Bolt Cops L.A. Open Playoff". The Milwaukee Sentinel. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Associated Press. January 9, 1952. p. 5. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  38. ^ "Mangrun Wins Golf Tourney At Los Angeles". The Times-News. Hendersonville, North Carolina. United Press. January 9, 1951. p. 8. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  39. ^ "Snead Victor in Golf Playoff; He Praises Hogan". The Owosso Argus-Press. Owosso, Michigan. Associated Press. January 19, 1950. p. 16. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  40. ^ "Mangrum Wins First 1949 Event". Reading Eagle. Reading, Pennsylvania. United Press. January 11, 1949. p. 14. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  41. ^ "Ben Hogan Captures $10,000 Los Angeles Open Meet". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Daytona Beach, Florida. Associated Press. January 6, 1948. p. 6. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  42. ^ "Hogan Worries Over Shoulder". Gettysburg Times. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Associated Press. January 7, 1947. p. 3. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  43. ^ "Lord Byron Nelson Wins Los Angeles Open the First Time". The Owosso Argus-Press. Owosso, Michigan. Associated Press. January 8, 1946. p. 6. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  44. ^ "Sam Snead with 283 Wins Los Angeles Open". The Florence Times. Florence, Alabama. Associated Press. January 9, 1945. p. 5. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  45. ^ "Jug McSpaden Adds Another Golf Prize". The Milwaukee Journal. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Associated Press. January 11, 1944. p. 4. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
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  47. ^ "Wee Ben Hogan's Deadly Putter Cuts Down Jimmy Thomson to Capture Play-Off Of Los Angeles Open Meet". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Daytona Beach, Florida. Associated Press. January 14, 1942. p. 5. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  48. ^ "Bulla Wins Los Angeles Open Tourney". Toledo Blade. Toledo, Ohio. Associated Press. January 7, 1941. p. 14. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  49. ^ "Lawson Little Wins Tourney". The Owosso Argus-Press. Owosso, Michigan. Associated Press. January 9, 1940. p. 7. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  50. ^ "Jimmy Demaret Takes Top Prize Los Angeles Open". The Lewiston Daily Sun. Lewiston, Maine. Associated Press. January 7, 1939. p. 9. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  51. ^ "Jimmy Thomson Wins In Open Golf Tourney". The Gazette. Montreal, Canada. Associated Press. January 11, 1938. p. 11. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  52. ^ "Cooper Captures Los Angeles Open". The Spartanburg Herald. Spartanburg, South Carolina. Associated Press. January 12, 1937. p. 7. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  53. ^ "Hines Captures Los Angeles Open". Eugene Register-Guard. Eugene, Oregon. Associated Press. January 13, 1936. p. 6. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  54. ^ "Ghezzi Wins Golf Title". The Gazette. Montreal, Canada. January 16, 1935. p. 16. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  55. ^ In 1935, Vic Ghezzi and Johnny Revolta split first and second place money after both finished at 285, Ghezzi won the 18-hole playoff
  56. ^ "Mac Smith wins in Los Angeles Open". Montreal Gazette. Associated Press. January 8, 1934. p. 11. 
  57. ^ "Mac Smith's 280 wins golf title at Los Angeles". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 9, 1934. p. 17. 
  58. ^ "Wood wins 3d straight coast tourney". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 10, 1933. p. 19. 
  59. ^ "Another rich winter golf prize for Wood". Reading Eagle. (Pennsylvania). Associated Press. January 10, 1933. p. 12. 
  60. ^ "Par surrenders to Mac Smith in coast tourney". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 11, 1932. p. 21. 
  61. ^ "Mac Smith Wins Los Angeles Open; Never Loses Lead". Palm Beach Daily News. Palm Beach, Florida. United Press. January 10, 1932. p. 1. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  62. ^ "Ed Dudley's 285 wins $10,000 Open at Los Angeles". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 13, 1931. p. 25. 
  63. ^ "Dudley's Finish Wins Golf Title L' Angeles Open". Palm Beach Daily News. Palm Beach, Florida. United Press. January 13, 1931. p. 4. Retrieved February 7, 2010. 
  64. ^ "Denny Shute's 296 is best in coast tourney". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 15, 1928. p. 21. 
  65. ^ Wagoner, Ronald W. (January 15, 1930). "Denny Shute wins rich Los Angeles Open tourney". Pittsburgh Press. United Press. p. 12. 
  66. ^ "Mac Smith's 285 wins $10,000 golf meet". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. January 14, 1929. p. 25. 
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