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Finland at the 2014 Winter Olympics

Finland competed at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia from 7 to 23 February 2014. The Finnish team consisted of 103 competitors who participated in alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing, freestyle skiing, ice hockey, ski jumping, snowboarding and speed skating.

Finland at the
2014 Winter Olympics
Flag of Finland.svg
IOC codeFIN
NOCFinnish Olympic Committee
Websitesport.fi/olympiakomitea (in Finnish) ‹See Tfd›(in Swedish)
in Sochi
Competitors103[1] in 9 sports
Flag bearer Enni Rukajärvi (opening)[2][3]
Iivo Niskanen (closing)[4]
Medals
Ranked 18th
Gold
1
Silver
3
Bronze
1
Total
5
Officials123[5]
Winter Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
1906 Intercalated Games

Contents

MedalistsEdit

Preparations by the Finnish Olympic CommitteeEdit

Financial coaching supportEdit

The Finnish Olympic Committee launched its Sochi 2014 coaching program in June 2010, distributing financial support in winter sports to member federations and top level athletes directly.[6]

Coaching support in euros per discipline by season
2010–2011[7] 2011–2012[8] 2012–2013[9] 2013–2014[10] Total 2010 total[11]
Alpine skiing 140,000 150,000 150,000 245,000 685,000 490,000
Biathlon 13,000 70,000 70,000 119,000 272,000 190,000
Cross-country skiingx 180,000 [12] 210,000 200,000 275,000 865,000 667,000
Curling [13] 0 [14] 30,000 [15] 30,000 [16] 25,000 85,000 55,000
Figure skating 80,000 80,000 80,000 120,000 360,000 161,000
Freestyle skiing 80,000 100,000 110,000 182,000 472,000 460,000
Women's ice hockey [13] 180,000 [14] 200,000 [15] 190,000 [16] 190,000 760,000 640,000
Nordic combined 80,000 30,000 40,000 109,000 259,000 440,000
Ski jumping 80,000 80,000 80,000 130,000 370,000 440,000
Snowboarding 100,000 120,000 135,000 235,000 590,000 145,000
Speed skating 30,000 70,000 100,000 190,000 390,000 365,000
Total 963,000 1,140,000 1,185,000 1,820,000 5,108,000 4,053,000
x including ski maintenance, which contributes to biathlon and Nordic combined as well

Ban on rainbow nailsEdit

In August 2013, Helsingin Sanomat quoted the President of the Board of the Finnish Olympic Committee Risto Nieminen, that it is forbidding its athletes the rainbow-patterned fingernails in the upcoming games, ruling it political abuse of the Olympic Charter. The issue was raised after high-jumper Emma Green Tregaro displayed her rainbow nails and the Finnish Minister of Culture and Sport Paavo Arhinmäki waved the rainbow flag in the Moscow 2013 World Championships in Athletics in support of LGBT rights in Russia.[17] Arhinmäki responded, that the Olympic movement should defend, not limit, the freedom of speech, and the Minister for European Affairs and Foreign Trade of Finland Alexander Stubb commented that the issue is about human rights, not politics, both bringing up the 1968 Olympics Black Power salute as one of the finest moments in Olympic history.[18][19] The Committee followed up, that they were simply quoting the Charter, which bans political abuse, and themselves couldn't allow or disallow the nails.[20][21]

Athlete prize bonusesEdit

The Finnish Olympic Committee offers prize bonuses for medalists: €30,000 for gold, €15,000 for silver and €10,000 for bronze, where in team events the price has to be divided between athletes, with a cap of €60,000 per athlete. The exception is for an ice hockey medal where the bonus is €60,000 for gold, €40,000 for silver and €30,000 for bronze.[22][23]

BudgetEdit

The cost of the games for the Finnish Olympic Committee is 1.2 million euros. About half of it, food and accommodation expenses, will be subsidised by the International Olympic Committee.[5]

Finnish Olympic teamEdit

The Finnish Olympic team in Sochi consists of 226 people, of which 16 are the team's general leadership, 103 athletes, and 107 other staff members, such as coaches, masseurs, physiotherapists and physicians.[5]

Competitors from Finland per sport excluding reserves
Sport Men Women Total 2010 total[24]
Alpine skiing 3 1 4   4
Biathlon 2 2 4   4
Cross-country skiing 8 7 15   17
Figure skating 0 0 0   3
Freestyle skiing 10 0 10   4
Ice hockey 25 21 46   41
Nordic combined 4 N/A 4   4
Ski jumping 5 1 6   5
Snowboarding 8 3 11   5
Speed skating 3 0 3   4
Total 68 35 103   91

Athlete selection methodEdit

Athletes to the Olympic team are picked by the Elite Sports Unit of the Finnish Olympic Committee based on presentations by the national sports federations. The Unit is led by Mika Kojonkoski. It revised the selection from earlier games by creating a continuous method, where athletes are added as they display to fulfill requirements. The athletes are required to

  1. have a realistic chance to finish in the top 16 in an individuals' event or in the top 8 in a team event, or
  2. be in the career's development phase with a prospect to become a major international athlete

based on their results in the current and previous season. The Committee considered the bar raised from the preceding games.[25]

Schedule for selection publication:[25]

  1. 30 October 2013: first 10 athletes nominated in alpine skiing, biathlon, freestyle skiing, snowboarding and speed skating[22][23]
  2. 16 December 2013: 14 athletes nominated in cross-country skiing, Nordic combined, ski jumping and snowboarding[26]
  3. 18 December 2013: women's ice hockey team of 21 players nominated[27]
  4. 7 January 2014: men's ice hockey team of 25 players nominated[28][29]
  5. 13 January 2014: 8 athletes nominated in cross-country skiing and ski jumping[30][31]
  6. 21 January 2014: 22 athletes nominated in biathlon, freestyle skiing, snowboarding, ski jumping and Nordic combined[32]
  7. 27 January 2014: final 7 athletes nominated in alpine skiing, freestyle skiing, snowboarding and speed skating[1]

Appearance recordsEdit

For Janne Ahonen and Teemu Selänne, 2014 will be their sixth Olympic games, tying them for the most Olympic appearances for Finns with Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi, Harri Kirvesniemi and Raimo Helminen.[33] Selänne will be alongside Helminen the only ice hockey player with six appearances, Selänne already being the all-time Olympic point-leader.[34]

Sports without participation by FinlandEdit

Finland will not compete in bobsleigh, curling, figure skating, luge, short track speed skating and skeleton. For figure skating Finland has the 2nd stand-by entry for ladies' singles, 4th for ice dancing and 7th for men's singles. The entries may not be transferred after 27 January 2014.[35] Finland failed to qualify the curling team at the Olympic qualification event.[36]

Medal count predictions and expectationsEdit

The Finnish Olympic Committee set no official medal target.[37]

An article published by International Associations of Sports Economists / North American Association of Sports Economists in 2011, using such parameters as population, political regime, snow coverage and winter sports facilities, predicted Finland to win 5 medals.[38]

In a poll ordered by MTV3, a majority from a sample of 1,700 Finns in December 2013 expected Finland to win 2–4 medals, having best chances in snowboarding.[39]

Infostrada Sports predicts that Finland will win one gold and five bronzes, broken down:[40]

Associated Press projected Finland to win two silvers and three bronzes, broken down:[41]

Ilta-Sanomat expected certain Finnish medals as a top two finish in women's team sprint, a silver in women's 4 × 5 kilometre relay, a medal in women's ice hockey and possibly multiple medals for Kaisa Mäkäräinen.[42]

PricewaterhouseCoopers, using regression analysis with such variables as gross domestic product and climate to estimate medal shares, predicted Finland to win 6 medals.[43]

Alpine skiingEdit

Finland has qualified a total quota of four athletes by the International Ski Federation (FIS), based on qualification points awarded in races within the FIS Calendar during the period of July 2012–19 January 2014. National quotas per each Olympic event were allocated according to points awarded in these competitions.[44][45] Andreas Romar was initially selected to the Finnish Olympic team, but declared absent on January 10, 2014, following his heel fracture.[46]

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Santeri Paloniemi Men's slalom 49.57 31 DNF
Marcus Sandell Men's giant slalom DNF
Samu Torsti 1:23.59 25 1:24.38 =17 2:47.97 21
Tanja Poutiainen Women's giant slalom 1:20.12 12 1:19.76 21 2:39.88 =14
Women's slalom 54.94 13 53.07 16 1:48.01 12

BiathlonEdit

Finland has qualified a total quota of four athletes by the International Biathlon Union (IBU), based on Nation Cup points won in 2012 and 2013 Biathlon World Championships during the qualification period of 16 November 2012 – 19 January 2014. There were no event-specific requirements.[47][48]

Athlete Event Time Misses Rank
Jarkko Kauppinen Men's sprint 27:57.8 3 (2+1) 78
Men's individual DNF 5 (3+2) DNF
Ahti Toivanen Men's sprint 26:58.6 2 (1+1) 62
Men's individual 55:55.4 3 (1+1+1) 56
Mari Laukkanen Women's sprint 22:37.3 2 (0+2) 36
Women's pursuit DNS
Women's individual DNS
Kaisa Mäkäräinen Women's sprint 22:18.4 2 (0+2) 30
Women's pursuit 31:02.3 3 (0+0+2+1) 16
Women's individual 46:02.5 3 (0+1+0+2) 9
Women's mass start 36:27.1 2 (0+0+1+1) 6

Cross-country skiingEdit

Finland has awarded a total quota of seventeen athletes by International Ski Federation (FIS), based on qualification points awarded in races within the FIS Calendar during the period of July 2012–19 January 2014. National quotas per each Olympic event were allocated according to points awarded in these competitions.[44][49]

Distance
Men
Athlete Event Classical Freestyle Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Deficit Rank
Matti Heikkinen 15 km classical N/A 40:17.8 +1:48.1 20
30 km skiathlon 36:40.3 23 34:39.2 48 1:11:52.6 +3:37.2 40
50 km freestyle N/A 1:47:35.0 +39.8 15
Sami Jauhojärvi 15 km classical N/A 40:14.4 +1:44.7 17
30 km skiathlon 36:54.3 31 33:46.8 36 1:11:12.0 +2:56.6 33
Martti Jylhä 50 km freestyle N/A DNF
Lari Lehtonen 30 km skiathlon 37:30.8 42 33:31.3 33 1:11:34.1 +3:18.7 38
50 km freestyle N/A 1:47:48.7 +53.5 23
Iivo Niskanen 15 km classical N/A 39:08.7 +39.0 4
30 km skiathlon 36:42.3 26 33:07.8 29 1:10:22.0 +2:06.6 26
50 km freestyle N/A 1:47:27.5 +32.3 10
Ville Nousiainen 15 km classical N/A 40:52.6 +2:22.9 28
Matti Heikkinen
Sami Jauhojärvi
Lari Lehtonen
Iivo Niskanen
4×10 km relay N/A 1:30:28.4 +1:46.4 6
Women
Athlete Event Classical Freestyle Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Deficit Rank
Anne Kyllönen 10 km classical N/A 29:52.8 +1:35.0 14
15 km skiathlon 19:30.3 11 21:12.9 47 41:18.9 +2:45.3 33
Krista Lähteenmäki 10 km classical N/A 29:36.0 +1:18.2 10
15 km skiathlon 19:27.6 10 20:07.7 24 40:09.9 +1:36.3 13
30 km freestyle N/A 1:13:37.6 +2:32.4 18
Kerttu Niskanen 10 km classical N/A 29:16.7 +58.9 8
15 km skiathlon 19:17.4 7 19:45.9 14 39:35.3 +1:01.7 7
30 km freestyle N/A 1:12:26.9 +1:21.7 4
Riitta-Liisa Roponen 30 km freestyle N/A 1:14:51.6 +3:46.4 26
Aino-Kaisa Saarinen 10 km classical N/A 28:48.1 +30.3 4
15 km skiathlon 19:12.4 5 19:02.3 5 38:48.9 +15.3 5
30 km freestyle N/A 1:13:52.5 +2:47.3 21
Anne Kyllönen
Krista Lähteenmäki
Kerttu Niskanen
Aino-Kaisa Saarinen
4×5 km relay N/A 53:03.2 +0.5  
Sprint
Men
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Martti Jylhä Sprint 3:34.49 12 Q 3:37.98 5 Did not advance
Juho Mikkonen 3:40.72 43 Did not advance
Ville Nousiainen 3:37.52 25 Q 3:40.84 5 Did not advance
Anssi Pentsinen 3:38.66 34 Did not advance
Sami Jauhojärvi
Iivo Niskanen
Team sprint N/A 23:26.13 1 Q 23:14.89  
Women
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Anne Kyllönen Sprint 2:35.57 11 Q 2:37.07 4 Did not advance
Mona-Liisa Malvalehto 2:40.08 28 Q 2:41.20 6 Did not advance
Mari Laukkanen 2:39.06 24 Q 2:37.48 3 Did not advance
Riikka Sarasoja-Lilja 2:41.55 37 Did not advance
Kerttu Niskanen
Aino-Kaisa Saarinen
Team sprint N/A 16:42.15 1 Q 16:13.14  

Freestyle skiingEdit

Finland has awarded a total quota of 9 athletes (all in men's events) by the International Ski Federation (FIS), based on competitions in the International FIS Calendar during the qualification period of July 2012–19 January 2014. National quotas per each Olympic event were allocated according to points awarded in these competitions.[44][49][50][51] On January 31, 2014, a fourth slopestyle spot was allocated to the team after a scheduling and calculation adjustment.[52]

Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank
Antti-Jussi Kemppainen Men's halfpipe 79.40 60.40 79.40 9 Q 74.40 78.20 78.20 8
Moguls
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 1 Run 2 Run 3
Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank
Arttu Kiramo Men's moguls 27.18 3.91 9.09 26 26.17 13.07 18.73 12 Did not advance
Ville Miettunen DNF DNS Did not advance
Jussi Penttala 24.86 11.71 17.99 23 DNF Did not advance
Jimi Salonen 24.53 13.21 19.64 20 25.26 15.76 21.85 3 Q 24.77 14.43 20.75 18 Did not advance
Ski cross
Athlete Event Seeding Round of 16 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Jouni Pellinen Men's ski cross 1:17.41 9 1 Q 4 Did not advance 13

Qualification legend: FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round

Slopestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank
Lauri Kivari Men's slopestyle 45.8 2.8 45.8 29 Did not advance
Antti Ollila 81.4 31.6 81.4 13 Did not advance
Aleksi Patja 10.8 12.0 12.0 31 Did not Advance
Otso Räisänen 59.6 56.2 59.6 25 Did not advance

Ice hockeyEdit

 
Finland's ice hockey jerseys at the 2014 Olympics, designed by Nike[53]

Finland is defending the men's and women's bronze medals won in the previous games.[54][55][56]

Men's tournamentEdit

Governing body of the Olympic ice hockey is the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF). Top 9 teams in the men's IIHF World Ranking of 2012 qualified directly to the games, Finland ranking 2nd.[57][58][59]

Roster

The following players are in the reserve, in case of injuries before the games begin:[60]

Saku Koivu refused a spot in the team due to a concussion suffered in November 2013.[61]

The Finnish roster for the men's ice hockey tournament of the 2014 Winter Olympics was published on 7 January 2014. The players were picked by the head coach Erkka Westerlund.[62][29][63][64]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2013–14 team
3 D Olli Määttä 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 22 August 1994 Jyväskylä   Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
4 D Ossi Väänänen 191 cm (6 ft 3 in) 99 kg (218 lb) 18 August 1980 Vantaa   Jokerit (KHL)
5 D Lasse Kukkonen 183 cm (6 ft 0 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 18 September 1981 Oulu   Oulun Kärpät (Liiga)
6 D Sami Salo 190 cm (6 ft 3 in) 93 kg (205 lb) 2 September 1974 Turku   Tampa Bay Lightning (NHL)
8 F Teemu SelänneC 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 3 July 1970 Helsinki   Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
12 F Olli Jokinen 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 5 December 1978 Kuopio   Winnipeg Jets (NHL)
15 F Tuomo Ruutu 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 16 February 1983 Vantaa   Carolina Hurricanes (NHL)
16 F Aleksander Barkov 190 cm (6 ft 3 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 2 September 1995 Tampere   Florida Panthers (NHL)
18 D Sami Lepistö 186 cm (6 ft 1 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 17 October 1984 Espoo   Avtomobilist Yekaterinburg (KHL)
21 F Jori Lehterä 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 97 kg (214 lb) 23 December 1987 Helsinki   HC Sibir Novosibirsk (KHL)
23 F Sakari Salminen 177 cm (5 ft 10 in) 75 kg (165 lb) 31 May 1988 Pori   Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod (KHL)
26 F Jarkko Immonen 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 19 April 1982 Rantasalmi   Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod (KHL)
27 F Petri Kontiola 182 cm (6 ft 0 in) 92 kg (203 lb) 4 October 1984 Seinäjoki   Traktor Chelyabinsk (KHL)
28 F Lauri Korpikoski 185 cm (6 ft 1 in) 88 kg (194 lb) 28 July 1986 Turku   Phoenix Coyotes (NHL)
31 G Antti Niemi 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 29 August 1983 Vantaa   San Jose Sharks (NHL)
32 G Kari Lehtonen 193 cm (6 ft 4 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 16 November 1983 Helsinki   Dallas Stars (NHL)
36 F Jussi Jokinen 181 cm (5 ft 11 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 1 April 1983 Kalajoki   Pittsburgh Penguins (NHL)
38 D Juuso Hietanen 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 14 June 1985 Hämeenlinna   Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod (KHL)
40 G Tuukka Rask 187 cm (6 ft 2 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 10 March 1987 Savonlinna   Boston Bruins (NHL)
41 F Antti Pihlström 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) 22 October 1984 Vantaa   Salavat Yulaev Ufa (KHL)
44 D Kimmo TimonenA 177 cm (5 ft 10 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 18 March 1975 Kuopio   Philadelphia Flyers (NHL)
45 D Sami Vatanen 177 cm (5 ft 10 in) 79 kg (174 lb) 3 June 1991 Jyväskylä   Anaheim Ducks (NHL)
50 F Juhamatti Aaltonen 184 cm (6 ft 0 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 4 June 1985 Ii   Oulun Kärpät (Liiga)
64 F Mikael Granlund 179 cm (5 ft 10 in) 83 kg (183 lb) 26 February 1992 Oulu   Minnesota Wild (NHL)
71 F Leo KomarovA 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) 90 kg (200 lb) 23 January 1987 Narva, Soviet Union   HC Dynamo Moscow (KHL)

Forwards Mikko Koivu and Valtteri Filppula were also selected but were unable to participate due to injury. They were replaced by Jarkko Immonen and Sakari Salminen respectively.


Group standings

Finland will play in Group B. All times are local (UTC+4).

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
  Canada 3 2 1 0 0 11 2 +9 8
  Finland 3 2 0 1 0 15 7 +8 7
  Austria 3 1 0 0 2 7 15 −8 3
  Norway 3 0 0 0 3 3 12 −9 0
13 February 2014
12:00
Finland  8–4
(4–2, 2–0, 2–2)
  AustriaBolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 5,664

14 February 2014
21:00
Norway  1–6
(0–3, 0–2, 1–1)
  FinlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 3,018

16 February 2014
21:00
Finland  1–2 (OT)
(0–1, 1–0, 0–0, 0–1)
  CanadaBolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 11,263
Quarterfinal
19 February 2014
16:30
Finland  3–1
(2–1, 1–0, 0–0)
  RussiaBolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 11,654
Semifinal
21 February 2014
16:00
Sweden  2–1
(0–0, 2–1, 0–0)
  FinlandBolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 9,476
Bronze medal game
22 February 2014
19:00
United States  0–5
(0–0, 0–2, 0–3)
  Finland  Bolshoy Ice Dome, Sochi
Attendance: 9,052

Teemu Selänne, at age 43 years and 234 days, became the oldest ice hockey player to win an Olympic medal. He also holds the Olympic record for total ice hockey points, upping it to 43.[65] He also shares the record for most appearances in ice hockey at the Olympics, appearing in 6.[66]

Women's tournamentEdit

Top 6 teams in the women's IIHF World Ranking of 2012 qualified directly to the games, Finland ranking 3rd.[58][67]

Roster

The Finnish roster for the women's ice hockey tournament of the 2014 Winter Olympics was published on 18 December 2013. The players were picked by the head coach Mika Pieniniemi.[68][69]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2013–14 team
1 G Eveliina Suonpää 173 cm (5 ft 8 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 12 April 1995 Kiukainen   Team Oriflame Kuortane (SM-sarja)
3 D Emma Terho 159 cm (5 ft 3 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 17 December 1981 Washington, USA   Espoo Blues (SM-sarja)
4 D Rosa Lindstedt 186 cm (6 ft 1 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 24 January 1988 Ylöjärvi   JYP Jyväskylä (SM-sarja)
5 D Anna Kilponen 169 cm (5 ft 7 in) 74 kg (163 lb) 16 May 1995 Orivesi   Team Oriflame Kuortane (SM-sarja)
6 D Jenni HiirikoskiC 162 cm (5 ft 4 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 30 March 1987 Lempäälä   JYP Jyväskylä (SM-sarja)
7 D Mira Jalosuo 184 cm (6 ft 0 in) 80 kg (180 lb) 3 February 1989 Lieksa   SKIF Nizhny Novgorod (RWHL)
9 F Venla Hovi 169 cm (5 ft 7 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 28 October 1987 Tampere   KalPa Kuopio (SM-sarja)
10 F Linda Välimäki 166 cm (5 ft 5 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 31 May 1990 Ylöjärvi   Espoo Blues (SM-sarja)
11 F Anniina Rajahuhta 164 cm (5 ft 5 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 8 March 1989 Helsinki   Espoo Blues (SM-sarja)
13 F Riikka Välilä 160 cm (5 ft 3 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 12 June 1973 Jyväskylä   JYP Jyväskylä (SM-sarja)
15 F Minttu Tuominen 165 cm (5 ft 5 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 26 June 1990 Helsinki   Espoo Blues (SM-sarja)
16 F Vilma Tanskanen 175 cm (5 ft 9 in) 66 kg (146 lb) 14 April 1995 Helsinki   Team Oriflame Kuortane (SM-sarja)
18 G Meeri Räisänen 170 cm (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 2 December 1989 Tampere   JYP Jyväskylä (SM-sarja)
20 D Saija Tarkki 172 cm (5 ft 8 in) 60 kg (130 lb) 29 December 1982 Oulu   Oulun Kärpät (SM-sarja)
21 F Michelle Karvinen 166 cm (5 ft 5 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 27 March 1990 Rødovre, Denmark   University of North Dakota (NCAA)
23 F Nina Tikkinen 170 cm (5 ft 7 in) 66 kg (146 lb) 6 February 1987 Salo   Oulun Kärpät (SM-sarja)
29 F Karoliina Rantamäki 163 cm (5 ft 4 in) 65 kg (143 lb) 23 February 1978 Vantaa   SKIF Nizhny Novgorod (RWHL)
41 G Noora Räty 165 cm (5 ft 5 in) 70 kg (150 lb) 29 May 1989 Espoo   Ilves Tampere (SM-sarja)
77 F Susanna Tapani 177 cm (5 ft 10 in) 64 kg (141 lb) 2 March 1993 Laitila   University of North Dakota (NCAA)
80 D Tea Villilä 168 cm (5 ft 6 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 16 April 1991 Hyvinkää   Minnesota–Duluth Bulldogs (NCAA)
96 F Emma Nuutinen 176 cm (5 ft 9 in) 73 kg (161 lb) 7 December 1996 Helsinki   Espoo Blues (SM-sarja)
Group standings

Finland will play in Group A. All times are local (UTC+4).

Team
GP W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts
  Canada 3 3 0 0 0 11 2 +9 9
  United States 3 2 0 0 1 14 4 +10 6
  Finland 3 0 1 0 2 5 9 −4 2
   Switzerland 3 0 0 1 2 3 18 −15 1
8 February 2014
12:00
United States  3–1
(1–0, 2–0, 0–1)
  FinlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,135

10 February 2014
19:00
Finland  0–3
(0–0, 0–0, 0–3)
  CanadaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,837

12 February 2014
12:00
Switzerland   3–4 OT
(0–2, 2–1, 1–0)
(OT 0–1)
  FinlandShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,211
Quarterfinal
15 February 2014
12:00
Finland  2–4
(0–0, 1–0, 1–4)
  SwedenShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,917
5th-8th place semifinal
16 February 2014
12:00
Finland  2–1
(2–0, 0–1, 0–0)
  GermanyShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 2,009
5th place game
18 February 2014
16:30
Finland  4–0
(2–0, 0–0, 2–0)
  RussiaShayba Arena, Sochi
Attendance: 4,112

Nordic combinedEdit

Finland has awarded a total quota of 4 athletes and a spot in the team relay, based on points achieved in the FIS Nordic Combined World Cup and secondarily in the FIS Nordic Combined Continental Cup during the qualification period of July 2012–19 January 2014.[44][49][70]

Athlete Event Ski jumping Cross-country Total
Distance Points Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ilkka Herola Normal hill/10 km 94.0 111.9 29 23:41.9 9 24:59.9 16
Large hill/10 km 126.5 106.8 16 22:42.2 9 24:11.2 14
Mikke Leinonen Normal hill/10 km 92.0 106.7 37 25:30.3 37 27:09.3 40
Large hill/10 km 118.5 89.9 42 24:43.4 41 27:19.4 42
Janne Ryynänen Normal hill/10 km 93.5 108.2 31 25:01.0 33 26:24.0 36
Large hill/10 km 117.0 91.7 40 24:16.9 37 26:45.9 40
Eetu Vähäsöyrinki Normal hill/10 km 94.5 112.4 26 25:32.7 38 26:48.7 38
Large hill/10 km 124.5 99.3 =27 24:25.2 39 26:24.2 38
Ilkka Herola
Mikke Leinonen
Janne Ryynänen
Eetu Vähäsöyrinki
Team large hill/4×5 km Did not start

Ski jumpingEdit

Finland has qualified a total quota of six athletes (five men and one woman) by the International Ski Federation (FIS), based on their performances at the FIS Ski Jumping World Cup and secondarily on the Continental Cup results during the qualification period of July 2012–19 January 2014.[44][49][71]

Men
Athlete Event Qualification First round Final Total
Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Points Rank
Janne Ahonen Normal hill 89.0 107.8 27 Q 97.0 118.9 29 92.5 110.3 28 229.2 29
Large hill 126.5 62.7 11 Q 126.0 119.8 20 Q 123.0 121.5 19 241.3 22
Anssi Koivuranta Normal hill 89.5 104.5 37 Q 99.5 126.1 13 101.5 126.7 6 252.8 12
Large hill 128.5 66.3 5 Q 131.5 130.9 5 Q 121.5 119.7 21 250.6 11
Jarkko Määttä Normal hill 91.5 104.6 36 Q 96.5 116.9 32 Did not advance
Large hill 118.0 47.4 33 Q 124.0 101.3 43 Did not advance
Olli Muotka Normal hill 91.0 107.0 30 Q 92.5 113.0 38 Did not advance
Large hill 128.5 66.3 12 Q 124.5 108.9 33 Did not advance
Janne Ahonen
Anssi Koivuranta
Jarkko Määttä
Olli Muotka
Team large hill N/A 505.5 461.5 8 Q 512 481.3 8 942.8 8
Women
Athlete Event First round Final Total
Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Points Rank
Julia Kykkänen Normal hill 95.5 115.1 14 93.5 106.4 20 221.5 17

SnowboardingEdit

Finland has awarded a total quota of 13 spots (10 in men's events and 3 in women's) by the International Ski Federation (FIS) based on competitions in the International FIS Calendar during the period of July 2012–9 January 2014.[44][72] On 31 January 2014, slopestyle snowboarder Petja Piiroinen was originally selected to the Finnish Olympic team, but was relegated into a reserve after a scheduling adjustment.[52]

Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinal Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank
Janne Korpi Men's halfpipe 28.00 41.00 41.00 17 Did not advance
Ilkka-Eemeli Laari 49.00 52.00 52.00 18 Did not advance
Markus Malin 33.50 62.50 62.50 13 Did not advance
Peetu Piiroinen DNS Did not advance
Ella Suitiala Women's halfpipe 31.75 51.50 51.50 10 Did not advance
Slopestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Semifinal Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank
Janne Korpi Men's slopestyle 49.75 35.50 49.75 12 QS 41.00 68.50 68.50 10 Did not advance
Ville Paumola 54.75 21.25 54.25 11 QS 25.25 22.75 25.25 19 Did not advance
Peetu Piiroinen 90.75 80.00 90.75 2 QF BYE 78.50 81.25 81.25 7
Roope Tonteri 33.75 95.75 95.75 2 QF BYE 31.50 39.00 39.00 11
Merika Enne Women's slopestyle 17.00 DNS 17.00 10 QS DNS Did not advance
Enni Rukajärvi 79.00 23.75 79.00 4 QF BYE 73.75 92.50 92.50  

Qualification Legend: QF – Qualify directly to final; QS – Qualify to semifinal

Snowboard cross
Athlete Event Seeding Round of 16 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Anton Lindfors Men's snowboard cross CAN 2 Q 4 Did not advance =13
Jussi Taka CAN 5 Did not advance =33

Speed skatingEdit

Finland has awarded four spots (all in the men's events, while the nation has the first priority for a reserve spot in the women's) based on their performance at the 2013–14 ISU Speed Skating World Cup.[73][74][75]

Men
Athlete Event Race 1 Race 2 Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Pekka Koskela 500 m 35.19 15 35.41 20 70.61 17
1000 m N/A DNS
Mika Poutala 500 m 35.58 30 35.56 27 71.14 29
Tommi Pulli 1000 m N/A 1:12.16 37

MiscellaneousEdit

Sport psychologistEdit

In order to improve mental training in the team, the Finnish Olympic Committee recruited a sport psychologist, Hannaleena Ronkainen.[76] This was a part of a long-term coaching program launched in 2013 with a target to reach its fullest by 2016.[77] Mental trainer and sprinter Hanna-Maari Latvala expressed scepticism at the haste in which the project was launched, and the capability of a single psychologist to service a team of one hundred representing various sports.[78] The women's ice hockey team have a dedicated psychologist, Sari Honkanen.[37]

Limited accreditationsEdit

The staff accreditations in an Olympic team were limited by a quota based on the number of athletes, and the Finnish Olympic Committee could not send as many coaches as they wished. Some personal coaches left out, who without an accreditation would have had to attend as spectators with little personal contact with their athletes, preferred to remain in Finland and rely on telephone communications.[5] A vocal critic was Ari Saukko, the personal coach of Janne Ahonen, who was denied accreditation by the Committee, and after public complaints was offered an unsatisfactory alternative trip arrangement, which he would have had to pay for in his own expense.[79]

Political boycotts by FinnsEdit

Minister of Culture and Sport of Finland Paavo Arhinmäki decided not to participate the opening ceremony, citing human rights violations and environmental issues, but planned to visit some of the events, and objected to an athletes' boycott. President Sauli Niinistö and Prime Minister Jyrki Katainen will attend the opening ceremony.[80] The Left Youth had earlier called for a boycott on the games on behalf of Niinistö, Katainen and Arhinmäki.[81] Minister for Foreign Affairs Erkki Tuomioja opposed boycotts and wished the games to be held separate from politics.[82] However, Jari Porttila reported, that only Niinistö had been invited to the opening ceremony, and Arhinmäki had received a reservation merely for the final days of the games.[83]

See alsoEdit

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External linksEdit