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The 2019 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season runs throughout 2019, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The season's first named storm, Pabuk, reached tropical storm status on January 1, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record that was held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The season's first typhoon, Wutip, reached typhoon status on February 20. Wutip further intensified into a super typhoon on February 23, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record,[1] and the strongest tropical cyclone recorded in February in the Northern Hemisphere.

2019 Pacific typhoon season
2019 Pacific typhoon season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formedDecember 31, 2018
Last system dissipatedSeason ongoing
Strongest storm
NameWutip and Lekima
 • Maximum winds195 km/h (120 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure920 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions23
Total storms11
Typhoons4
Super typhoons2 (unofficial)
Total fatalities130 total
Total damage$7.81 billion (2019 USD)
Related articles
Pacific typhoon seasons
2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean to the north of the equator between 100°E and 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones which can often result in a cyclone having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, while the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E–115°E and between 5°N–25°N regardless of whether or not a tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions that are monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

Contents

Seasonal forecastsEdit

TSR forecasts
Date
Tropical
storms
Total
Typhoons
Intense
TCs
ACE Ref.
Average (1965–2018) 26 16 9 295 [2]
May 7, 2019 27 17 10 354 [2]
July 5, 2019 25 15 8 260 [3]
August 7, 2019 26 16 8 270 [4]
Other forecasts
Date
Forecast
Center
Period Systems Ref.
February 7, 2019 PAGASA January–March 1–2 tropical cyclones [5]
February 7, 2019 PAGASA April–June 2–4 tropical cyclones [5]
July 15, 2019 PAGASA July–September 6–9 tropical cyclones [6]
July 15, 2019 PAGASA October–December 3–5 tropical cyclones [6]
2019 season Forecast
Center
Tropical
cyclones
Tropical
storms
Typhoons Ref.
Actual activity: JMA 23 11 4
Actual activity: JTWC 12 10 4
Actual activity: PAGASA 9 2 1

During the year, several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast how many tropical cyclones, tropical storms, and typhoons will form during a season and/or how many tropical cyclones will affect a particular country. These agencies included the Tropical Storm Risk (TSR) Consortium of University College London, PAGASA and Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau. The first forecast of the year was released by PAGASA on February 7, within its seasonal climate outlook for the period January–June.[5] The outlook noted that one to two tropical cyclones were expected between January and March, while two to four were expected to develop or enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility between April and June. Moreover, PAGASA predicts an 80% chance of a weak El Niño presence during February–March–April period.[5] On May 7, the TSR issued their first forecast for the season, predicting that the 2019 season would be a slightly above average season, producing 27 named storms, 17 typhoons, and ten intense typhoons.[2] One of the factors behind this is due to the possible development of a moderate El Niño anticipated within the third quarter of the year.[2]

On July 5, the TSR released their second forecast for the season, now lowering their numbers and predicting that the season would be a below-average season with 25 named storms, 15 typhoons, and eight intense typhoons.[3] The PAGASA issued their second forecast for the season on July 15, predicting six to nine tropical cyclones expected to develop or enter their area between July and September and about three to five tropical cyclones by September to December. The agency also predicted that the weak El Niño was expected to weaken towards neutral conditions by August and September 2019.[6] On August 7, the TSR released their final forecast for the season, predicting a near-normal season with 26 named storms, 16 typhoons and eight intense typhoons.[4]

Season summaryEdit

Typhoon Lekima (2019)Typhoon Wutip (2019)Tropical Storm Pabuk (2019) 

The season started with Tropical Storm Pabuk active to the east of Thailand, which had formed on the last day of 2018, becoming the earliest-forming tropical storm of the Western Pacific Ocean on record, breaking the previous record held by Typhoon Alice in 1979. The storm tracked westward for three days before crossing over to the North Indian Ocean. A weak tropical depression formed near the Philippines and was named Amang by PAGASA, but quickly degenerated into a remnant low. Typhoon Wutip (Betty) developed on February 18 and became the season's first super typhoon, becoming the strongest February typhoon on record. A month later, Tropical Depression 03W formed and was named "Chedeng" by PAGASA, which later made landfall in Mindanao and dissipated in the Sulu Sea. May was rather inactive with many tropical depressions forming but never intensifying. During late June, tropical activity fired up, as Tropical Depression Dodong formed east of Philippines which absorbed another tropical depression in the South China Sea, and intensified into tropical storm Sepat. Sepat then moved northeast and became extratropical. After Sepat, Tropical Depression 04W (Egay) formed, which dropped rainfall over the drought-stricken Luzon; but soon dissipated due to unfavorable conditions. Another tropical depression formed in the South China Sea in early July, which later became Tropical Storm Mun and made landfall in Vietnam. By late July, the season kickstarted with Tropical Storms Nari and Wipha and Typhoon Francisco, later followed by Typhoon Lekima and Krosa. Lekima and Krosa later became typhoons, with Lekima intensifying into the 2nd super typhoon of the 2019 season. 3 tropical depressions in mid-August was monitored by JMA, but only one of them intensified into Tropical Storm Bailu (Ineng).

The first half of the 2019 season proved unusually quiet. For the first time since reliable records began in 1950, no typhoons existed between February 27 and August 4.[7]

SystemsEdit

Tropical Storm PabukEdit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationDecember 31, 2018 – January 4, 2019 (Exited basin)
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  996 hPa (mbar)

A tropical disturbance formed over the southern portion of the South China Sea on December 28, 2018,[8] which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Depression 35W (Usman) on December 30.[9] Under high vertical wind shear, the low-pressure area remained disorganized until December 31 when it was upgraded to a tropical depression by both the JMA and the JTWC.[10] As it was designated 36W by the JTWC, it was unofficially the last system of the 2018 typhoon season.[11] At around 06:00 UTC on January 1, 2019, the system was upgraded to the first tropical storm of the 2019 typhoon season and named Pabuk by the JMA, surpassing Typhoon Alice in 1979 to become the earliest-forming tropical storm of the northwest Pacific Ocean on record.[12] At that time, Pabuk was about 650 km (405 miles) southeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and drifted westward slowly with a partially exposed low-level circulation center.[13]

Under marginal conditions including warm sea surface temperatures, excellent poleward outflow but strong vertical wind shear, Pabuk struggled to intensify further for over two days until it accelerated west-northwestward and entered the Gulf of Thailand on January 3, where vertical wind shear was slightly weaker. It became the first tropical storm over the gulf since Muifa in 2004. Moreover, it tried to form an eye revealed by microwave imagery.[14] On January 4, the Thai Meteorological Department reported that Pabuk had made landfall over Pak Phanang, Nakhon Si Thammarat at 12:45 ICT (05:45 UTC), although other agencies indicated a landfall at peak intensity between 06:00 and 12:00 UTC.[15] Pabuk became the first tropical storm to make landfall over southern Thailand since Linda in 1997. Shortly after 12:00 UTC, the JMA issued the last full advisory for Pabuk as it exited the basin into the North Indian Ocean.[16][17]

One of the islands in the south of Thailand, Koh Samui, appeared to have been spared much of the brunt of the storm with no confirmed deaths. Beaches were closed, but even with the bad weather approaching, tourists on the popular island in the Gulf of Thailand continued to visit bars and restaurants catering to them.[18]

In Vietnam, Pabuk caused one death,[19] and the losses were estimated at 27.87 billion (US$1.2 million).[20] Eight people in Thailand were killed,[21][22] and the losses in the country were estimated to be 5 billion bahts (US$156 million).[23] Pabuk also killed one person in Malaysia.[24]

Tropical Depression 01W (Amang)Edit

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
DurationJanuary 4 – January 22
Peak intensity55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  1004 hPa (mbar)

The JTWC upgraded a disturbance north of Bairiki to a tropical depression with the designation 01W late on January 4 and expected some intensification,[25] but it failed to develop and the JTWC downgraded it back to a disturbance on January 6.[26] The system continued drifting westwards for two weeks without development. On January 19, the JMA upgraded the low-pressure area to a tropical depression when it was already located about 200 km (120 mi) west of Palau.[27] Tropical Depression 01W (Amang) continued its westward motion for another day, turning northward on January 20, just off the coast of the southern Philippines. On January 21, Tropical Depression 01W abruptly turned southward, making landfall on Samar on January 22, before dissipating shortly afterward.

The depression indirectly triggered landslides and flash floods in Davao Oriental and Agusan del Norte, killing 10 people.[28] Damage in Davao were at 318.99 million (US$6.04 million).[29][30]

Typhoon Wutip (Betty)Edit

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
DurationFebruary 18 – March 2
Peak intensity195 km/h (120 mph) (10-min)  920 hPa (mbar)

A low-pressure area formed just south of the Marshall Islands on February 16. It then began to gradually organize while moving westward, just south of Federated States of Micronesia.[31] The system was upgraded to a tropical depression by the JMA on February 18, with the JTWC following suit on the following day, assigning the storm the identifier 02W. On February 20, the tropical depression intensified into a tropical storm and received the name Wutip from the JMA. On February 21, Wutip strengthened into a severe tropical storm, before intensifying further into a typhoon later that day.[citation needed] On February 23, Wutip intensified further, reaching its initial peak intensity as a Category 4-equivalent super typhoon with maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 185 km/h (115 mph), 1-minute sustained winds of 250 km/h (155 mph), and a minimum pressure of 925 hPa (mbar), while passing to the southwest of Guam, surpassing Typhoon Higos from 2015 as the strongest February typhoon on record.[1] Wutip underwent an eyewall replacement cycle shortly thereafter, weakening in intensity as it did so while turning to the northwest. The typhoon finished its eyewall replacement cycle on February 24 and resumed strengthening; early on February 25, Wutip reached its peak intensity as a Category 5-equivalent super typhoon, with maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 195 km/h (121 mph), 1-minute sustained winds of 260 km/h (160 mph), and a minimum central pressure of 920 hPa (27 inHg). This made Wutip the first Category 5-equivalent super typhoon recorded in the month of February.[32] This also made Wutip the strongest typhoon ever recorded in February in the Northern hemisphere[citation needed]. On February 26, Wutip entered a hostile environment with moderate wind shear and began to weaken, concurrently making another turn westward. On February 28, Wutip weakened into a tropical depression and lost most of its convection. On the same day, Wutip was given the name "Betty" by the PAGASA, as the storm entered the Philippine Sea. Soon afterward, Wutip entered a more hostile environment, with very high vertical wind shear (40–50 knots or 74–93 km/h or 46–58 mph) and lower sea surface temperatures, and the storm rapidly weakened until it dissipated on March 2.

Preliminary estimates of damage in Guam and Micronesia were at $3.3 million.[33][34]

Tropical Depression 03W (Chedeng)Edit

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
DurationMarch 14 – March 20
Peak intensity<55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  1006 hPa (mbar)

On March 14, Tropical Depression 03W formed over the Federated States of Micronesia. Over the next couple of days, the system drifted westward, while gradually organizing. Early on March 17, the tropical depression entered the PAGASA's area of responsibility in the Philippine Sea, and consequently, the agency assigned the name Chedeng to the storm, shortly before it made landfall on Palau. At 5:30 PST on March 19, Chedeng made landfall on Malita, Davao Occidental.[35] Chedeng rapidly weakened after making landfall in the Philippines, degenerating into a remnant low on March 19. Chedeng's remnants continued weakening while moving westward, dissipating over the southern Sulu Sea on March 20.

Infrastructural damage in Davao Region were at Php1.2 million (US$23,000).[36]

Tropical Storm Sepat (Dodong)Edit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Subtropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJune 24 – June 28
Peak intensity75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  994 hPa (mbar)

On June 24, the JMA began monitoring on a tropical depression that had formed well to the east of Luzon from the remnants of a separate system. On June 25, the system began curving towards the northeast; the PAGASA also began to issue warnings on the formative disturbance.[37] Rounding the periphery of a subtropical ridge of high pressure, the depression tracked towards the east-northeast through the East China Sea, intensifying some as it encountered an area of high sea surface temperatures and low wind shear.[38][39] On June 26, the cyclone left the PAGASA's area of responsibility.[40] Curved banding developed later that day as the center passed east of Okinawa.[41] Tracing the northwestern periphery of the ridge, the system curved towards the east-northeast, paralleling the southern coast of the main Japanese islands. Supported by favorable sea surface temperatures and outflow, the system was upgraded to a tropical storm at 09:00 UTC on June 27, gaining the name Sepat.[42] A peak intensity with 75 km/h (47 mph) 10-minute sustained winds was attained later that day while Sepat began to acquire extratropical characteristics.[43][44] The next day, the storm fully transitioned into an extratropical system while accelerating eastward 580 km (360 mi) east of Hitachinaka, Japan.[45] Sepat's extratropical remnants continued accelerating towards the northeast, moving into the western Bering Sea on July 1, before eventually dissipating over the Arctic Ocean early on July 5.[citation needed]

This system was not tracked by the JTWC; however, the agency classified the system as a "subtropical storm," with 1-minute sustained winds at 75 km/h (45 mph).[46] Some ferry routes and bullet trains were suspended as the storm passed near Tokyo on June 28, dropping heavy rainfall.[47] Evacuations were advised for most districts in Kagoshima due to an increased risk of landslides. In Hioki, Kagoshima, 164 mm (6.5 in) of rain fell in a six-hour period on the morning of June 28;[48] 240 mm (9.4 in) fell in Kamikatsu, Tokushima, in a 24-hour period.[49] An EF0 tornado damaged 17 structures in Gifu and Ginan.[50][51]

Tropical Depression 04W (Egay)Edit

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJune 27 – July 1
Peak intensity<55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  1000 hPa (mbar)

Early on June 27, a tropical depression formed to the southwest of the Mariana Islands. At around 21:00 Philippine Standard Time (09:00 UTC), the tropical depression entered the PAGASA's area of responsibility in the Philippine Sea, though PAGASA did not recognize the system as a tropical cyclone at the time. On June 28, the JTWC initiated advisories on the system and gave it the identifier 04W. On the next day, PAGASA named the tropical depression “Egay” and the JTWC initiated advisories on Egay as a tropical storm. On June 30, Tropical Depression Egay encountered high wind shear in the Philippine Sea and began weakening soon afterward. On July 1, Egay turned to the north-northwest and reached the southern coast of Taiwan, and both the PAGASA and the JTWC issued their final warnings on the weakening storm; Egay degenerated into a remnant low late that day. Afterward, Egay passed over northern Taiwan and continued its northward motion, before dissipating on the next day, just off the coast of China.[citation needed]

Tropical Storm MunEdit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJuly 1 – July 4
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  992 hPa (mbar)

On July 1, an area of low pressure organized into a tropical depression formed in the South China Sea, near Hainan and the Paracel Islands. The system gradually organized while drifting eastward. On the next day, the tropical depression strengthened into a tropical storm, and the JMA named the storm Mun. Later that day, Tropical Storm Mun made landfall on the island of Hainan. However, the JTWC still recognized Mun as a monsoon depression and didn’t upgrade it into a tropical cyclone for another day. Late on July 3, after the storm had nearly crossed the Gulf of Tonkin to the coast of Vietnam, the JTWC upgraded the storm to tropical storm status and initiated advisories on the system, stating that Mun had organized enough to be considered a tropical cyclone.[citation needed] Between 4:30–5:00 a.m. ICT on July 4 (21:30–22:00 UTC on July 3), Mun made landfall in Thái Bình Province in northern Vietnam.[52] Afterward, Mun moved inland while weakening, before dissipating late on July 4.

A bridge in Tĩnh Gia District was damaged by the storm, which killed 2 people and left 3 injured. Damage of an electric pole in Trấn Yên District were at 5.6 billion (US$240,000).[52]

Tropical Storm Danas (Falcon)Edit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJuly 14 – July 21
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  985 hPa (mbar)

On July 12, an area of low pressure formed near the Mariana Islands. During the next couple of days, the system slowly drifted westward while gradually organizing. Early on July 14, the low-pressure area organized into a tropical depression to the southwest of the Mariana Islands. Later that day, the tropical depression entered the Philippine area of responsibility, and the PAGASA gave the system the name Falcon. Afterward, the system continued organizing while approaching Luzon. On July 16, the tropical depression strengthened into a tropical storm, and the JMA named the system Danas. Shortly afterward, at 12:00 UTC that day, the JTWC upgraded Danas to a tropical storm. At 12:30 a.m. on July 17 (PST), PAGASA reported that Danas (Falcon) had made landfall at Gattaran, Cagayan and looped over the landmass. However, Danas's center of circulation still remained off the coast of Luzon, and the JMA and JTWC both stated that Danas did not make landfall at all. Northeasterly wind shear had displaced much of Danas' convection to the west, and an area of low pressure had formed to the east of Luzon. This led to the formation of another area of low pressure over the western Philippines. This low would later develop into Tropical Depression Goring. On July 19, the JMA reported that Danas has reached its peak intensity with winds of 85 km/h (50 mph). Later that day, Danas began to weaken. On July 20, around 13:00 UTC, Danas made landfall on North Jeolla Province, South Korea, before weakening into a tropical depression soon afterward. At 12:45 UTC on July 21, Danas transitioned into an extratropical low in the Sea of Japan, and the JMA issued their final advisory on the storm.[citation needed]

In Philippines, four people were killed after Danas triggered flooding in the country.[53] Agricultural damage in Negros Occidental were calculated at P19 million (US$372,000),[54] while agricultural damage in Lanao Norte reached P277.8 million (US$5.44 million).[55] Danas caused stormy weather across South Korea; however, its effects were relatively minor. Heavy rains amounted to 329.5 mm (12.97 in) in Geomun-do.[56] A man died after being swept away by strong waves in Geochang County.[57] Damage in South Jeolla Province were at W395 million (US$336,000),[58] while damage in Jeju Island up to W322 million (US$274,000).[59] Additionally, Danas also triggered flash flooding in Kyushu. A 11-year-old boy was killed.[60]

Tropical Depression GoringEdit

Tropical depression (JMA)
DurationJuly 17 – July 19
Peak intensity55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  996 hPa (mbar)

On July 17, a tropical depression formed from the western part of Tropical Storm Danas after it was battered by northeast wind shear, over the eastern part of the South China Sea, just off the coast of Luzon. Over the next couple of days, the system moved northeastward, and re-entered the PAGASA's Philippine Area of Responsibility, and was named Goring while the JTWC issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA) on Goring. Goring reached southern Taiwan early on July 19.[citation needed] However, the storm made landfall on Taiwan soon afterward and weakened; as a result, the JTWC cancelled the TCFA and has lowered Goring's chance for development to 'medium'.[61] Goring dissipated by 18:00 UTC on July 19 (July 20 PST), with PAGASA declaring that Goring had degenerated into a low-pressure area and discontinued advisories on the storm, and the JMA ceased advisories as well. The remnant of Goring was then merged with a new low pressure system which would eventually become a Tropical Storm Nari.[citation needed]

Tropical Storm NariEdit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJuly 24 – July 28
Peak intensity65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  998 hPa (mbar)

On July 21, the JTWC started tracking an area of low pressure associated with remnant of tropical depression Goring for the potential formation of a tropical cyclone. Under favorable conditions, the system organized itself in the next several days. At 00:00 UTC on July 24, it developed into a tropical depression to the west of the Bonin Islands. The storm gradually became more organized while moving north-northwestward. Early on July 25, the JTWC initiated advisories on the storm and gave it the identification "07W". Early on July 26, the tropical depression strengthened into a tropical storm, and the JMA named it Nari while it moved northwards. The storm approached southern Japan and as it moved inland, it weakened into a tropical depression. Several hours later, it degenerated into a remnant low. Thus, the JTWC and JMA issued their final advisories on the system.[citation needed]

Tropical Storm WiphaEdit

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
DurationJuly 30 – August 3
Peak intensity85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min)  985 hPa (mbar)

On July 30, a tropical depression formed in the South China Sea near Paracel Islands and Hainan. On the next day, it strengthened into a tropical storm, and JMA named it Wipha. By July 31, JTWC upgraded Wipha to a tropical storm.[citation needed]

In Vietnam, at least 10 people were killed and 11 went missing. Thanh Hóa Province was the worst hit province within the nation,[62] and the losses were amounted to 300 billion đồng (US$12.9 million).[63] Damage in Sơn La Province reached 28 billion đồng (US$1.21 million).[64]

Typhoon FranciscoEdit

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
DurationAugust 1 – August 7
Peak intensity130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  970 hPa (mbar)

On August 1, a tropical depression formed to the east of Mariana Islands. By midnight on August 1, the depression rapidly intensified to be Tropical Storm Francisco. Over the next few days, Francisco gradually strengthened and became a severe tropical storm on August 3. It then became a typhoon 12 hours later.[citation needed]

In anticipation of coastal flooding, 20,020 people were evacuated from Kokuraminami-ku and Moji-ku.[65] Transportation in the affected region was disrupted, with 130 flights cancelled and the Kyushu Railway Company suspending train service.[66] Striking Kyushu as a typhoon, Francisco brought heavy rain and strong winds to much of the island. Rainfall accumulations exceeded 120 mm (4.7 in) in Nobeoka and 110 mm (4.3 in) in Saiki.[67] Nobeoka observed a local hourly rainfall record of 95.5 mm (3.76 in).[66] A maximum wind gust of 143 km/h (89 mph) was observed at Miyazaki Airport,[68] the highest August wind gust on record for the city. One person drowned in a flooded river in Kokonoe.[66] Two people suffered injury after being knocked over by strong winds.[65]

Typhoon Lekima (Hanna)Edit

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
DurationAugust 2 – August 14
Peak intensity195 km/h (120 mph) (10-min)  920 hPa (mbar)

On August 2, the JMA began monitoring on a tropical depression that had developed in the Philippine Sea. The system strengthened into a tropical storm a day later, while the PAGASA named it Tropical Depression Hanna, and was given the international name Lekima. The system soon started to rapidly intensify as it moves west-northwestwards, reaching category 3-equivalent intensity on August 7 and rapid intensification helped it intensify, and soon became a super typhoon in just 2 hours. The storm underwent an eyewall replacement cycle by the following morning. It began to weaken as it did so. Around that time, it absorbed a weak Tropical Depression west of Luzon, in the South China Sea. Lekima made landfall in China by August 10, 12:30 a.m. CST and weakened into a Category 2 storm. The system continued to weaken as it moves inland. It became a severe tropical storm several hours later. Lekima then changed its trajectory from west-northwest to north, battering the East Coast of China. more than 1 million people were evacuated due to the threat of the storm and 22 were killed by it so far.[69] The system kept moving inland and weakened to a tropical depression. Soon after, Lekima started to undergo an Extratropical transition. As it did so, the JTWC discontinued advisories on it.[70]

Though Lekima, known to them as Hanna, did not directly affect the Philippines, it enhanced the southwest monsoon which caused heavy rain to the nation. Three boats sank in Guimaras Strait; 31 people died and three were left missing.[71]

Typhoon KrosaEdit

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
DurationAugust 5 – August 16
Peak intensity155 km/h (100 mph) (10-min)  950 hPa (mbar)

A tropical depression formed near Mariana Islands on August 5. By August 6, it intensified into a tropical storm, and was named Krosa by the JMA. Tropical Storm Krosa soon became a typhoon, and rapidly intensified to become a category 3-equivalent typhoon on August 8. Upwelling of cooler waters induced weakening thereafter; by August 13, Krosa weakened below typhoon intensity. Krosa continued moving, albeit slowly, towards Japan with little change in intensity. Moderately conducive conditions were unable to aid Krosa in strengthening, and it stayed the same intensity before landfall in Japan. On August 14, Krosa emerged in the Sea of Japan and a few days later on August 16 Krosa transitioned into an extratropical low.[citation needed]

The typhoon brought torrential rain to parts of Shikoku and Honshu, with accumulations peaking at 869.5 mm (34.23 in) at Yanase in Kochi Prefecture. Wind gusts reached 151 km/h (94 mph) in Muroto. Rough seas produced by the storm killed two people while flooding killed one other.[72] Fifty-five people were injured in various incidents.[73] Agricultural damage in Japan reached ¥279.61 million (US$2.64 million).[74]

Severe Tropical Storm Bailu (Ineng)Edit

Bailu (Ineng)STS
Current storm status
Severe tropical storm  (JMA)
Current storm status
Tropical storm (1-min mean)
 
Satellite image
 
Forecast map
As of:06:00 UTC, August 23
Location:19°00′N 125°18′E / 19.0°N 125.3°E / 19.0; 125.3 (Bailu (Ineng))
About 417 nmi (770 km; 480 mi) SSE of Taipei, Taiwan
Sustained winds:50 kn (95 km/h; 60 mph) (10-min mean)
45 kn (85 km/h; 50 mph) (1-min mean)
gusting to 70 kn (130 km/h; 80 mph)
Pressure:990 hPa (29.23 inHg)
Movement:NW at 13 kn (25 km/h; 15 mph)
See more detailed information.

On August 20, a tropical depression formed. On the same day, JMA issued a gale warning on it, stating the depression would strengthen into a tropical storm in 12 hours. This LPA was also monitored by PAGASA, which was eventually named Ineng by PAGASA. Early on August 21, Ineng’s still disorganized circulation trough affected the Bicol Region, Eastern Visayas and Metro Manila, causing heavy rains to the areas previously hit by strong rains from Typhoon Lekima (Hanna). An the same time, the JTWC issued a TCFA for Ineng. Later on the same day, Tropical Depression Ineng was designated as 12W by the JTWC and soon upgraded to Tropical Storm Bailu by the JMA. Despite this, Bailu still had a disorganized center.

Current storm informationEdit

As of 06:00 UTC August 23, Severe Tropical Storm Bailu (Ineng) is located near 19°00′N 125°18′E / 19.0°N 125.3°E / 19.0; 125.3 (Bailu), also about 417 nautical miles (770 km; 480 mi) south-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan. Maximum 10-minute sustained winds are at 50 knots (95 km/h; 60 mph), while maximum 1-minute sustained winds are at 45 knots (85 km/h; 50 mph), with gusts up to 70 knots (130 km/h; 80 mph). The minimum central barometric pressure is 990 hPa (29.23 inHg), and the system is moving northwestward at 13 kn (25 km/h; 15 mph).

For the latest official information, see:

Other systemsEdit

On May 2, a low-pressure area formed over the Yap Islands. On May 7, the JMA upgraded the low-pressure area to a tropical depression. On May 8, the tropical depression dissipated, and the JMA issued their final advisory on the system. On May 7, a tropical depression formed near the southwest portion of Micronesia. Over the next several days, the system slowly drifted westward, while fluctuating in intensity. On May 9, the tropical depression experienced some weakening. The weakening trend resumed on May 12, as the system drifted to the northwest. Later on the same day, the tropical depression degenerated into a remnant low. However, six hours later, on May 13, the system regenerated into a tropical depression, and the JMA re-initiated advisories on the storm. On May 15, the tropical depression degenerated into a remnant low once again. At 12:00 UTC on May 16, the storm's remnants dissipated. On May 10, another tropical depression formed to the east of Mindanao, and the JMA initiated advisories on the storm. Early on the next day, the tropical depression began to weaken, after encountering hostile conditions while continuing its westward track. On May 11, the tropical depression dissipated to the east of Mindanao.[citation needed]

On June 26, a tropical depression briefly formed in the East China Sea, near the Ryukyu Islands. Later that day, the storm was absorbed into the circulation of a nearby system which would eventually become Tropical Storm Sepat.[citation needed]

On August 6, a tropical depression formed in the South China Sea, to the west of Luzon. On August 8, the tropical depression degenerated into a remnant low, and was absorbed by larger Typhoon Lekima to its east. 2 tropical depressions were monitored by JMA, to the Taiwan Strait and out in the North Pacific. On August 17, another depression formed and the JMA started monitoring it. However, a day later, it degenerated to a remnant low.

Storm namesEdit

Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean, both the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assign names to tropical cyclones that develop in the Western Pacific, which can result in a tropical cyclone having two names.[75] The Japan Meteorological Agency's RSMC Tokyo — Typhoon Center assigns international names to tropical cyclones on behalf of the World Meteorological Organization's Typhoon Committee, should they be judged to have 10-minute sustained windspeeds of 65 km/h (40 mph).[76] PAGASA names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N and 25°N even if the cyclone has had an international name assigned to it.[75] The names of significant tropical cyclones are retired, by both PAGASA and the Typhoon Committee.[76] Should the list of names for the Philippine region be exhausted then names will be taken from an auxiliary list of which the first ten are published each season. Unused names are marked in gray.

International namesEdit

A tropical cyclone is named when it is judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 65 km/h (40 mph).[77] The JMA selected the names from a list of 140 names, that had been developed by the 14 members nations and territories of the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee.[78] Retired names, if any, will be announced by the WMO in 2020, though replacement names will be announced in 2021. The next 28 names on the naming list are listed here along with their international numeric designation, if they are used. During the season, the names Mun and Bailu was used for the first time, after it replaced the names Fitow and Haiyan, which was retired after the 2013 season, respectively.

  • Pabuk (1901)
  • Wutip (1902)
  • Sepat (1903)
  • Mun (1904)
  • Danas (1905)
  • Nari (1906)
  • Wipha (1907)
  • Francisco (1908)
  • Lekima (1909)
  • Krosa (1910)
  • Bailu (1911) (active)
  • Podul (unused)
  • Lingling (unused)
  • Kajiki (unused)
  • Faxai (unused)
  • Peipah (unused)
  • Tapah (unused)
  • Mitag (unused)
  • Hagibis (unused)
  • Neoguri (unused)
  • Bualoi (unused)
  • Matmo (unused)
  • Halong (unused)
  • Nakri (unused)
  • Fengshen (unused)
  • Kalmaegi (unused)
  • Fung-wong (unused)
  • Kammuri (unused)

PhilippinesEdit

This season, PAGASA will use its own naming scheme for tropical cyclones that either develop within or move into their self-defined area of responsibility.[79] The names were taken from a list of names last used during 2015 and are scheduled to be used again during 2023.[79] All of the names are the same except Liwayway and Nimfa, replacing the names Lando and Nona after these were retired.[79]

  • Amang
  • Betty (1902)
  • Chedeng
  • Dodong (1903)
  • Egay
  • Falcon (1905)
  • Goring
  • Hanna (1909)
  • Ineng (1911) (active)
  • Jenny (unused)
  • Kabayan (unused)
  • Liwayway (unused)
  • Marilyn (unused)
  • Nimfa (unused)
  • Onyok (unused)
  • Perla (unused)
  • Quiel (unused)
  • Ramon (unused)
  • Sarah (unused)
  • Tisoy (unused)
  • Ursula (unused)
  • Viring (unused)
  • Weng (unused)
  • Yoyoy (unused)
  • Zigzag (unused)
Auxiliary list
  • Abe (unused)
  • Berto (unused)
  • Charo (unused)
  • Dado (unused)
  • Estoy (unused)
  • Felion (unused)
  • Gening (unused)
  • Herman (unused)
  • Irma (unused)
  • Jaime (unused)

Season effectsEdit

This table summarizes all the systems that developed within or moved into the North Pacific Ocean, to the west of the International Date Line during 2019. The tables also provide an overview of a systems intensity, duration, land areas affected and any deaths or damages associated with the system.

Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Pabuk December 31, 2018 – January 4, 2019 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 996 hPa (29.41 inHg) Natuna Islands, Vietnam, Malaysia, Thailand, Myanmar $157 million 10 [19][21][22][24]
01W (Amang) January 4 – 22 Tropical depression 55 km/h (35 mph) 1004 hPa (29.65 inHg) Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Caroline Islands, Philippines $6.04 million 10 [28][30]
Wutip (Betty) February 18 – March 2 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) Caroline Islands, Mariana Islands $3.3 million None
03W (Chedeng) March 14 – 19 Tropical depression Not specified 1006 hPa (29.71 inHg) Caroline Islands, Philippines $23 thousand None [36]
TD May 7 – 8 Tropical depression Not specified 1004 hPa (29.65 inHg) Yap, Palau None None
TD May 7 – 12 Tropical depression Not specified 1004 hPa (29.65 inHg) Caroline Islands None None
TD May 10 – 11 Tropical depression Not specified 1008 hPa (29.77 inHg) Mariana Islands None None
TD May 13 – 15 Tropical depression Not specified 1006 hPa (29.71 inHg) Caroline Islands None None
Sepat (Dodong) June 24 – 28 Tropical storm 75 km/h (45 mph) 994 hPa (29.35 inHg) Japan, Aleutian Islands, Russian Far East None None
TD June 26 Tropical depression 55 km/h (35 mph) 1000 hPa (29.53 inHg) Japan, Korean Peninsula None None
04W (Egay) June 27 – July 1 Tropical depression Not specified 1006 hPa (29.71 inHg) Yap, Philippines, Taiwan, East China None None
Mun July 1 – 4 Tropical storm 65 km/h (40 mph) 992 hPa (29.29 inHg) South China, Vietnam, Laos $240 thousand 2 [52]
Danas (Falcon) July 14 – 21 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) Yap, Philippines, Taiwan, East China, Japan, Korean Peninsula, Russian Far East $6.42 million 6
Goring July 17 – 19 Tropical depression 55 km/h (35 mph) 996 hPa (29.41 inHg) Philippines, Taiwan, Ryukyu Islands None None
Nari July 24 – 28 Tropical storm 65 km/h (40 mph) 998 hPa (29.47 inHg) Japan None None
Wipha July 30 – August 3 Tropical storm 85 km/h (50 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) South China, Vietnam, Laos $14.5 million 10 [80]
Francisco August 1 – 7 Typhoon 130 km/h (80 mph) 970 hPa (28.64 inHg) Japan, Korean Peninsula Unknown 1 [66]
Lekima (Hanna) August 2 – 14 Typhoon 195 km/h (120 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) Caroline Islands, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, China $7.6 billion 89 [81][82][83][84]
Krosa August 5 – 16 Typhoon 155 km/h (100 mph) 950 hPa (28.05 inHg) Mariana Islands, Japan, Korean Peninsula, Russian Far East $2.64 million 3
TD August 6 – 8 Tropical depression 55 km/h (35 mph) 996 hPa (29.41 inHg) Philippines None None
TD August 17 – 18 Tropical depression Not specified 1006 hPa (29.71 inHg) None None None
TD August 19 – 21 Tropical depression Not specified 1004 hPa (29.65 inHg) Ryukyu Islands, Taiwan, East China None None
Bailu (Ineng) August 20 – Present Severe tropical storm 95 km/h (60 mph) 985 hPa (29.09 inHg) Philippines None None
Season aggregates
23 systems December 31, 2018 –
Season ongoing
195 km/h (120 mph) 920 hPa (27.17 inHg) >$7.8 billion 131

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit