Henry Winkler

Henry Franklin Winkler (born October 30, 1945) is an American actor, comedian, author, executive producer, and director. Initially rising to fame as Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli on the American television series Happy Days, Winkler has distinguished himself as a character actor for roles such as Arthur Himbry in Scream, Coach Klein in Adam Sandler's The Waterboy, Dr. Henry Olson in The Practice, Dr. Stewart Barnes in Out of Practice, Barry Zuckerkorn in Arrested Development, Sy Mittleman in Childrens Hospital, Dr. Saperstein in Parks and Recreation, Eddie R. Lawson in Royal Pains, Fritz in Monsters at Work, and Gene Cousineau in Barry. He is the recipient of a number of accolades, including seven Primetime Emmy nominations (winning one) five Daytime Emmy nominations (winning two), six Golden Globe nominations (winning two), two Critics Choice Award nominations (winning one), and four Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations.

Henry Winkler
Henry Winkler (43968252532).jpg
Winkler at the Raleigh Supercon in 2018
Born
Henry Franklin Winkler

(1945-10-30) October 30, 1945 (age 75)
EducationEmerson College (B.A.)
Yale University (M.F.A.)
Occupation
  • Actor
  • comedian
  • author
  • executive producer
  • director
Years active1972–present
Works
Performances
Spouse(s)
Stacey Furstman Weitzman
(m. 1978)
RelativesRichard Belzer (cousin)
Max Winkler (son)
AwardsFull list

After greatly struggling with school and getting berated for his poor performance, Winkler studied theater at Emerson College and the Yale School of Drama, and was invited to be a member of the Yale Repertory Theater. After saving enough money through commercials and his work on the independent film, The Lords of Flatbush (starring then-unknown Sylvester Stallone), he traveled to California in September 1973 on the advice of his agent, and won a small role on The Mary Tyler Moore Show. He was then asked to audition for Happy Days, where he won the part of Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli, a role he portrayed for the next ten years.

After the end of Happy Days, and finding himself typecast, Winkler moved into producing and directing for many years. In this capacity, he was directly involved in the development of the original MacGyver, and worked on programs such as Sightings and The Hollywood Squares. He also directed the theatrical releases, Memories of Me with Billy Crystal, and Cop and a Half with Burt Reynolds. In addition, in 2003 he drew upon his childhood struggles with school in order to create the Hank Zipzer series of children's books (about the dyslexic schoolboy, Hank Zipzer), with children's literature author Lin Oliver. He also appeared as Mr. Rock in the BBC adaptation of the series. Winkler and Oliver next created the prequel series Here's Hank, as well as the Ghost Buddy series. They are currently writing the Alien Superstar series.

Winkler has been honored both for his role as "The Fonz," as well as his work with dyslexia (through the Hank Zipzer books). In 1980, he donated one of Fonzie's leather jackets to the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, in 1981, he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and in 2008, The Bronze Fonz was unveiled along the Milwaukee Riverwalk. A few decades later in 2011, he was appointed an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) by Queen Elizabeth, was named one of the United Kingdom's Top 10 Literacy Heroes in 2013, and was awarded the Bill Rosendahl Public Service Award for Contributions to the Public Good for his children's books in 2019.

Family History (1939–1945)Edit

"[By 1939], my father knew that it was time. He got a six-week visa from Germany to come and do work in New York but was expected to come right back. I have told this story - that he took his mother's jewelry, bought a box of chocolate, melted the chocolate down, put the pieces of jewelry in the chocolate box, melted - poured the chocolate over the jewelry, put the box under his arm, so when he was stopped by the Nazis and they said, are you taking anything of value out of Germany, he said, no, you can open every bag; we've got nothing. And the jewelry that he encased in chocolate, he sold when he came out of Ellis Island into New York and was able to start a new a new life here, slowly but surely. I have the actual letters from the government each time my father requested to stay a little longer, and they would say yes. And I was born."

—Henry Winkler describing how his parents escaped from Nazi Germany. From an interview with Terry Gross, NPR in 2019.[1]

Winkler's parents, Ilse Anna Marie (née Hadra)[2] and businessman Harry Irving Winkler,[3][4] were German Jews who were living in Berlin[3][2] during the rise of Nazi Germany. By 1939, his father knew that they were no longer safe and they had to leave Germany as a result. He thus arranged to take his wife on a six-week-long business trip to the United States, and he smuggled the family's jewels out of Germany by disguising them as a box of chocolates.[5][1] Winkler's Uncle Helmut was supposed to join them, but at the last minute decided to leave at a later date (and was eventually taken away by the Nazis).[6][1] Winkler later stated that, "at the time, my father, Harry, told my mother, Ilse, that they were traveling to the U.S. on a brief business trip. He knew they were never going back. Had he told my mother that they were leaving Germany for good, she might have insisted on remaining behind with her family. Many in their families who stayed perished in the Holocaust."[7]

Soon after he and his wife arrived in the United States, Winkler's father sold the jewels at a pawn shop, and settled in New York (in an apartment on the 10th floor of a building on West 78th Street).[7] His father then developed the same business (importing and exporting wood) that he had in Germany, and he eventually bought the jewelry back from the pawn shop.[1] Almost 80 years after his parents had left Germany, Winkler returned to Berlin in 2018 and shared this story on a season 2 episode of Better Late Than Never.[6][1][8]

Early life and education (1945–1970)Edit

Henry Franklin Winkler (named after both his Uncle Helmut and then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt)[9] was born a few years later on October 30, 1945, in the West Side of New York City's Manhattan borough (his home for the next 27 before moving permanently to California in 1973).[9][10] He has an older sister named Beatrice,[7][9][11] and is a cousin of actor Richard Belzer.[12] Although his family did not keep kosher, Winkler was raised in the traditions of Conservative Judaism,[9] and attended Congregation Habonim, where his mother ran the Judaica shop.[9]

Winkler's parents had planned that he would go to college, and then take over the family business. This wish became a point of contention between him and his parents, as he had wanted to be an actor since he was seven years old.[13][14][15] Winkler would later describe this conflict as one where his father "wanted me to go into the family business, buying and selling wood. But the only wood I was interested in was Hollywood.”[14] When his father grew frustrated with Winkler's focus on acting, he would ask why he brought the business over from Germany to the United States. Winkler would respond: "Besides being chased by the Nazis, dad, was there a bigger reason than that?”[5][11]

Difficulties in schoolEdit

Although Winkler was "outgoing" and "the class comedian" in school,[7] he also lived in a state of "constant anxiety"[9] over his struggles with schoolwork (it would years before he was diagnosed as dyslexic at the age of 31).[16][1][17][4] His parents "would not tolerate poor marks" (his father spoke 11 languages, could quickly do mathematics in his head), and were perpetually frustrated by his poor grades.[4][9] They referred to Winkler as "dummer hund" (dumb dog) in German, and repeatedly punished him for his inability to excel in school.[5][9] Winkler has described this time period as "excruciating...if I got a D, I went in my room and celebrated that I hadn't failed. My self-image was almost nonexistent."[4] He was also frustrated as he felt that he was not "stupid" and that he was "trying as hard as" he could.[17]

Winkler first attended P.S. 87 on West 78th Street, Manhattan,[18] and then the McBurney School in Manhattan's Upper West Side.[9][19] His consistently poor academic performance made it difficult to be involved in the theater,[9][15] as was "grounded most of my high school career", and was almost never academically eligible.[9][15] However, he did manage to appear in two theatrical productions: Billy Budd (play) when he was in the eighth grade, and Of Thee I Sing in the eleventh grade.[7]

"You want so badly to be able to do it and you can't. And no matter how hard you try, it’s not working...I would study my words. I would know them cold. I would know them backwards and forwards. I would go to class. I would pray that I had retained them. Then I would get the test and spend a lot of time thinking about where the hell those words went. I knew them. The must have fallen out of my head. Did I lose them on the street? Did I lose them in the stairwell? Did I lose them walking through the classroom doorway? I didn't have the slightest idea of how to spell the words that I knew a block and a half away in my apartment the night before."

—Henry Winkler describing his difficulties in school. From The Yale Center For Dyslexia and Creativity, "Henry Winkler, Director & Actor."[17]

Although Winkler graduated from the McBurney School in 1963,[19] he was not allowed to attend graduation, as he had to repeat Geometry for the fourth time during summer school. After finally passing the course, he received his diploma in the mail.[9][16]

Emerson CollegeEdit

Winkler applied to 28 colleges, but was admitted to only two of them, one of which was Emerson College in Boston,[5][19][9] which he joined in 1963. He majored in theater and minored in child psychology, as he considered becoming a child psychologist if he did not succeed as an actor.[20][9] He was also a member of the Alpha Pi Theta fraternity,[21] and appeared in Emerson's production of Peer Gynt (as Peer Gynt).[22][23] Winkler later recalled that, "I nearly flunked out my first year [of Emerson], I almost flunked out my second year, but I was able to go for four years."[5] He graduated in 1967,[22][24] and in 1978, Emerson awarded him an honorary DHL.[25]

Yale School of DramaEdit

During his senior year at Emerson, Winkler decided to audition for the Yale School of Drama. Although his then-undiagnosed dyslexia created difficulties during the audition (he forgot the Shakespearean monologue he was supposed to perform, forcing him to improvise), he was admitted to the M.F.A. program in 1967.[5][26][27]

Winkler appeared in They Told Me That You Came This Way,[23] Any Day Now, Any Day Now,[23] and The Bacchae (as a member of the chorus).[23] During the summers, he and his Yale classmates stayed in New Haven, and opened a summer stock theater called the New Haven Free Theater.[26] They performed various plays including Woyzeck, (where he portrayed the title role),[23][26] and Just Add Water (improv night).[26] He also performed in the political piece, The American Pig (at the Joseph Papp Public Theater for the New York Shakespeare Festival in New York City),[23] with classmates James Keach, James Naughton, and Jill Eikenberry.[26] In addition, he also appeared in a number of Yale Repertory Theatre productions while still a student, including, The Government Inspector (Dobchinsky),[23] The Rhesus Umbrella (Doctor Farley),[23] Don Juan (Pedro),[23] Endgame (play) (Hamm),[23] and The Physicists (Einstein).[23] He also appeared in Sweeney Agonistes and Hughie.[23]

Winkler would later credit his time at Yale as a critical to his future success, stating that he "used every morsel of what was given to me in drama, speech, dance, movement. It stays with you: the training, the struggle, the whole gestalt. When I did Happy Days, I used everything—the commedia dell’arte, the movement, the acting. We had teachers from the “poor theater” movement in Poland, which is about doing theater from nothing and speaking through your entire body as opposed to just your voice. I used that and all my movement training in the episode when Mork put a spell on the Fonz."[28]

Out of his original cohort of 25 actors at Yale, Winkler was one of 11 who graduated[26] when he received his MFA in 1970.[29][10] In addition, over two decades later in May 1996[30] he served as the Senior Class Day Speaker for Yale University's graduating seniors.[31][29]

CareerEdit

Yale Repertory Theater (1970–1972)Edit

After receiving his MFA in 1970, Winkler was one of three students (along with James Naughton, and Jill Eikenberry) from his graduating class of 11 who were invited to become a part of the Yale Repertory Theatre company,[26] where he appeared in a number of productions.[26][32] During the 1970-71 Season, Winkler performed in Story Theater Reportory (October 1970),[33] as the Rabbi in Gimpel the Fool[33] (and also appeared in Saint Julian the Hospitaler and Olympian Games).[33] He portrayed the youngest son in The Revenger's Tragedy (Nov-December, 1970),[33] Tommy's nephew in Where Has Tommy Flowers Gone? (January 1971),[33] Young Siward in Macbeth (Feb-March 1971),[33] Andres in Woyzeck and Play (April 1971),[33][34] and Master of Ceremonies/Prow/Couple 2/Horses/Milliner in Two by Brecht and Weill: The Little Mahagonny and The Seven Deadly Sins (May–June, 1971[33] and January 20–29, 1972[35]).

In the fall of 1971, Winkler was invited to be a part of the play, Moonchildren (along with Jill Eikenberry, Michael Tucker, Christopher Guest, and James Woods) which would open at the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C.[26] Three weeks into rehearsals, the director Alan Schneider fired him (as Winkler had been hired to fill the space until the actor that Schneider really wanted was available).[26] At the time, Winkler was certain that because he had been fired, he would never be hired as an actor again.[26]

1972–1984Edit

Pre-Happy Days (1972–1973)Edit

Winkler moved back to New York, and began to audition for plays, movies, and commercials.[26] However, he never had to work as a waiter because he was able to earn a living through performing in commercials (around 30), work which he genuinely enjoyed.[26][36] He was thus able to also perform with the Manhattan Theater Club for free.[4][36]

Winkler's first appearance on Broadway was as "John" in 42 Seconds from Broadway, a play that opened and closed on March 11, 1973.[37][36][4] He swore to himself that he one day he would "make that right."[38] His first television appearance also occurred during this time, when he delivered a telegram as an extra for Another World.[36] By 1973, he had roles in two independent films (The Lords of Flatbush and Crazy Joe), while performing with the improv group, Off the Wall New York.[36]

Winkler continued to feel anxiety, however, with the process of cold reading during auditions.[17] He thus depended upon compensation strategies: "I improvised. I never read anything the way that it was written in my entire life. I would read it. I could instantly memorize a lot of it and then what I didn't know, I made up and threw caution to the wind and did it with conviction and sometimes I made them laugh and sometimes I got hired."[17]

Happy Days (1973–1984)Edit

 
Richie (Ron Howard) and Fonzie (Henry Winkler) at Fonzie's apartment over the Cunningham's garage. The episode deals with Fonzie's destroyed motorcycle.
 
Potsie (Anson Williams), Richie (Ron Howard), Fonzie (Henry Winkler) and Ralph Malph (Donny Most) at Arnold's drvie-in.
 
Marion Cunningham (Marion Ross) enters a dance contest with Fonzie instead of Howard (who is not interested). Since both of them have kept their practice sessions a secret, Howard begins to think Marion has someone else, due to her unexplained absences at home.

In 1973, when Winkler's agent told him that it was time to go to California, he initially resisted thinking that he was not a fit for Hollywood.[36] His agent was persistent, however, and as Winkler had made enough money through commercial and film work, he decided to try Hollywood for one month (a decision which upset his improv group, Off The Wall).[36]

Winkler traveled to Los Angeles on September 18, 1973, with his Lords of Flatbush co-star, Perry King.[5][36] After meeting with his agency's west coast branch, and spending five days going to auditions, he was hired for a small part on The Mary Tyler Moore Show (Season 4, Episode 10, "The Dinner Party").[36] Although he was initially given four lines, they let him " ad-lib it to eight."[36][39][40]

During his second week in Los Angeles, Winkler auditioned for the part of Arthur Herbert Fonzarelli, better known as "Fonzie" or "The Fonz", on a new show called Happy Days.[39] He was not the first choice, however, as actors such as Micky Dolenz (of The Monkees) were originally considered.[41] He later recalled that he walked into the audition and was unnerved by the fact that "every actor I’d ever seen on television before was sitting there in the room."[42] After an initial reading, he was asked to return in costume, where, he later recalled, they plucked his "unibrow, combed my hair into a DA and put me in a white T-shirt and jeans."[42] He then made the decision that he "would be the only one standing in the room. I changed my voice, and it just unlocked me, and I realized I am NOT a leading man. I am a character actor."[5] He then said his six lines, threw his script in the air, and left the room (as the only one still standing).[36][5]

Winkler was offered the role of Arthur Herbert Fonzarelli on his birthday (October 30, 1973),[5][43] which he said he would accept if they would show who the character was when he took his jacket off.[5][36][1] He returned to New York for Thanksgiving, packed up his apartment, and moved permanently to Los Angeles.[36] He appeared as "The Fonz" on the first episode of Happy Days (which premiered in January 1974), and was continuously with the series until it ended it in July 1984.[44][45]

"The Fonz" was initially written as a minor role, based on a "tough guy" Garry Marshall knew in The Bronx.[36] Winkler, however, added his own special interpretation of the character during the first episode, based on "a deal" he had made with himself that if he ever played this kind of character, he would never comb his hair, chew gum, or keep a box of cigarettes rolled in his sleeve (as this is what actors would typically do).[36] Although he tried to explain this philosophy to the producers, he was told he had to follow the script and comb his hair. He thus stood at the mirror, motioned in a way that suggested "Hey I don't have to because it's perfect," and in doing so, created the seminal moment for the character.[36] In addition, ABC executives did not want to see Fonzie wearing leather, thinking it would imply that the character was a criminal. Thus, during the first season, Winkler wore two different windbreaker jackets, one of which was green.[36][1] Marshall eventually argued with the executives about the jacket, and eventually a compromise was made: Winkler could only wear the leather jacket in scenes with his motorcycle.[42] Winkler has noted that he could not actually drive the motorcycle (as he almost crashed it the first time he tried), so he never actually drove it during the series.[36]

By the middle of the second season, "The Fonz" began his transition into a breakout character when he was featured as the central protagonist in the episode, "Guess Who's Coming to Christmas" (December 1974).[5] By the third season, he became the lead of the series. Winkler recalled in a 2018 interview that he directly addressed the issue with his co-star Ron Howard (Richie), by saying to him: "so level with me, how has what's happened affected you? You are the star of the show, and the Fonz has taken off."[5] According to Winkler, Howard said that although he "was signed on as the star, you did nothing except be as good as you could be. It’s good for the show, we're friends."[5] In 2021, Howard reiterated these points by stating that Winkler had been "sort of a big brother" to him, and was "very supportive of the idea of me being a filmmaker."[46] Thus, while it was true that this shift had created "some sort of emotional problems" for Howard, "and business problems" (as he felt as if his "status was under siege"), it did not impact "the show, where we were all a great family."[46] Howard credits Winkler for recognizing this distinction, and for taking what Howard described as "a leadership role in openly talking about it, and always keeping our connection solid."[46]

In a 2018 interview with Winkler, journalist Michael Schneider states that it was at this point that the "the Fonz, became the biggest icon on television."[5] Winkler responded by stating that he "went from somebody who had no sense of self … it was scary. People wanted you know parts of my clothing, it was overwhelming… I got fifty thousand letters a week from all over the world and they all were delivered to me and I read them all."[5] Winkle notes that while he shares some characteristics with "The Fonz" (loyalty to friends and an undercurrent of anger that he drew from his struggles with school as a child),[36] they were fundamentally different, stating that "The Fonz" was "my alter ego. He was everybody I wasn't...He was in charge. He was confident. He was everybody that I ever wanted to have some part of in my body."[36][47][1]

DyslexiaEdit

In a 2019 interview with NPR, Winkler described the coping mechanisms he developed throughout his life that masked the difficulties he had with cold-reading scripts: "I would memorize as quickly as I could because I couldn't read the page and act at the same time to make an impression on the casting person or on the director and the producers...and I improvised the rest. And when they said, 'Well you're not doing what's written on the page,' I said, 'I'm giving you the essence of the character.'"[48] He notes that this issue was particularly painful during his time on Happy Days, as he was "embarrassed for 10 years...I didn't know that I had something wrong, so I just tripped over words and everybody just kind of tolerated it."[48]

It was during the period of the third-fourth seasons of Happy Days (when he was 31) that Winkler was finally given an explanation for these struggles."[48] His stepson Jed was diagnosed as dyslexic, and Winkler realized that he was as well.[17][1] Thus, while on Happy Days, he said that the cast would "sit around the table on Monday mornings and read the script, I would stumble at least once or twice a paragraph. And then I was diagnosed, and I made fun of it—I covered it in humor. But I was humiliated...[as] when I didn't know what was going on for the first year or two, they laughed. I'm sure it was frustrating because I kept breaking up the rhythm of the joke or the scene. One line depends on another line—it depends on that flow coming in like a tributary from a river, and my tributaries kept getting like there was a beaver in the middle of them making a dam."[19]

Additional roles (1977–1982)Edit

During his decade on Happy Days, Winkler portrayed Jack (a Vietnam War vet with PTSD) with then unknown Harrison Ford and Sally Field, in Heroes (1977), a role for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama.[49] He also appeared in the 1977 TV special, Henry Winkler Meets William Shakespeare, part of the CBS Festival of Lively Arts for Young People instructional series for children.[50][51] Winkler later portrayed Andy in the Carl Reiner film, The One and Only (1978), and Benedict Slade in An American Christmas Carol (TV movie, 1979). He was also the executive producer and host for the 1978 50-minute television version of the documentary, Who Are the DeBolts? And Where Did They Get Nineteen Kids?, which was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Informational Series or Special in 1979.[52] In 1983, he was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for his portrayal of Chuck in the 1982 film, Night Shift[49] (with Shelley Long before she appeared in Cheers, and then-unknown Michael Keaton). The film also marked Ron Howard's debut as a director.[53]

In 1981, Winkler was the executive producer for the ABC Afterschool Special:Run, Don’t Walk, based on the novel of the same name by Harriet May Savitz, and starring Scott Baio.[54] He then had his first directing experience the following year (at the behest of Garry Marshall), with the 13th episode of the Happy Days spin-off, Joanie Loves Chachi starring Baio and Erin Moran.[42]

1984–2003Edit

After Happy Days ended in 1984, Winkler was typecast as "The Fonz." He remembers it as a difficult period since he, "wanted to be this actor, this working actor. I did not have a plan B so when Happy Days was over I had no idea what to do. I wasn't getting acting jobs...I found it to be psychically painful. I was rudderless."[5][1][53] He states that when he went to auditions, people would say to him that although he was "a great actor," he was also "The Fonz," a phenomenon that lasted for over a decade.[13] However, he has also stated that he lives his life by "tenacity and gratitude," and sees himself as, "that toy with sand at the bottom you punch it and it goes right back to center. That is it: You have to get up, dust yourself off and you have to just keep yourself moving forward."[13][53] In response to the type-casting, Winkler started the production company, Fair Dinkum Productions (and various off-shoots). He chose the name in a nod to Australia, where "fair dinkum" is a common Australian term suggesting a person or thing is "direct," "honest," "fair," or "authentic".[53]

Directing (1984–1993)Edit

In 1984 Winkler directed, and was executive producer for, the CBS Schoolbreak Special: "All the Kids Do It" (starring Scott Baio).[55] This show won the 1985 Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Children's Special (executive producer)[56] and was nominated for the 1985 Daytime Emmy for Outstanding Directing in Children's Programming.[57] In addition to a few television programs, he also directed the theatrical releases Memories of Me with Billy Crystal (1988),[38] and Cop and a Half with Burt Reynolds (1993).[38]

Producing (1985–2003)Edit

Winkler was an executive producer for Rob Reiner's directorial debut, the 1985 film The Sure Thing (an early film for John Cusack).[58] He was also the executive producer for the original MacGyver,[53] (which won the Genesis Award for Best TV Drama in 1991),[59] and for Dead Man's Gun[60] (which won the Bronze Wrangler in 1998).[61] In 1988, he was the executive producer for the ABC Afterschool Special: A Family Again starring Jill Eikenberry and Michael Tucker.[62] In addition, he was the executive producer for a number of series including Sightings[53][5] and So Weird.[53][63] In 2002, he partnered with Michael Levitt (producer) to revamp and update The Hollywood Squares (for the fifth season of the 1998 reboot),[38][64] which was then nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show in 2003.[65]

Acting (1991–2003)Edit

 
Winkler, Adam Sandler, and Kevin James at a ceremony for Sandler to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, February 1, 2011.

Winkler returned to acting in the early 1990s. He starred in the 1991 television film, Absolute Strangers,[66] and in the short-lived 1994 television series, Monty with David Schwimmer (before his debut on Friends).[67] He also starred in the 1994 television film One Christmas, with Katharine Hepburn (in her last role) and Swoosie Kurtz (adapted from Truman Capote's short story "One Christmas").[68] In 1996, he appeared in his friend Wes Craven's 1996 film, Scream as foul-mouthed high school principal Arthur Himbry.[38] His role was uncredited, as the producers were concerned that he would only be seen as The Fonz, and thus distract from the film. After it was screened, however, and audiences responded well to his role in it, he was asked to do publicity for Scream.[38]

Winkler also began to collaborate with Adam Sandler after Sandler included Fonzie in The Chanukah Song (which debuted on Saturday Night Live).[69][70] Winkler called Sandler to thank him, which led first to a friendship,[70] and later to the role of Coach Klein in the 1998 film, The Waterboy.[70] Winkler also appeared in Sandler's Little Nicky in 2000,[71] Click in 2006 (as Sandler's father),[70] and You Don't Mess with the Zohan in 2008.[72]

In 2000, Winkler was nominated for a Primetime Emmy, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series, for his portrayal of Dr. Henry Olson in three episodes of The Practice.[38][52]

Work with John RitterEdit

Winkler also worked on a few projects with his longtime friend John Ritter, whom he first met in 1978 at ABC's 25th anniversary party, when Winkler was still on Happy Days, and Ritter was Jack Tripper on the television series, Three's Company.[38][73] He directed Ritter in the 1986 television movie, A Smoky Mountain Christmas starring Dolly Parton,[74] and in 1993, they co-starred in the made-for-television movie, The Only Way Out.[75]

Later in 1999, Neil Simon gave Winkler the chance to be involved with his first theatrical production since 1973, when he asked him to do a read-through of The Dinner Party. Given the problems he had with cold-readings, Winkler initially panicked.[17][38] However, he asked for the script in advance in order to memorize it, and managed to get through the reading. Simon eventually contacted Winkler again, and asked him to be in the theatrical version he was staging, to which Winkler agreed.[38] He was also excited to be working with Ritter again.[38] While their initial debut was not well-received, they were asked to perform the play in Washington D.C, which they did with a few casting changes (and to good reviews). The play then moved to Broadway, again to good reviews (which Winkler states made his initial experience on Broadway in 1973 "right").[38][37][76][4]

In 2003, he was slated for a guest appearance on Ritter's show, 8 Simple Rules (for Dating my Teenage Daughter). However, during the filming of the episode, Ritter became ill and had to be taken to the hospital, dying a few days later.[38] The episode was never completed, and Winkler's role was dropped.[77][78][73]

2003–PresentEdit

Hank Zipzer (2003–2019)Edit

"Lin and I, yesterday morning, wrote the first chapter of our 28th novel. Holy moly. We found that we don't write down to the kids—we just write comedies with the real truth, of the frustration, of trying to look up a word in the dictionary …They're not self-help books. It's not like, Woe is me, I got a problem. It's I'm trying, I really am. Hank Zipzer's cup is half full—he just spills everywhere. But it's comedy first. We make kids laugh."

—Henry Winkler discussing the Hank Zipzer book series in 2015.[19]

Winkler's career as an author began in 2003 with the Hank Zipzer series of children's books. He would follow the series with a prequel series in 2012 (Here's Hank), and the 2014-2016 BBC television series, also titled Hank Zipzer.

During the early 2000s, while Winkler experienced "a lull in [his] acting career,"[5] his manager Alan Berger suggested that he write children's books about the difficulties he experienced as a child before he knew that he was dyslexic.[79] Winkler was resistant to the idea, which he initially thought “was insane,” saying that he "couldn't do it."[79][5] He finally agreed however, after Berger suggested that he co-write the books with an experienced author. Berger then introduced Winkler children's book author Lin Oliver, and they met for lunch.[79] Oliver recalls thinking (after Winkler described his childhood experiences) that, "here is this very articulate accomplished man, who suffered all through childhood because he wasn't good in school. It's a very moving story. So we created a character together who is smart, funny, resourceful, popular, who’s got all the gifts - except that he is bad in school."[79]

The result of this meeting was a partnership that produced the 17 volume Hank Zipzer series of children's books about the adventures of a dyslexic child (2003-2010).[19][16][70] As the character is based on himself, Winkler chose "Hank" (short for Henry), and "Zipzer", the name of a neighbor in the apartment building that he grew up in (and that Hank Zipzer lives in).[80] They created these novels through a form of collaboration that was based on their mutual background in television, that involved “discussing ideas and working them out in a room together."[79] In addition Winkler notes, this system specifically draws upon Winkler's strengths as an actor (he would work through ideas out loud) and Oliver's strengths as a writer (she would type his and her ideas). When she would read back what she had typed, they would, "argue over every word, and then [she would] say ‘I have to get up, you drive me to drink.’ And she gets a Snapple from the kitchen.”[81][82]

After they finished the first series, Winkler and Oliver created the prequel series, Here's Hank (2014 to 2019), that explores Hank's life as a second grader, before he was diagnosed as dyslexic.[81][79][83][84] The Here’s Hank series also uses a special font called “dyslexie” (marking the first time that this font was used in book published in the United States).[81][79]

Winkler and Oliver next developed the television show Hank Zipzer (2014-2016) based on the book series. According to Winkler however, they "could not sell the show in America. We couldn't sell the books. They said, 'Oh Hank Zipzer is so funny...but we won't do the television show. So we sold it to the BBC."[85] At a later date, after the series was successful on the BBC, it was broadcast on the Universal Kids Channel in the United States.[83][86][85]

For the series, Nick James was cast as Hank,[87] while Winkler played the role of the music teacher Mr. Rock (who was based on one of Winkler's teachers at McBurney).[83] Winkler has said that the real Mr. Rock was the only teacher in his high school who believed in him[88] saying: "Winkler if you ever do get out of here you are going to be great."[83][85] They also produced the 2016 stand-alone television film, Hank Zipzer's Christmas Catastrophe.[89] Nick James won the British Academy Children's Awards for Performer for his portrayal of Hank Zipzer in 2016.[87]

Arrested Development (2003–2019)Edit

"Newspapers would mention jumping the shark...and they would show a picture of me in my leather jacket and swim shorts water-skiing. And at that time I had great legs. So I thought, ‘I don’t care.’ And we were No. 1 for the next four or five years...I’m very proud that I am the only actor, maybe in the world, that has jumped the shark twice — once on Happy Days, and once on Arrested Development.

—Henry Winkler in 2018, when asked what he thought of the phrase, "jumping the shark."[90]

In 2003, Mitch Hurwitz wanted Winkler to portray the incompetent lawyer Barry Zuckerkorn on one episode of Arrested Development.[38][91] However, as Winkler notes, he "went for one episode and...stayed for five years." He also returned for the reboot.[5][38] For his portrayal of Barry Zuckerkorn, Winkler won a Gold Derby Award: Comedy Guest Actor in 2004.[92] In 2014, Winkler was nominated as part of the cast for a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series.[93]

Arrested Development made a number of references to Happy Days (as one of the executive producers was Ron Howard, who also narrated the show). In Season One, Episode 17, Winkler's character Barry "looks into the mirror and does the 'no comb necessary' Fonzie pose."[38][94] Later in Season Three, Episode Three, Scott Baio joined the cast as the potentially new lawyer Bob Loblaw, stating, "look, this is not the first time I've been brought in to replace Barry Zuckerkorn. I think I can do for you everything he did. Plus, I skew younger. With juries and so forth." Vulture argues that this statement is "a nod to Happy Days, where [Baio] was brought on as Chachi, to be a new teen idol as Henry Winkler got older."[94] In addition, Barry's "hopping" over the shark on the pier in Episode 13 of the second season (2005), is a reference to the phrase jumping the shark which was coined in 1985 by Jon Hein in response to a 1977 Happy Days episode (Season Five, Episode Three, "Hollywood: Part 3") when Fonzie jumps over a shark while on water-skis.[38][90][94]

Additional roles (2004–present)Edit

In 2004, Winkler was nominated for a Daytime Emmy, Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program,[95] and in 2005, he won the Daytime Emmy, Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program, for his voice-work as Norville in Clifford's Puppy Days.[95] Winkler then returned to the stage in 2006 as Captain Hook in Peter Pan at the New Wimbledon Theatre, London.[38] He reprised the role in Woking for Christmas 2007. For the 2008/2009 season, he played Captain Hook at the Milton Keynes Theatre, and once again for the 2009/2010 panto season at the Liverpool Empire.[96] A few years later in 2012, Winkler made his third Broadway appearance as "Chuck Wood" in The Performers (November 14–18).[37][97]

Winkler also continued his work as a character actor in film and television. He had roles in a number of films including Stanley Yelnats III in Holes (2003), Uncle Ralph in the Christmas film, The Most Wonderful Time of the Year (2008), Marty Streb in Here Comes the Boom (2012), and Ed Koch in Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal: The Movie (2016). In addition, he also had a number of roles in television series including Dr. Stewart Barnes on Out of Practice (2005-6),[38] Eddie R. Lawson on the comedy-drama series Royal Pains (2009-2016) (where he was reunited with Ed Asner whom he first worked with on the Mary Tyler Moore Show in 1973),[13] Sy Mittleman on Childrens Hospital (2010–2016),[5][98] Dr. Saperstein in Parks and Recreation (2013-2015),[5][13] and Fritz in the 2021–present computer-animated streaming television series Monsters at Work (a followup to the 2001 film Monsters Inc).[99]

Better Late Than Never (2016–2018)Edit
 
"Stolperstein" (stumbling stone),
Helmut Theodor Winkler,
Nikolsburger Platz 1,
Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Germany

Winkler was both an executive producer for, and star of, the 2016-2018 American reality-travel show (which aired on NBC), Better Late Than Never. He starred along with William Shatner, Terry Bradshaw, George Foreman, and Jeff Dye in this adaptation of the South Korean reality series, Grandpas Over Flowers.[100][101]

Winkler was the focus of episode:"Berlin: How do you say Roots in German (Season 2, Episode 4)?" as the group explored the city from which his parents escaped in 1939.[6][8] The journey culminated at the site of a brass memorial plaque, known as a stolperstein, embedded in the pavement in front of the workplace and home of Helmut Winkler (who was originally scheduled to join Winkler's parents on a trip to the United States, but decided to stay behind and leave at a later date).[8] The stolperstein states that Helmut Winkler fled to Holland in 1940 but was interned at Westerbork and deported from there to Auschwitz in 1942. He died there December 31, 1942.[102] Winkler's father also worked in the building and lived next door.[1][6][8]

The discovery was a complete surprise to Winkler. Jeff Dye had secretly enlisted the help of Winkler's three children, who helped to plan every step in his journey around Berlin. A letter from them was waiting near the stolperstein, which stated that his time in Berlin reflected elements of his parent's life there. They wrote: "Even though the Winkler history in Berlin is heartbreaking, we thought it was important for you to connect with the past through this hopefully fun adventure, and connect you did...."[8]

Additional books and series (2011–present)Edit

Winkler published his memoir, I've Never Met an Idiot on the River in 2011.[84][13] In addition, he and Lin Oliver created two more children's books series: the Ghost Buddy book series (2012–2013),[103] and the Alien Superstar series (2019–present).[82][39][70] The protagonist of Alien Superstar is 13 year old 972–62, who escapes from his repressive planet and lands in earth at Universal Studios, where he gets hired to play an alien (since he already has the suit).[82] Winkler and Oliver have stated that while each series is unique, “every character we write, no matter how different they are, it always seems that they are the kid on the outside looking in, and wanting to get into the party.”[82]

Barry (2018–present)Edit

Bill Hader asked HBO if they could "get" Winkler for the part of acting teacher Gene Cousineau in the 2018–present HBO comedy Barry (which he created with Alec Berg). Hader states that he was "out of my mind" when HBO told him that Winkler was coming to audition.[104][70][105] After getting the role, Winkler noted that he "was 27 when I did the Fonz, and now, I'm 72. I just flipped the numbers."[106]

Winkler continued his lifelong habit of compensating when he forgot the lines in Barry.[5] He notes that: "I improvise a lot. I have done my whole career—except I drove Bill mad. He would say to me, 'Could you just do it once the way it’s written, so I could hear what we’ve got?' I would say, 'Yes, Bill. I'm going to.' Then, my mind would go to the left. If it worked, they kept it; if it wasn’t, both Alec and Bill would guide you to where they imagined it to be."[106][104][5]

Portraying Gene Cousineau allowed Winkler to draw upon personal experience as "no matter where you go to acting class, there is somebody like Gene Cousineau in there...everybody that I have talked to that has watched the show, or even over the years, talking about their drama teachers, they relate to the man or woman who just tries to annihilate you.”[106][1][104] At the same time, Winkler brought a level of warmth[105] to the character, markedly different from the way in which Hader and Berg had originally conceived him. Winkler has said that when "they wrote it, my character was much darker, much colder—really cynical. Then, they kept writing Gene to me. They said, 'Oh my god, you’re bringing such warmth to the character. We did not see that existed.' "[106]

Winkler received his first Primetime Emmy in 2018 for his portrayal of Gene Cousineau.[1][107] He also won the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series in 2018. In addition, he received one Primetime Emmy nomination,[52] two Golden Globe nominations,[49] and three Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations for the role.[108][109]

Personal lifeEdit

Henry Winkler's COVID-19 video for the Government of California, May 7, 2020, Office of the Governor of California

Winkler met his wife Stacey (formerly Weitzman; née Furstman) in 1976 at a clothing store in Los Angeles.[4] They married in 1978,[7] in the New York Synagogue where he had his Bar mitzvah.[4] They have two children together, Max (who is a director), and Zoe.[4] Winkler also has a stepson, Jed Weitzman, from Stacey's previous marriage with Howard Weitzman.[4] During a 2018 interview with Winkler for SAG-AFTRA, journalist Michael Schneider states that "the rumors are true," that Winkler is "one of the nicest, most genuine men in all of Hollywood."[5] He is an avid fly fisherman, and often fishes in Montana.[13]

Winkler contributed via Zoom to social justice issues during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020–present). On May 7, 2020, the Office of the Governor of California posted a video of Winkler on Facebook and Twitter reminding Californians to practice social distancing and to follow Stay-at-home orders.[110][111] Later on March 29, 2021, Winkler participated in a virtual SAG-AFTRA fundraiser for "emergency financial and medical assistance, disaster relief and scholarships to SAG-AFTRA artists and their families, as well as support the Foundation's free educational programming, including its children's literacy."[112] The fundraiser was a virtual table read of Season 3, Episode 2 ("The Motorcycle," 1975) of Happy Days. Winkler reprised the role of "Fonzie," while SAG members Glenn Close, John Carroll Lynch, Eli Goree, Aldis Hodge, Jamie Chung, Luke Newton, and Nicola Coughlan read the roles of Marion Cunningham, Howard Cunningham, Richie Cunningham, Ralph Malph, Joanie Cunningham, Potsie, and a waitress at Al's diner.[112]

LegacyEdit

"[For] kids growing up in the 1970s, there was one, absolute model of cool — not James Dean or Marlon Brando, but The Fonz."

—NPR, Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me![113]

The FonzEdit

 
Foreign Office Minister Alistair Burt with Winkler, who spoke at the Foreign Office in London on his experience of living with Dyslexia, 5 March 2013.

TV Guide ranked "The Fonz" as number four on its "50 Greatest TV Characters of All Time" list in 1999,[114] and a 2001 poll conducted by Channel 4 in the UK, ranked him as 13th on their list of the 100 Greatest TV Characters.[115] When asked which books influenced him in childhood, American journalist Anderson Cooper (who is also dyslexic) responded that, "I also loved the Fonz and read a book when I was around 8 called The Fonz: The Henry Winkler Story. I actually keep it in my office at CNN. Henry Winkler was very important to me when I was a child. Meeting him as an adult — and discovering what a kind and gracious person he is — was amazing."[116] This sentiment reflects National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution curator Eric Jentsch's statement on the description of Fonzie's leather jacket that Winkler donated to the Smithsonian in 1980: "Fonzie was a representation of cool at a time when you were learning about what cool was."[117][118][119]

Winkler won two Golden Globe Awards, and earned three Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series for the role. In 1981, he received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (for Television), largely due to his portrayal of Fonzie.[120][10] A few decades later, American artist Gerald P. Sawyer, unveiled the Bronze Fonz (a public artwork) on the Milwaukee Riverwalk in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin on August 18, 2008.[121]

Hank Zipzer and dyslexia awarenessEdit

Winkler would eventually be recognized for contributing to a greater understanding of dyslexia through the Hank Zipzer series. He was given the Key to the City of Winnipeg for "contributions to education and literacy" in 2010,[122] was appointed an Honorary Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) "for services to children with special educational needs and dyslexia in the UK" by Queen Elizabeth in 2011,[123][124] was named one of the United Kingdom's Top 10 Literacy Heroes in 2013,[125] and was awarded the Bill Rosendahl Public Service Award for Contributions to the Public Good for his children's books in 2019.[126]

Filmography and accoladesEdit

Winkler notes that during his lifetime, he has worked with "five directing geniuses": Garry Marshall (Happy Days), Adam Sandler, Mitch Hurwitz (Arrested Development), Bill Hader and Alec Berg (Barry).[127]

After portraying Fonzie on Happy Days, Winkler evolved into a character actor,[5] with roles that include the high school principal Arthur Himbry in Scream, Coach Klein in The Waterboy, Barry Zuckerkorn in Arrested Development, Sy Mittleman in Childrens Hospital, Dr. Saperstein in Parks and Recreation, Mr. Rock in the Hank Zipzer BBC series, Eddie R. Lawson in Royal Pains, Fritz in Monsters at Work, and Gene Cousineau in Barry. He is also the recipient of a Primetime Emmy,[52] two Golden Globe Awards,[49] a Critics Choice Award,[128] and two Daytime Emmys.[56][129]

BooksEdit

"How you learn has nothing to do with how brilliant you are...everyone in this room is powerful...figure out what your power is. We don’t know what we can do until we try."

—Henry Winkler, Keynote speaker, 13th Annual Boys and Girls Club Kids & Community Gala (2019)[15]

Books by WinklerEdit

Standalone

  • Winkler, Henry (1976). The Other Side of Henry Winkler: My Story. Warner Books. ISBN 978-0-446-87340-6.[130]
  • Winkler, Henry (2011). I've Never Met an Idiot on the River: Reflections on Family, Photography and Fly-Fishing. Insight Editions. ISBN 978-1-608-87020-2.[131]

Series

Books about WinklerEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Gross, Terry (April 11, 2019). "'I Never Had A Plan B': Henry Winkler On His Career, From The Fonz To 'Barry'". NPR. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Ilse Anna Maria Hadra Winkler". findagrave.com. Archived from the original on August 31, 2021. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Harry Irving Winkler". findagrave.com. Archived from the original on August 31, 2021. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Boughton, Victoria (May 7, 2001). "Happy Daze". People. Archived from the original on July 30, 2017. Retrieved December 9, 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Schneider, Michael (November 21, 2018). "Conversations with Henry Winkler (Fundraiser)". SAG-AFTRA. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d Dobson, Jim (December 7, 2017). "Exclusive Interview With William Shatner And Henry Winkler On Their Outrageous New Travel Series". Forbes. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Myers, Mark (September 28, 2011). "Henry Winkler on the Legacy of a Dyslexic Childhood". Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Better Late Than Never:How Do You Say Roots In German?:Season 2, Episode 4". NBC. January 8, 2018. Archived from the original on August 31, 2021. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Herman, Karen (November 10, 2006). "Television Academy Foundation-The Interviews: Henry Winkler (Chapter 1: On his childhood)". Archive of American Television. The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  10. ^ a b c "Henry Winkler: Hollywood Walk of Fame". Hollywood Walk of Fame. October 25, 2019. Archived from the original on August 29, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  11. ^ a b "Still Happy Days for the Fonz". The Jewish Chronicle. December 1, 2006. Archived from the original on September 26, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  12. ^ "Check out the stars you didn't know were related". TV Guide. Archived from the original on February 10, 2015. Retrieved November 13, 2013.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g Lewis, Andy (July 3, 2011). "Henry Winkler Spills 'Royal Pains' Secrets, Reveals the Only Way He'd Do 'Dancing With the Stars' (Q&A)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  14. ^ a b Watts, James (February 8, 2020). "Henry Winkler and Marlee Matlin talk friendship, road to Hollywood stardom at Tulsa Town Hall". TulsaWorld. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  15. ^ a b c d Lavender, Julie (September 20, 2019). "Henry Winkler: 'Everyone in this room is powerful'". Statesboro Herald. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  16. ^ a b c Drabble, Emily (May 26, 2014). "Henry Winkler: I didn't read a book myself until I was 31 years old". The Guardian. Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g "Henry Winkler, Director & Actor". dyslexia.yale.edu. Archived from the original on September 8, 2021. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  18. ^ Leferts, Brooke (February 8, 2019). "Henry-Winkler enjoying a run of very cool coincidences". ABC News. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  19. ^ a b c d e f Wong, Alia (February 3, 2015). "The Miseducation of the Fonz". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on August 30, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  20. ^ Sedgwick, Justin (October 30, 2015). "7 reasons why Henry Winkler is as cool as The Fonz". WABC-TV. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 19, 2021.
  21. ^ Staff (September 28, 2011). "Fraternity offers networking reception for students". Emerson College. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  22. ^ a b "Emerson College: Putting comics on the road to success: Henry Winkler, Class of 1967". Boston.com. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Brustein, Robert (October 1970). Story Theatre Repertory (program): Henry Franklin Winkler. Yale Repertory Theater. pp. 14–15. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  24. ^ Channel Guide Staff (December 19, 2008). "Henry Winkler Stars In The Most Wonderful Time of the Year". channelguidemag.com. Archived from the original on August 29, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  25. ^ "A List of Every Person to Receive an Honorary Degree from Emerson College". Emerson College. Archived from the original on July 28, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Herman, Karen (November 10, 2006). "Television Academy Foundation-The Interviews: Henry Winkler (Chapter 1: Yale)". Archive of American Television. The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  27. ^ Brody, Jennifer (August 2, 2001). "Henry Winkler, success story fueled by faith in Judaism". Clevland Jewish News. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  28. ^ Schlegel, Johanna (2012). "Bestselling Author (And Former Fonz)". Yale University Alumni Magazine. Archived from the original on September 26, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  29. ^ a b Gonzalez, Susan (1996). "Henry Winkler Speaks at Yale University Class Day". Yale University: Yale Bulletin. Archived from the original on September 26, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  30. ^ Staff (May 28, 1996). "Winkler Gives Advice to Yale Grads". The Buffalo News. Archived from the original on September 26, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  31. ^ "Yale College Class Day Speakers Since 1979". Yale University. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  32. ^ "1970-71 Yale Repertory Theatre". Yale Repertory Theatre. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h Brustein, Robert (1971). Two By Bertolt Brecht (program): Henry Winkler. Yale Repertory Theater. p. 14. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  34. ^ "(Image of Henry Winkler in "Woyzeck and Play, April 1971)". Yale Repertory Theatre. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  35. ^ "Yale Repertory Theatre: Production History, 1966/67-1979/80". Yale Repertory Theatre- Yale University Library. October 3, 2021. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Herman, Karen (November 10, 2006). "Television Academy Foundation-The Interviews: Henry Winkler (Chapter 2: Commercial Work)". Archive of American Television. The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 3, 2021.
  37. ^ a b c The Broadway League. "Henry Winkler – Broadway Cast & Staff". ibdb.com. Archived from the original on November 26, 2020. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Herman, Karen (November 10, 2006). "Television Academy Foundation-The Interviews: Henry Winkler (Chapter 5)". Archive of American Television. The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  39. ^ a b c Hobson, Jeremy (October 2, 2019). "Henry Winkler's New Kids Book 'Alien Superstar' Taps Into His Hollywood History". WBUR-FM. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  40. ^ Dicker, Ron (March 9, 2021). "Henry Winkler made his first big splash as Mary Tyler Moore's uninvited dinner guest". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on September 19, 2021. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  41. ^ "Micky Dolenz Recalls Nearly Becoming the Fonz". UCR. September 16, 2020. Archived from the original on September 18, 2021. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  42. ^ a b c d Goldberg, Lesley (July 20, 2016). "Henry Winkler Remembers Garry Marshall: "He Was Like My Surrogate Dad"". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  43. ^ Norris, Jan (February 9, 2017). "Heyy!: Actor Henry Winkler muses on a career ranges from Fonzie to his latest, a travel series". The Palm Beach Floriday Weekly. Archived from the original on October 3, 2021. Retrieved October 2, 2021.
  44. ^ Armstrong, Lois (May 24, 1976). "It's The Fonz!". People. Archived from the original on November 12, 2016. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  45. ^ Wilson, John M. (May 23, 1976). "Can Henry Winkler Outgrow 'The Fonz'?". The New York Times. p. 372. Archived from the original on May 16, 2017. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  46. ^ a b c "Ron Howard and Clint Howard Talk Brotherhood and Growing Up in Hollywood in Memoir". The View. October 12, 2021. Archived from the original on October 13, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  47. ^ Puckrik, Katie (September 27, 2011). "Henry Winkler: 'The Fonz was everything I wanted to be'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 12, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  48. ^ a b c Bowman, Emma (January 27, 2017). "Dyslexia Made Henry Winkler Feel 'Stupid' For Years. Now, He's A Best-Selling Author". All Things Considered NPR. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 13, 2021.
  49. ^ a b c d "Golden Globes Awards: Henry Winkler". Golden Globes. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved September 6, 2021.
  50. ^ "British Universities Film & Video Council: "Henry Winkler Meets William Shakespeare"". Bufvc.ac.uk. March 20, 1977. Archived from the original on December 10, 2014. Retrieved December 9, 2014.
  51. ^ Klemesrud, Judy (February 8, 1977). "From Leather Jacket to Tights: The Fonz Makes It in Stratford". The New York Times. p. 26. Archived from the original on February 20, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  52. ^ a b c d "Henry Winkler: Emmys (Primetime)". Emmys.com. Archived from the original on September 6, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  53. ^ a b c d e f g Herman, Karen (November 10, 2006). "Television Academy Foundation-The Interviews: Henry Winkler (Chapter 4)". Archive of American Television. The Interviews: An Oral History of Television. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  54. ^ "Harriet May Savitz Papers". University of Southern Mississippi McCain Library and Archives. Archived from the original on September 6, 2015. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  55. ^ "CBS Schoolbreak Special: "All the Kids Do It"". British Film Institute. 1984. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  56. ^ a b Hanauer, Joan (August 1, 1985). "CBS and its soap opera, 'The Young and The..." United Press International, Inc. Archived from the original on September 18, 2018. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  57. ^ Margulies, Lee (May 30, 1985). "ABC Leads Emmy Race in Daytime". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 7, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  58. ^ Thomas, Kevin (March 1, 1985). "Movie Review: It's a Sure Thing for Laughs". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 27, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  59. ^ Fischel, Jack (2008). Encyclopedia of Jewish American Popular Culture. Greenwood. p. 443. ISBN 978-0313339899.
  60. ^ O'Connor, John J. (March 1, 1997). "In the Old West, a Gun With a Past". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 4, 2018. Retrieved October 17, 2021.
  61. ^ Klinka, Karen (April 25, 1999). "Cowboy Hall Ceremony Honors Achievers in Western Art Forms". The Oklahoman. Archived from the original on October 18, 2021. Retrieved October 17, 2021.
  62. ^ "A Family Again". Turner Classic Movies. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  63. ^ "So Weird - Full Cast & Crew". TV Guide. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 27, 2021.
  64. ^ "Winkler will take center 'Square' behind scenes". Variety. April 25, 2002. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  65. ^ Susman, Gary (March 18, 2002). "Here are the Daytime Emmy nominations". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  66. ^ Dennis McDougal (March 13, 1991). "Battle Lines Form Over 'Strangers'". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2011.
  67. ^ Snierson, Dan (August 19, 2016). "William Shatner, Henry Winkler apologize for Star Trek V, Monty". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 28, 2021. Retrieved September 27, 2021.
  68. ^ "One Christmas (1994)". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved September 27, 2021.
  69. ^ "Weekend Update: Adam Sandler on Hanukkah - SNL". Saturday Night Live (YouTube). 1994. Archived from the original on September 27, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  70. ^ a b c d e f g King, Scott (October 17, 2019). "Henry Winkler On Career, Barry And New Children's Book". Forbes. Archived from the original on September 24, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  71. ^ Scott, A.O. (November 10, 2000). "You Think Hell Is Wild? Welcome to New York". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 13, 2020. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  72. ^ "You Don't Mess With the Zohan". The Hollywood Reporter. June 3, 2008. Archived from the original on September 27, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  73. ^ a b Winkler, Henry (December 26, 2003). "Farewell: Henry Winkler pays tribute to John Ritter". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  74. ^ "A Smoky Mountain Christmas (TV)". Paley Center for Media. Archived from the original on September 29, 2021. Retrieved September 22, 2021.
  75. ^ Everett, Todd (December 15, 1993). "Abc Sunday Night Movie the Only Way Out". Variety. Archived from the original on May 31, 2019. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  76. ^ Isherwood, Charles (October 20, 2000). "The Dinner Party". Variety. Archived from the original on September 17, 2021. Retrieved September 1, 2021.
  77. ^ Yasharoff, Hannah (August 26, 2021). "Kaley Cuoco gets emotional recalling her onscreen dad John Ritter's death: 'He's gone'". USA Today. Archived from the original on September 13, 2021. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  78. ^ Susman, Gary (September 15, 2003). "What will become of John Ritter-less 8 Simple Rules?". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  79. ^ a b c d e f g "Henry Winkler & Lin Oliver on "Here's Hank..." at the 2016 L.A. Times Festival of Books". PBS Books. April 10, 2016. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  80. ^ "Henry Winkler, Conversations at KCTS 9". Penguin Books Middle School. August 16, 2010. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  81. ^ a b c "Henry Winkler & Lin Oliver Discuss Here's Hank". Penguin Books Middle School. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  82. ^ a b c d "A conversation with Henry Winkler & Lin Oliver". San Diego Tribune. September 8, 2020. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  83. ^ a b c d "'The Fonz,' Hank Winkler on His New Book - Hallmark Channel". Hallmark Channel. October 19, 2017. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  84. ^ a b c d e f "Henry Winkler". Fantastic Fiction. Archived from the original on July 28, 2021. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  85. ^ a b c "Henry Winkler & Lin Oliver Discuss Here's Hank-Henry Winkler On His Inspiring Character 'Hank Zipzer' For Kids Suffering From Dyslexia". Today. October 27, 2017. Archived from the original on November 2, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  86. ^ "Hank Zipzer: Universal Kids Channel". Universal Kids. Archived from the original on January 25, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  87. ^ a b "Nick James Interview Hank Zipzer & BAFTA Children's Awards". British Academy of Film and Television Arts. November 29, 2016. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  88. ^ Blevis, Mark (January 21, 2008). "Interview with Henry Winkler". Just One More Book!!. Archived from the original on April 18, 2015. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  89. ^ "Hank Zipzer's Christmas Catastrophe - Full Cast & Crew". TV Guide. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  90. ^ a b Pond, Steve (August 21, 2018). "'Barry' Star Henry Winkler on Why He's 'Very Proud' He Jumped That Shark – Twice (Video)". TheWrap. Archived from the original on September 30, 2021. Retrieved August 30, 2021.
  91. ^ Wilstein, Matt (August 25, 2018). "Henry Winkler Is Finally More Than the Fonz—and Could Win His First Emmy for 'Barry'". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on September 27, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  92. ^ "2004 GOLDDERBY TV Awards". Gold Derby. Archived from the original on February 13, 2018. Retrieved October 17, 2021.
  93. ^ Ghahremani, Tanya (December 11, 2013). "This Year's SAG Award Nominees Have Been Revealed". Complex Networks. Archived from the original on September 7, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  94. ^ a b c Fox, Jesse David (May 21, 2013). "Arrested Development's 20 Most Meta Meta-Moments". Vulture. Archived from the original on September 16, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  95. ^ a b "The National Television Academy Presents The 32nd Annual Daytime Emmy Awards" (PDF). Emmyonline.org. 2004. Archived from the original on March 17, 2007. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  96. ^ Lyall, Sarah (December 21, 2009). "Topsy-Turvy Christmas Foolery". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 26, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  97. ^ Rooney, David (November 14, 2012). "Theatre Review: The Performers". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 6, 2021. Retrieved November 20, 2012.
  98. ^ Spiegel, Danny (August 20, 2010). "Henry Winkler Checks in to Adult Swim's Childrens Hospital". TV Guide. Archived from the original on April 27, 2015. Retrieved April 20, 2015.
  99. ^ Sepinwall, Alan (July 5, 2021). "'Monsters at Work': A Classic Comic Dynamic That's Fun for All Ages". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on July 23, 2021. Retrieved July 23, 2021.
  100. ^ Lee, Hyo-won (September 2, 2014). "This will be the first U.S. adaptation of a Korean variety show". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 24, 2015. Retrieved August 21, 2015.
  101. ^ Hong, Tae (June 10, 2015). "NBC casts William Shatner, George Foreman, Henry Winkler in 'Grandpas Over Flowers' remake". The Korea Times/Yonhap. Archived from the original on August 25, 2015. Retrieved August 21, 2015.
  102. ^ "Stumbling Stones: Nikolsburger Platz 1 - Berlin-Wilmersdorf". Traces Of War. Archived from the original on August 2, 2018. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  103. ^ "Lin Oliver & Henry Winkler Ghost Buddy: Zero to Hero". ExpandedBooks. January 24, 2014. Archived from the original on November 28, 2015. Retrieved October 11, 2021.
  104. ^ a b c Hunt, Stacey (March 23, 2018). "How the Minds Behind Barry Made an Unlikely Hit-Man Comedy". Vulture. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  105. ^ a b "Henry Winkler on HBO's 'Barry' and the Poetry of Good Cursing". Yahoo! News. Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  106. ^ a b c d Grobar, Matt (June 20, 2018). "Henry Winkler Brought Expert Timing & Stella Adler Anecdote To 'Barry', Playing Oddball Acting Coach Gene Cousineau". Deadline. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  107. ^ "Henry Winkler, 72, Wins His First Emmy and Recites Speech He 'Wrote 43 Years Ago': 'Daddy Won!'". People. Archived from the original on September 23, 2018. Retrieved September 23, 2018.
  108. ^ "The 25th Annual SAG Awards". sagawards.org. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  109. ^ "The 26th Annual SAG Awards". sagawards.org. Archived from the original on August 15, 2021. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  110. ^ Winkler, Henry (May 7, 2020). "Henry Winkler wants us to stay the course". Governor of California. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  111. ^ Winkler, Henry (May 7, 2020). "Tweet: Henry Winkler Video". Governor of California. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  112. ^ a b Todisco, Eric (March 29, 2021). "Henry Winkler Returns as 'The Fonz' — Watch the Virtual Happy Days Table Read Here". People Magazine. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  113. ^ "Actor Henry Winkler Plays Not My Job". Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!. NPR. November 23, 2011. Archived from the original on September 5, 2021. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  114. ^ TV Guide Guide to TV. Barnes and Noble. 2004. p. 651. ISBN 0-7607-5634-1.
  115. ^ "100 Greatest TV Characters". Channel 4. Archived from the original on May 31, 2009. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  116. ^ Clark, Rebecca (September 16, 2021). "Anderson Cooper Wishes His Parents and Truman Capote Could Reconcile Over Dinner". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 18, 2021. Retrieved September 17, 2021.
  117. ^ "Henry Winkler Donates his Jacket, NMHT". National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  118. ^ MacGregor, Jeff (September 2017). "Why 'Happy Days' — and the Fonz — Never Truly 'Jumped the Shark'". Smithsonian. Archived from the original on August 31, 2021. Retrieved September 10, 2021.
  119. ^ Bumiller, Elizabeth (February 14, 1980). "Exhibit A-a-a-a-y: 'The Fonz'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  120. ^ "Henry Winkler Receives a Hollywood Walk of Fame Star". Getty Images. Archived from the original on September 1, 2021. Retrieved August 29, 2021.
  121. ^ "Henry Winkler unveils bronze Fonz". BBC. August 20, 2008. Archived from the original on August 28, 2008. Retrieved August 16, 2010.
  122. ^ Michaelson, Judith (April 11, 2015). "Henry Winkler's Dyslexia Mission". LA Parent. Archived from the original on September 6, 2021. Retrieved September 6, 2021.
  123. ^ "Henry Winkler, the Fonz in Happy Days, appointed OBE". BBC News. September 15, 2011. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. Retrieved September 15, 2011.
  124. ^ "Henry Winkler receives honorary OBE for services to children with special educational needs and dyslexia". UK Department of Education. February 11, 2011. Archived from the original on September 10, 2011. Retrieved September 11, 2011.
  125. ^ "HRH The Duchess of Cornwall hosts reception to celebrate the UK's top 10 Literacy Heroes". National Literacy Trust. December 3, 2013. Archived from the original on January 4, 2014. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  126. ^ Block, Alex (2019). "Henry Winkler's Coolest Role is Helping Kids Fly" (PDF). Los Angeles Press Club. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 6, 2021. Retrieved September 6, 2021.
  127. ^ Alter, Jonathon (June 24, 2021). "Ruminating with Henry Winkler". OldGoats.com. Archived from the original on September 27, 2021. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  128. ^ de Moraes, Lisa; Blyth, Antonia; Hipes, Patrick (January 13, 2019). "Critics' Choice Awards: 'Roma' Wins Best Picture To Lead Night; 'The Americans' & 'Mrs. Maisel' Top TV – The Complete Winners List". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on November 17, 2020. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  129. ^ "The National Television Academy Presents The 32nd Annual Daytime Emmy Awards" (PDF). Archived from the original on March 17, 2007. Retrieved September 7, 2021.
  130. ^ "The Other Side of Henry Winkler: My Story". WorldCat. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  131. ^ "I've Never Met an Idiot on the River: Reflections on Family, Photography and Fly-Fishing". WorldCat. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  132. ^ "The Fonz: The Henry Winkler Story". WorldCat. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.
  133. ^ "The Fonz & Henry Winkler: His Real Life Story". WorldCat. Archived from the original on October 4, 2021. Retrieved October 4, 2021.

External linksEdit

VideosEdit