Sweden women's national ice hockey team

The Swedish women's national ice hockey team (Swedish: Sveriges damlandslag i ishockey) or Damkronorna ("the Lady Crowns" in Swedish) represents Sweden at the International Ice Hockey Federation's IIHF World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by Swedish Ice Hockey Association. Sweden has 3,425 female players in 2011.[2]

Sweden
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Damkronorna (The Lady Crowns)
AssociationSwedish Ice Hockey Association
Head coachUlf Lundberg
AssistantsAndreas Spangberg
CaptainMichelle Lowenhielm
Most gamesGunilla Andersson (297)
Most pointsErika Holst (202)
Team colors   
IIHF codeSWE
Sweden national ice hockey team jerseys 2022 (WOG).png
Ranking
Current IIHF8 Steady (4 September 2022)[1]
Highest IIHF2 (2007)
Lowest IIHF9 (2021)
First international
United States  10–0  Sweden
(North York or Mississauga, Canada; 22 April 1987)
Biggest win
Sweden  17–0  Norway
(Haninge Municipality, Sweden; 18 March 2000)
Biggest defeat
Canada  15–1  Sweden
(Ottawa, Canada; 19 March 1990)
World Championships
Appearances20 (first in 1990)
Best result3rd place, bronze medalist(s) (2005, 2007)
European Championships
Appearances5 (first in 1989)
Best result1st place, gold medalist(s) (1996)
Olympics
Appearances7 (first in 1998)
MedalsSilver medal.svg Silver (2006)
Bronze medal.svg Bronze (2002)
International record (W–L–T)
168–181–17
Medal record
Olympic Games
Silver medal – second place 2006 Turin Team
Bronze medal – third place 2002 Salt Lake City Team
IIHF World Women's Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2005 Sweden
Bronze medal – third place 2007 Canada
IIHF European Women Championships
Gold medal – first place 1996 Russia
Silver medal – second place 1989 West Germany
Silver medal – second place 1991 Czechoslovakia
Silver medal – second place 1993 Denmark
Silver medal – second place 1995 Latvia

HistoryEdit

The Swedish team had traditionally been the fourth-best women's team in the world, behind Canada, USA and Finland. During the 1997 World Championship, Sweden qualified for the 1998 Olympic tournament in Nagano, ending up 5th.[3] However, the team has shown steady improvement since 2001, winning bronze medals at the 2002 Winter Olympics, the 2005 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, and the 2007 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, and a silver medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics. On 31 August 2011, Canada was bested by Sweden for just the second time in 66 all-time international meetings. Canada suffered from a 4–1 second-period deficit and lost by a 6–4 score. On 9 April 2019, at the 2019 World Championship in Espoo, Finland, they lost to Japan 3–2. Sweden has relegated to Division I for the first time in Women's Worlds history.[4] The current head coach is Ulf Lundberg, who was hired to replace Ylva Martinsen in 2020.[5]

RecordsEdit

  • Sweden is the first country in the history of the sport other than Canada and the United States to compete in the finals of any international women's hockey tournament.
  • On 7 November 2008, in Lake Placid, Sweden defeated Canada for the first time in women's ice hockey with the 2–1 win in overtime at 4 Nations Cup.

Tournament recordEdit

Olympic GamesEdit

  • 1998 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2002Won bronze medal  
  • 2006Won silver medal  
  • 2010 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2014 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2018 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2022 – Finished in 8th place

World ChampionshipEdit

  • 1990 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1992 – Finished in 4th place
  • 1994 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1997 – Finished in 5th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2000 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2001 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2004 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2005Won bronze medal  
  • 2007Won bronze medal  
  • 2008 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2011 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2013 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2015 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2016 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2017 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2019 – Finished in 9th place (relegated to Division IA)
  • 2020 – Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic[6]
  • 2021 – Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic[7]
  • 2022 – Finished in 7th place

European ChampionshipEdit

  • 1989 – Won silver medal  
  • 1991 – Won silver medal  
  • 1993 – Won silver medal  
  • 1995 – Won silver medal  
  • 1996 – Won gold medal  

3/4 Nations CupEdit

  • 2000 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2001 – Won bronze medal   (3 Nations Cup)
  • 2002 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2003 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2004 – Won bronze medal  
  • 2005 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2006Won bronze medal  
  • 2007 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2008Won bronze medal  
  • 2009Won bronze medal  
  • 2010 – Finished in 4th place

TeamEdit

Current rosterEdit

Roster for the 2022 IIHF Women's World Championship.[8]

Head Coach: Ulf Lundberg[9]

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Ida Boman 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (2003-04-01) 1 April 2003 (age 19)   Djurgårdens IF
3 D Anna KjellbinA 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1994-03-16) 16 March 1994 (age 28)   Luleå HF/MSSK
6 D Mira Jungåker 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (2005-07-22) 22 July 2005 (age 17)   HV71
8 D Ebba Berglund 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1998-06-13) 13 June 1998 (age 24)   Metropolitan Riveters
9 D Jessica Adolfsson 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 80 kg (180 lb) (1998-07-15) 15 July 1998 (age 24)   Linköping HC
10 D Mina Waxin 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 60 kg (130 lb) (2001-04-29) 29 April 2001 (age 21)   Brynäs IF
11 F Josefin Bouveng 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (2001-05-15) 15 May 2001 (age 21)   Minnesota Golden Gophers
12 D Maja Nylén PerssonA 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (2000-11-20) 20 November 2000 (age 21)   Brynäs IF
13 F Emma Murén 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (1998-01-17) 17 January 1998 (age 24)   Färjestad BK
16 F Linnea Johansson 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (2002-04-05) 5 April 2002 (age 20)   Linköping HC
17 F Sofie Lundin 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 22)   Ohio State Buckeyes
18 F Jenny Antonsson 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 77 kg (170 lb) (2001-12-23) 23 December 2001 (age 20)   Brynäs IF
19 F Sara Hjalmarsson 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 74 kg (163 lb) (1998-02-08) 8 February 1998 (age 24)   Providence Friars
20 D Paula Bergström 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1999-01-26) 26 January 1999 (age 23)   LIU Sharks
21 F Celine Tedenby 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1999-06-15) 15 June 1999 (age 23)   Merrimack Warriors
23 F Thea Johansson 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (2002-11-22) 22 November 2002 (age 19)   Mercyhurst Lakers
24 F Felizia Wikner-Zienkiewicz 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (1999-09-17) 17 September 1999 (age 23)   Brynäs IF
25 F Lina Ljungblom 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (2001-10-15) 15 October 2001 (age 20)   Modo Hockey
26 F Hanna Olsson 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1999-01-20) 20 January 1999 (age 23)   Frölunda HC
28 F Michelle LöwenhielmC 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1995-03-22) 22 March 1995 (age 27)   SDE Hockey
29 F Olivia Carlsson 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1995-03-02) 2 March 1995 (age 27)   Modo Hockey
30 G Emma Söderberg 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1998-02-18) 18 February 1998 (age 24)   Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs
35 G Ellen Jonsson 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1998-06-08) 8 June 1998 (age 24)   AIK

2022 Olympic Qualifying Tournament RosterEdit

Roster for the qualifying tournament for the 2022 Winter Olympics.[10]

Head Coach: Ulf Lundberg

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Sara Grahn 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1988-09-25) 25 September 1988 (age 34)   Luleå HF
3 D Anna Kjellbin 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1994-03-16) 16 March 1994 (age 28)   Luleå HF
4 D Linnea Andersson 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1998-09-30) 30 September 1998 (age 24)   HV71
5 D Johanna Fällman 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (1990-06-21) 21 June 1990 (age 32)   Luleå HF
7 D Linnea Hedin 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in) 55 kg (121 lb) (1995-01-24) 24 January 1995 (age 27)   Djurgårdens IF Hockey
8 D Ebba Berglund 1.60 m (5 ft 3 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (1998-06-13) 13 June 1998 (age 24)   AIK Stockholm
9 D Jessica Adolfsson 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 74 kg (163 lb) (1998-07-15) 15 July 1998 (age 24)   Linköpings HC
10 D Mina Waxin 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (2001-04-29) 29 April 2001 (age 21)   Brynas IF
11 F Josefin Bouveng 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (2001-05-15) 15 May 2001 (age 21)   Brynas IF
12 D Maja Nylén Persson 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (2000-11-20) 20 November 2000 (age 21)   Brynas IF
13 F Emma Muren 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (1998-01-17) 17 January 1998 (age 24)   Brynas IF
15 F Lisa Johansson 1.61 m (5 ft 3 in) 59 kg (130 lb) (1992-04-11) 11 April 1992 (age 30)   AIK IF
16 F Linnea Johansson 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 65 kg (143 lb) (2002-04-05) 5 April 2002 (age 20)   Linköpings HC
17 F Sofie Lundin 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 63 kg (139 lb) (2000-02-15) 15 February 2000 (age 22)   Djurgarden IF
19 F Sara Hjalmarsson 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) 72 kg (159 lb) (1998-02-08) 8 February 1998 (age 24)   Providence College
24 F Felizia Wikner Zienkiewicz 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1999-09-17) 17 September 1999 (age 23)   HV71
25 F Lina Ljungblom 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 79 kg (174 lb) (2001-10-15) 15 October 2001 (age 20)   Modo Hockey
26 F Hanna Olsson 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1999-01-20) 20 January 1999 (age 23)   HV71
27 F Emma Nordin 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1991-03-22) 22 March 1991 (age 31)   HC Kunlun Red Star
28 F Michelle LowenhielmC 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 64 kg (141 lb) (1995-03-22) 22 March 1995 (age 27)   SDE HF
29 F Olivia Carlsson 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in) 74 kg (163 lb) (1995-03-02) 2 March 1995 (age 27)   Modo Hockey
30 G Emma Söderberg 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1998-02-18) 18 February 1998 (age 24)   University of Minnesota Duluth
35 G Ida Bowman 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 61 kg (134 lb) (2003-04-01) 1 April 2003 (age 19)   Djurgarden IF

Famous playersEdit

Awards and honorsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "IIHF Women's World Ranking". IIHF. 4 September 2022. Retrieved 4 September 2022.
  2. ^ Profile
  3. ^ Andria Hunter (1998). "Women's Hockey in Sweden". Women's Hockey Web. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  4. ^ Lucas Aykroyd (9 April 2019). "Japan's sun shines - Sweden relegated!". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 9 April 2019.
  5. ^ "IIHF - Swedish women are back". IIHF International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 31 January 2022.
  6. ^ "Women's Worlds cancelled". iihf.com. 7 March 2020.
  7. ^ "IIHF – IIHF Council announces more cancellations". International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 18 November 2020.
  8. ^ "Damkronorna" (in Swedish). swehockey.se. 13 August 2022. Retrieved 13 August 2022.
  9. ^ "2022 IIHF Ice Hockey Women's World Championship – Team Roster: Sweden" (PDF). International Ice Hockey Federation. 24 August 2022. Retrieved 26 August 2022.
  10. ^ "IIHF - Sweden". IIHF International Ice Hockey Federation. Retrieved 1 February 2022.
  11. ^ Collins gem Hockey Facts and Stats 2009–10, p. 545, Andrew Podnieks, Harper Collins Publishers Ltd, Toronto, Canada, ISBN 978-1-55468-621-6.

External linksEdit