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FIS Ski Jumping World Cup

The FIS Ski Jumping World Cup is the world's highest level of ski jumping and the FIS Ski Flying World Cup as the subdivisional part of the competition. It was founded by Torbjørn Yggeseth for the 1979/80 season and organized by the International Ski Federation. Ladies began competing during the 2011/12 season.[1]

Ski Jumping World Cup
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1989-0131-036, Oberwiesenthal, Jens Weißflog.jpg
Genreski jumping (1808)
ski flying (1936)
Location(s)Europe
Japan
Russia
Canada (rare)
Kazakhstan (rare)
South Korea (rare)
United States (rare)
Inaugurated27 December 1979 (27 December 1979) (men)
12 January 1992 (12 January 1992) (men's team)
3 December 2011 (3 December 2011) (ladies)
23 November 2012 (23 November 2012) (mixed)
16 December 2017 (16 December 2017) (L team)
FounderNorway Torbjørn Yggeseth
Organised byInternational Ski Federation
PeopleAustria Walter Hofer (men)
Japan Chika Yoshida (ladies)
SponsorViessmann, Konica Minolta
2018–19 FIS Ski Jumping World Cup

The rounds are hosted primarily in Europe, with regular stops in Japan and rarely in North America. These have been hosted in 20 different countries around the world for both men and ladies: Austria, Bosnia, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland and the United States.[2][nb 1]

Summer Grand Prix is the top level summer competition on plastic. The lower competitive circuits include the Continental Cup, the FIS Cup, the FIS Race and the Alpen Cup.

Contents

Global map of all world cup hostsEdit

The maps display all 64 locations around the globe that have hosted World Cup events for men (57) and ladies (20) at least one time in the history of the competition. Pyeongchang in 2017 was the latest new host.

FIS Ski Jumping World Cup (Asia)
FIS Ski Jumping World Cup (North America)

  Four Hills Tournament (1979– )   Nordic Tour (1997–2010); Raw Air (2017– )   Swiss Tour (1980–1992)   Bohemia Tour (1981–1994)   Nordic Tour (1997–2010)   FIS Team Tour (Oberstdorf included, 2009–2013)

Scoring systemEdit

Each season consists of 25–30 competitions, usually two competitions on the same hill during a weekend. One competition consists of a qualifying round; first round, with 50 competitors; and second round, with 30. Qualifying round for the main event was introduced in 1990 to limit the number of competitors: the top 10 jumpers in FIS ranking qualify directly to the first round, while the rest of the jumpers fight for the remaining 40 spots. The top 30 in the first round advance to the second round, which is held in reverse order, so the best jumper in the first round jumps last. The aggregate score in the first and second rounds determine the competition results. The top 30 are awarded World Cup points. The winner gets 100 points while number 30 receives 1 point. At team events only top 8 receive points.

Men's IndividualEdit

Seasons 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
1979/801992/93 25 20 15 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 points were not awarded
1993/94–present 100 80 60 50 45 40 36 32 29 26 24 22 20 18 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Ladies's IndividualEdit

Seasons 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
2011/12–present 100 80 60 50 45 40 36 32 29 26 24 22 20 18 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Men's teamEdit

Seasons 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
1991/921992/93 60 50 40 30 20 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
1993/941999/00 200 160 120 100 90 80 points were not awarded
2000/01–present 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 points are not being awarded

Ladies's teamEdit

Seasons 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2017/18–present 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50

Mixed teamEdit

Seasons 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
2012/132013/14 200 175 150 125 100 75 50 25

Men's standingsEdit

The table below shows the three highest ranked jumpers each year.

  • Titles Overall:
Rank Nation Wins Second Third Total
1   Austria 12 11 13 36
2   Finland 8 4 7 19
3   Poland 6 1 3 10
4   Germany 3 7 3 10
5   Norway 3 5 4 12
6   Slovenia 3 2 5
7   Czechoslovakia 1 2 1 4
8   East Germany 1 1 2
9    Switzerland 1 3 2 6
10   Sweden 1 1
11   Japan 1 3 4
12   Canada 1 2 2
13   Italy 1 1
14   Yugoslavia 1 1
Total 39 39 39 117
  • Nations Cup:
Rank Nation Wins Second Third Total
1   Austria 18 8 8 34
2   Norway 8 11 7 26
3   Finland 7 9 8 24
4   Japan 3 3 2 8
5   Germany 2 4 8 14
6   Poland 1 2 3
7   Czechoslovakia 2 2 4
8   Slovenia 1 1 2
9   East Germany 1 1
10    Switzerland 1 1
Total 39 39 39 117
  • Ski Flying:
Rank Nation Wins Second Third Total
1   Austria 7 5 5 17
2   Slovenia 6 2 2 10
3   Germany 4 2 2 8
4   Czechoslovakia 2 2
5   Norway 1 2 3 6
6    Switzerland 1 3 4
7   Japan 5 2 7
8   Finland 3 1 4
9   Poland 2 1 3
10   France 1 1
11   Italy 2 2
Total 21 22 21 64

Men's tournamentsEdit

There are other tournaments as part of the World Cup:

Ladies' standingsEdit

TitlesEdit

Men's general statisticsEdit

Events Winners
952 157

update: 2 December 2018.

Ski flying sectionEdit

Events Winners
119 46

update: 25 March 2018

Ladies' statisticsEdit

  retired female ski jumper

As of 2 December 2018

Team eventsEdit

  • updated: 25 March 2018

VariousEdit

As of 2 December 2018

World Cup winners by nationsEdit

The table below lists those nations which have won at least one World Cup race (current as of 2 December 2018).