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The Hawaii Portal

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Hawaii (/həˈwi/ (About this soundlisten) hə-WY-ee; Hawaiian: Hawaiʻi [həˈvɐjʔi]) is a state of the United States of America. It is the only state located in the Pacific Ocean and the only state composed entirely of islands.

The state encompasses nearly the entire Hawaiian archipelago, 137 islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). The volcanic archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania. At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are, in order from northwest to southeast: Niʻihau, Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, Maui, and Hawaiʻi. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "Hawaiʻi Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago.

Hawaii is the 8th smallest geographically and the 11th least populous, but the 13th most densely populated of the 50 states. It is the only state with an Asian American plurality. Hawaii has over 1.4 million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. The state capital and largest city is Honolulu on the island of Oʻahu. The state's ocean coastline is about 750 miles (1,210 km) long, the fourth longest in the U.S., after the coastlines of Alaska, Florida, and California. Hawaii is the most recent state to join the union, on August 21, 1959. It was an independent nation until 1898.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and East Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture. Read more...

Selected article

Maui

Satellite image of Mauʻi. The shape of the island resembles the profile of a person.

The island of Mauʻi is the second-largest of the Hawaiian Islands at 727.2 square miles (1883.5 km²) and is the 17th largest island in the United States. Maui is the largest island in Maui County, which is composed of itself, Lanaʻi, Kahoʻolawe, and Molokaʻi. As of 2000, Maui had a resident population of 117,644, which is ranked third within the state behind the islands of Oʻahu and Hawaiʻi. Native Hawaiian tradition gives the origin of the island's name in the legend of Hawaiʻiloa, the Polynesian navigator attributed with discovery of the Hawaiian Islands. The story relates how he named the island of Mauʻi after his son who in turn was named for the demigod Māui, who is said to have raised all the Hawaiian Islands from the sea. The Island of Maui is also called the "Valley Isle" for the large fertile isthmus between its two volcanoes. For the full article, click here.

Selected Picture

Wildfire generated by a Pāhoehoe Lava flow on the coastal plain of Kīlauea, The Big Island of Hawaiʻi. The new lava is moving across the old surface ,which is covered with a layer of moss about an inch thick. This moss is burning, generating the smoke visible in the image.

Selected biography

Duke Kahanamoku

Duke Kahanamoku c1912.jpg

Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (August 24, 1890 – January 22, 1968), "The Big Kahuna", is generally regarded as the inventor of the modern sport of surfing. He was also an Olympic champion in swimming.

The name "Duke" is not a title, but a given name. He was named after his father, Halapu Kahanamoku, who was christened "Duke" by Bernice Pauahi Bishop in honor of Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, who was visiting Hawaii at the time of the elder man's birth in 1869. The younger "Duke," as eldest son, inherited the name.For the full article, click here.

State Facts

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Hawaii News

Wikinews Hawaii portal
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Did you know?


AMiBA 1.jpg


  • ... that hula master George Naʻope was designated a "Living Golden Treasure" by the state of Hawaii?




'Ōlelo (Language)

This section is here to highlight some of the most common words of the Hawaiian Language, ʻŌlelo, that are used in everyday conversation amongst locals.

ʻEwa

Place name west of Honolulu, used as a direction term

A common usage:

"The ʻewa-bound lanes of the freeway are backed up due to an earlier accident."


Note: The word ʻewa can also mean crooked, out of shape, imperfect, ill-fitting. The word ewa, (without the okina), means unstable, swaying, wandering; strayed.

Quotes

Kamehameha I.png

"E naʻi wale nō ʻoukou, i kuʻu pono ʻaʻole pau" — King Kamehameha I

Translation [1]

On this day...

There are no anniversaries listed for this day.

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