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The 2008 Spanish general election was held on Sunday, 9 March 2008, to elect the 9th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as 208 of 264 seats in the Senate.

2008 Spanish general election

← 2004 9 March 2008 2011 →

All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies and 208 (of 264) seats in the Senate
176 seats needed for a majority in the Congress of Deputies
Opinion polls
Registered35,073,179 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.5%
Turnout25,900,439 (73.8%)
Red Arrow Down.svg1.9 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero 2009b (cropped).jpg Mariano Rajoy in 2008 (cropped).jpg Josep Antoni Duran i Lleida 2006 (cropped).jpg
Leader José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero Mariano Rajoy Josep Antoni Duran i Lleida
Party PSOE PP CiU
Leader since 22 July 2000 2 September 2003 24 January 2004
Leader's seat Madrid Madrid Barcelona
Last election 164 seats, 42.6% 148 seats, 37.7% 10 seats, 3.2%
Seats won 169 154 10
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg5 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg6 Arrow Blue Right 001.svg0
Popular vote 11,289,335 10,278,010 779,425
Percentage 43.9% 39.9% 3.0%
Swing Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.3 pp Green Arrow Up Darker.svg2.2 pp Red Arrow Down.svg0.2 pp

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Josu Erkoreka 2009 (cropped).jpg Joan Ridao (cropped).jpg Gaspar Llamazares 2011 (cropped).jpg
Leader Josu Erkoreka Joan Ridao Gaspar Llamazares
Party EAJ/PNV ERC IU
Leader since 2004 2007 29 October 2000
Leader's seat Biscay Barcelona Madrid
Last election 7 seats, 1.6% 8 seats, 2.5% 5 seats, 5.0%
Seats won 6 3 2
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg1 Red Arrow Down.svg5 Red Arrow Down.svg3
Popular vote 306,128 298,139 969,946
Percentage 1.2% 1.2% 3.8%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg0.4 pp Red Arrow Down.svg1.3 pp Red Arrow Down.svg1.2 pp

2008 Spanish election - Results.svg
Constituency results map for the Congress of Deputies

Prime Minister before election

José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
PSOE

Elected Prime Minister

José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero
PSOE

After four years of growing bipolarisation of Spanish politics, the election saw a record result for both ruling Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) and opposition People's Party (PP), together obtaining more than 83% of the vote share—over 21 million votes—and 92% of the Congress seats. The PSOE under José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero benefitted from tactical voting against the PP and emerged as the most-voted party just 7 seats short of an overall majority. On the other hand, Mariano Rajoy's PP saw an increase in its vote share and seat count but remained unable to overtake the Socialists.

United Left (IU) had its worst general election performance ever with less than 4% and 2 seats. Regional nationalist parties Convergence and Union (CiU), Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC), Basque Nationalist Party (PNV) or Aragonese Union (CHA) were also hurt by the massive tactical voting towards the PSOE, falling to historical lows of popular support. Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD), with 1 seat and slightly more than 300,000 votes, became the first nationwide party aside from PSOE, PP and IU entering in parliament in over two decades.

Zapatero was sworn in as Prime Minister of Spain for a second term in office in April 2008, just as the Spanish economy began showing signs of fatigue and economic slowdown after a decade of growth.

Future PSOE leader and Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez would be first elected deputy as a result of this election, though this would not happen until September 2009 after Pedro Solbes's resigned his seat.

Contents

OverviewEdit

Electoral systemEdit

The Spanish Cortes Generales were envisaged as an imperfect bicameral system. The Congress of Deputies had greater legislative power than the Senate, having the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a Prime Minister and to override Senate vetoes by an absolute majority of votes. Nonetheless, the Senate possessed a few exclusive, yet limited in number functions—such as its role in constitutional amendment—which were not subject to the Congress' override.[1][2] Voting for the Cortes Generales was on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprised all nationals over eighteen and in full enjoyment of their political rights.[3]

For the Congress of Deputies, 348 seats were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with a threshold of 3 percent of valid votes—which included blank ballots—being applied in each constituency. Parties not reaching the threshold were not taken into consideration for seat distribution. Additionally, the use of the D'Hondt method might result in an effective threshold over three percent, depending on the district magnitude.[4] Seats were allocated to constituencies, corresponding to the provinces of Spain. Each constituency was entitled to an initial minimum of two seats, with the remaining 248 allocated among the constituencies in proportion to their populations. Ceuta and Melilla were allocated the two remaining seats, which were elected using plurality voting.[1][5][6][7]

For the Senate, 208 seats were elected using an open list partial block voting, with electors voting for individual candidates instead of parties. In constituencies electing four seats, electors could vote for up to three candidates; in those with two or three seats, for up to two candidates; and for one candidate in single-member districts. Each of the 47 peninsular provinces was allocated four seats, whereas for insular provinces, such as the Balearic and Canary Islands, districts were the islands themselves, with the larger—Majorca, Gran Canaria and Tenerife—being allocated three seats each, and the smaller—Menorca, IbizaFormentera, Fuerteventura, La Gomera, El Hierro, Lanzarote and La Palma—one each. Ceuta and Melilla elected two seats each. Additionally, autonomous communities could appoint at least one senator each and were entitled to one additional senator per each million inhabitants.[1][5][6][7]

The electoral law provided that parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors were allowed to present lists of candidates. However, groupings of electors were required to secure the signature of at least 1 percent of the electors registered in the constituency for which they sought election. Electors were barred from signing for more than one list of candidates. Concurrently, parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to take part jointly at an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within ten days of the election being called.[5][7]

Election dateEdit

The term of each House of the Cortes Generales—the Congress and the Senate—expired four years from the date of their previous election, unless they were dissolved earlier. The election Decree was required to be issued no later than the twenty-fifth day prior to the date of expiry of the Cortes in the event that the Prime Minister did not make use of his prerogative of early dissolution. The Decree was to be published on the following day in the Official State Gazette, with election day taking place on the fifty-fourth day from publication. The previous election was held on 14 March 2004, which meant that the legislature's term would expire on 14 March 2008. The election Decree was required to be published no later than 19 February 2008, with the election taking place on the fifty-fourth day from publication, setting the latest possible election date for the Cortes Generales on Sunday, 13 April 2008.[5][7]

The Prime Minister had the prerogative to dissolve both Houses at any given time—either jointly or separately—and call a snap election, provided that no motion of no confidence was in process, no state of emergency was in force and that dissolution did not occur before one year had elapsed since the previous one. Additionally, both Houses were to be dissolved and a new election called if an investiture process failed to elect a Prime Minister within a two-month period from the first ballot.[1][6] Barred this exception, there was no constitutional requirement for simultaneous elections for the Congress and the Senate, there being no precedent of separate elections and with governments having long preferred that elections for the two Houses take place simultaneously.

The Cortes Generales were dissolved on 14 January 2008, after it was announced by President of the Regional Government of Andalusia Manuel Chaves in November 2007 that he had agreed with Zapatero to hold the 2008 Spanish general and Andalusian regional elections simultaneously on 9 March.[8][9]

Status at dissolutionEdit

The Cortes Generales were officially dissolved on 15 January 2008, after the publication of the dissolution Decree in the Official State Gazette.[10] The tables below show the status of the different parliamentary groups in both chambers at the time of dissolution.[11][12]

Congress of Deputies
Parliamentary group Deputies
Socialist Group 164[a]
People's Group in the Congress 147[b]
Convergence and Union Catalan Group 10[c]
Republican Left Group 8
PNV Basque Group 7
IU–ICV Green Left Group 5[d]
Mixed Group 9[e]
Total 350
 
Senate
Parliamentary group Senators
People's Group in the Senate 123[f]
Socialist Group 98
Catalan Agreement of Progress Group 16[g]
Basque Nationalist Senators Group 8
CiU Catalan Group in the Senate 6[h]
Canarian Coalition Senators Group 4[i]
Mixed Group 4[j]
Total 259

TimetableEdit

The key dates are listed below (all times are CET. Note that the Canary Islands use WET (UTC+0) instead):[5][7][13]

  • 14 January: The election Decree is issued with the countersign of the Prime Minister after deliberation in the Council of Ministers, ratified by the King.[10]
  • 15 January: Formal dissolution of the Cortes Generales and official start of ban period for the organization of events for the inauguration of public works, services or projects.[5]
  • 18 January: Initial constitution of Provincial and Zone Electoral Commissions.
  • 25 January: Deadline for parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to inform the relevant Electoral Commission.
  • 4 February: Deadline for parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors to present lists of candidates to the relevant Electoral Commission.
  • 6 February: Submitted lists of candidates are provisionally published in the Official State Gazette.
  • 9 February: Deadline for citizens entered in the Register of Absent Electors Residing Abroad and for citizens temporarily absent from Spain to apply for voting.
  • 10 February: Deadline for parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors to rectify irregularities in their lists.
  • 11 February: Official proclamation of valid submitted lists of candidates.
  • 12 February: Proclaimed lists are published in the Official State Gazette.
  • 22 February: Official start of electoral campaigning.
  • 28 February: Deadline to apply for postal voting.
  • 4 March: Official start of legal ban on electoral opinion polling publication, dissemination or reproduction and deadline for citizens entered in the Register of Absent Electors Residing Abroad to vote by mail.
  • 5 March: Deadline for postal and temporarily absent voters to issue their votes.
  • 7 March: Last day of official electoral campaigning and deadline for citizens entered in the Register of Absent Electors Residing Abroad to vote in a ballot box in the relevant Consular Office or Division.
  • 8 March: Official 24-hour ban on political campaigning prior to the general election (reflection day).
  • 9 March: Polling day (polling stations open at 9 am and close at 8 pm or once voters present in a queue at/outside the polling station at 8 pm have casted their vote). Counting of votes starts immediately.
  • 12 March: General counting of votes, including the counting of votes coming from abroad.
  • 15 March: Deadline for the general counting of votes to be carried out by the relevant Electoral Commission.
  • 24 March: Deadline for elected members to be proclaimed by the relevant Electoral Commission.
  • 3 April: Deadline for both chambers of the Cortes Generales to be re-assembled (the election Decree determines this date, which for the 2008 election was set for 1 April).[10]
  • 3 May: Maximum deadline for definitive results to be published in the Official State Gazette.

Parties and alliancesEdit

Below is a list of the main parties and electoral alliances which contested the election:

Party or alliance Candidate Ideology Refs
  José Luis
Rodríguez Zapatero
Social democracy [14]
[15]
People's Party (PP)
  Mariano Rajoy Conservatism
Christian democracy
[16]
[17]
Convergence and Union (CiU)
  Josep Antoni
Duran i Lleida
Catalan nationalism
Centrism
[18]
Republican Left of Catalonia (esquerra)   Joan Ridao Catalan independence
Social democracy
[19]
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV)   Josu Erkoreka Basque nationalism
Christian democracy
Conservative liberalism
  Gaspar Llamazares Socialism
Communism
[20]
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CC–PNC)
  Ana Oramas Regionalism
Canarian nationalism
Centrism
[21]
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG)   Francisco Jorquera Galician nationalism
Left-wing nationalism
Aragonese Union (CHA)   Bizén Fuster Aragonese nationalism
Eco-socialism
Basque Solidarity (EA)   Nekane Altzelai Basque nationalism
Social democracy
Navarre Yes (NaBai)
  Uxue Barkos Basque nationalism
Progressivism
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD)   Rosa Díez Social liberalism
Radical centrism

In the Canary Islands, an alliance was formed between New Canaries (NC) and Nationalist Canarian Centre (CCN), two splinter groups from Canarian Coalition.[22] In the Valencian Community, Valencian People's Initiative (IdPV)—splinter from United Left of the Valencian Country (EUPV)—joined a coalition with the Valencian Nationalist Bloc (Bloc) and The Greens–Ecologist Left of the Valencian Country (EVEE).[23] Unity for the Isles, an electoral alliance based in the Balearic Islands, was formed by PSM–Nationalist Agreement (PSM–EN), Majorcan Union (UM), Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC), Agreement for Majorca (ExM) and The Greens of Menorca (EV–Me).[24]

Campaign periodEdit

Party slogansEdit

Party or alliance Original slogan English translation Refs
PSOE « Motivos para creer »[k] "Reasons to believe" [25][26]
PP « Con cabeza y corazón » "With head and heart" [26][27]
CiU « El teu vot farà respectar Catalunya » "Your vote will make Catalonia to be respected" [26][28][29]
esquerra « Objectiu: un país de primera » "Goal: A first class country" [26][30][31]
EAJ/PNV « Euskadin bizi naiz ni, zu, non bizi zara? »
« Yo vivo en Euskadi, tú ¿dónde vives? »
"I live in the Basque Country, where do you live?" [32][33]
IU « LlamazarES + izquierda » "LlamazarES (is) more left" [26][34]
CC–PNC « Habla canario, ponte en tu sitio » "Speak, Canarian, claim your place" [35]
BNG « Contigo, Galiza decide » "With you, Galicia decides" [36]
CHA « Aragón con más fuerza » "Aragon, with more strength" [37]
EA « Herriaren ahotsa »
« La voz del pueblo »
"The voice of the people" [33]
NaBai « Moogi, moogi. Mugi gaitezen, mugi dezagun »
« Movámonos, movámoslo »
"Let's move us, let's move it" [38]
UPyD « Lo que nos une » "What unites us" [26][39]

Although the official electoral campaign period in Spain only lasts for the 15 days before the election, (with the exception of the day just before the election), many parties, especially the PP and PSOE, start their "pre-campaigns" months in advance, often before having finalised their electoral lists.

PSOE

The first phase campaign was done under the slogan "Con Z de Zapatero" (With Z of Zapatero), a joke based on the Prime Minister and socialist candidate's habit of tending to pronounce words ending with D as if they ended with Z. The campaign was linked to terms like equality (Igualdad-Igualdaz) or solidarity (Solidaridad-Solidaridaz), emphasizing the policies carried out by the current government. The second phase was done under the slogan "La Mirada Positiva" (The Positive outlook), emphasising the future government platform, and "Vota con todas tus fuerzas" (Vote with all of your strength), aiming to mobilize the indecisive or potentially abstaining voters. Another common slogan through all the campaign was "Motivos para creer" (Reasons to believe in).

PP

For the pre-campaign the PP used the slogan "Con Rajoy es Posible" (With Rajoy it's Possible). Usually emphasizing PP's campaign proposals, such as "Llegar a fin de mes, Con Rajoy es Posible" (Making ends meet, With Rajoy it's Possible). IU accused PP of copying its slogan from the last municipal elections[40]

IU

IU chose the pre-campaign slogan "LlamazarES + Más Izquierda" (LlamazarES (is) More Left), calling attention to their position as the third national party.

Campaign issuesEdit

The economy became a major campaign issue due to a number of factors:

  • A slowing down in the housing market, with prices even beginning to fall in some areas.
  • Sharp increases in prices of some basic commodities.
  • Global instability as a result of market uncertainty.
  • A rise in unemployment.

The sudden emergence of the economy as a political issue came after several years of steady economic growth, and led some observers to suggest that maybe the government would have benefitted from calling an earlier election.[41] In addition to those factors both the PP and the PSOE made competing proposals on taxation.

Leaders' debatesEdit

2008 Spanish general election debates
Date Organisers Moderator(s)     P  Present    S  Surrogate    NI  Non-invitee 
PSOE PP IU CiU ERC PNV CC Share Refs
21 February Antena 3[l] Matías Prats P
Solbes
P
Pizarro
NI NI NI NI NI 24.4%
(4,784,000)
[42]
[43]
25 February TV Academy Manuel Campo Vidal P
Zapatero
P
Rajoy
NI NI NI NI NI 59.1%
(13,043,000)
[44]
[45]
28 February TVE Ana Blanco S
Jáuregui
S
G. Pons
S
Muñoz
S
Jané
P
Ridao
P
Erkoreka
S
Bañuelos
11.1%
(1,759,000)
[46]
3 March TV Academy Olga Viza P
Zapatero
P
Rajoy
NI NI NI NI NI 56.3%
(11,952,000)
[44]
[47]
5 March TVE
(59 segundos)
Ana Pastor S
Jáuregui
S
G. Pons
S
Nieto
S
Xuclà
S
Cerdà
P
Erkoreka
P
Oramas
10.4%
(1,774,000)
[48]
Opinion polls
Candidate viewed as "performing best" or "most convincing" in each debate
Debate Polling firm/Commissioner PSOE PP Tie None  ?
21 February TNS Demoscopia/Antena 3[42] 47.4 37.0 15.6
25 February Sigma Dos/El Mundo[49][50] 45.5 42.0 12.5
Metroscopia/El País[51] 46.0 42.0 12.0
Opina/Cuatro[52] 45.4 33.4 8.2 13.0
Invymark/laSexta[52] 45.7 30.1 24.1
TNS Demoscopia/Antena 3[53] 45.4 39.3 15.3
3 March Sigma Dos/El Mundo[54] 49.0 40.2 10.8
Metroscopia/El País[55] 53.0 38.0 9.0
Opina/Cuatro[56] 50.8 29.0 13.4 6.8
Invymark/laSexta[57] 49.2 29.8 21.0
CIS[58] 53.3 21.5 6.9 15.8 2.5

Opinion pollsEdit

 
10-point average trend line of poll results from 12 March 2000 to 14 March 2004, with each line corresponding to a political party.
  PSOE
  PP
  IU
  CiU
  ERC
  PNV
  UPyD


ResultsEdit

Congress of DeputiesEdit

Summary of the 9 March 2008 Congress of Deputies election results
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Total +/−
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 11,289,335 43.87 +1.28 169 +5
People's Party (PP) 10,278,010 39.94 +2.23 154 +6
United Left (IU) 969,946 3.77 –1.19 2 –3
Convergence and Union (CiU) 779,425 3.03 –0.20 10 ±0
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 306,128 1.19 –0.44 6 –1
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 306,079 1.19 New 1 +1
Republican Left of Catalonia (esquerra) 298,139 1.16 –1.36 3 –5
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 212,543 0.83 +0.02 2 ±0
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CCPNC)1 174,629 0.68 –0.25 2 –1
Andalusian Coalition (CA)2 68,679 0.27 –0.52 0 ±0
Navarre Yes (NaBai) 62,398 0.24 ±0.00 1 ±0
Basque Solidarity (EA) 50,371 0.20 –0.11 0 –1
The Greens (LV) 49,355 0.19 +0.05 0 ±0
The Greens (LV) 41,531 0.16 New 0 ±0
The Greens (EV–LV)3 7,824 0.03 –0.11 0 ±0
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C's) 46,313 0.18 New 0 ±0
Anti-Bullfighting Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 44,795 0.17 New 0 ±0
Aragonese Party (PAR) 40,054 0.16 +0.02 0 ±0
Aragonese Union (CHA) 38,202 0.15 –0.21 0 –1
New CanariesCanarian Centre (NC–CCN) 38,024 0.15 New 0 ±0
The Greens–Green Group (LV–GV) 30,840 0.12 +0.07 0 ±0
Aralar (Aralar) 29,989 0.12 –0.03 0 ±0
BlocInitiativeGreens (Bloc–IdPV–EVEE) 29,760 0.12 –0.04 0 ±0
Unity for the Isles (UIB)4 25,454 0.10 –0.10 0 ±0
For a Fairer World (PUM+J) 23,318 0.09 New 0 ±0
The Greens of Europe (LVdE)5 20,419 0.08 ±0.00 0 ±0
Social Democratic Party (PSD) 20,126 0.08 New 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 20,030 0.08 +0.03 0 ±0
Citizens for Blank Votes (CenB) 14,193 0.06 –0.10 0 ±0
Spanish Phalanx of the CNSO (FE–JONS) 14,023 0.05 ±0.00 0 ±0
National Democracy (DN) 12,836 0.05 –0.01 0 ±0
The Greens–The Ecologist Alternative (EV–AE) 12,561 0.05 –0.07 0 ±0
Family and Life Party (PFyV) 9,882 0.04 –0.02 0 ±0
Humanist Party (PH) 9,056 0.04 –0.04 0 ±0
Party of Almería (PdeAL) 8,451 0.03 New 0 ±0
Navarrese Cannabis Representation (RCN/NOK) 7,769 0.03 –0.04 0 ±0
Internationalist Socialist Workers' Party (POSI) 7,386 0.03 ±0.00 0 ±0
Spanish Alternative (AES) 7,300 0.03 New 0 ±0
Spain 2000 (E–2000) 6,906 0.03 +0.01 0 ±0
Catalan Republican Party (RC) 6,746 0.03 New 0 ±0
Valencian Coalition (CVa) 5,424 0.02 New 0 ±0
Unsubmissive Seats–Alternative of Discontented Democrats (Ei–ADD) 5,035 0.02 +0.01 0 ±0
Commoners' Land (TC) 4,796 0.02 –0.01 0 ±0
Authentic Phalanx (FA) 4,607 0.02 ±0.00 0 ±0
Leonese People's Union (UPL) 4,509 0.02 –0.03 0 ±0
Internationalist Solidarity and Self-Management (SAIn) 3,885 0.02 New 0 ±0
Engine and Sports Alternative (AMD) 3,829 0.01 New 0 ±0
Pensioners in Action Party (PDLPEA) 3,050 0.01 New 0 ±0
Riojan Party (PR) 2,837 0.01 New 0 ±0
National Alliance (AN) 2,737 0.01 +0.01 0 ±0
Alternative in Blank (ABLA) 2,460 0.01 New 0 ±0
United Extremadura (EU) 2,346 0.01 –0.01 0 ±0
The Greens–Green Alternative (EV–AV) 2,028 0.01 ±0.00 0 ±0
Carlist Party (PC) 1,956 0.01 ±0.00 0 ±0
Party for Catalonia (PxCat) 1,919 0.01 New 0 ±0
Non-Smokers' Party (PNF) 1,616 0.01 New 0 ±0
Union for Leganés (ULEG) 1,566 0.01 New 0 ±0
Spanish Front (Frente) 1,539 0.01 +0.01 0 ±0
Liberal Democratic Centre (CDL) 1,503 0.01 New 0 ±0
Valencian Nationalist Option (ONV) 1,490 0.01 New 0 ±0
Democratic and Social Centre (CDS) 1,362 0.01 –0.12 0 ±0
Andecha Astur (Andecha Astur) 1,299 0.01 ±0.00 0 ±0
Regionalist Party of the Leonese Country (PREPAL) 1,278 0.00 –0.01 0 ±0
Spanish Democratic Centre (CDEs) 1,047 0.00 New 0 ±0
Canarian Nationalist Alternative (ANC) 1,017 0.00 New 0 ±0
Civil Liberties Party (PLCI) 888 0.00 New 0 ±0
Unity (Unidá) 848 0.00 New 0 ±0
Liberal Party of State Employment and Housing (PLEVE) 786 0.00 New 0 ±0
Internationalist Struggle (LI (LIT–CI)) 722 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
Unity of the People (UP) 699 0.00 New 0 ±0
For the Valencian Republic (plRV) 645 0.00 New 0 ±0
Centrist Party (PCTR) 509 0.00 New 0 ±0
Movement for the Unity of the Canarian People (MUPC) 497 0.00 New 0 ±0
Aragon United Citizens Party (pCUA) 475 0.00 New 0 ±0
Citizen Union–Independent Progressives of Canaries (UC–PIC) 464 0.00 New 0 ±0
Kingdom of Valencia Identity (IRV) 449 0.00 –0.01 0 ±0
Regionalist Unity of Castile and León (URCL) 423 0.00 New 0 ±0
State of Spain Unionist Party (PUEDE) 414 0.00 New 0 ±0
People of El Bierzo (PB–UB) 385 0.00 New 0 ±0
Islander Party of the Balearic Islands (PIIB) 360 0.00 New 0 ±0
Christian Positivist Party (PPCr) 300 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
Carlist Traditionalist Communion (CTC) 218 0.00 New 0 ±0
Asturian Democratic Convergence (CDAS) 216 0.00 New 0 ±0
Merindades of Castile Initiative (IMC) 202 0.00 New 0 ±0
Castilian Unity (UdCa) 198 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
European Ibero-American Alliance Party (PAIE) 174 0.00 New 0 ±0
Workers for Democracy Coalition (TD) 159 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
Regionalist Party of Guadalajara (PRGU) 152 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
Balearic Alliance (ABA) 145 0.00 New 0 ±0
Electronic Voting Assembly (AVE) 144 0.00 New 0 ±0
Liberal Centrist Union (UCL) 124 0.00 ±0.00 0 ±0
Alliance for Burgos (AxB) 123 0.00 New 0 ±0
Burgalese Citizen Initiative (ICBur) 109 0.00 New 0 ±0
We Are (N Som) 105 0.00 New 0 ±0
Independents for Cuenca (ixC) 100 0.00 New 0 ±0
Citizen Group (AGRUCI) 79 0.00 New 0 ±0
Falangist Movement of Spain (MFE) 68 0.00 New 0 ±0
Aitch Party (PHache) 0 0.00 New 0 ±0
Blank ballots 286,182 1.11 –0.47
Total 25,734,863 350 ±0
Valid votes 25,734,863 99.36 +0.37
Invalid votes 165,576 0.64 –0.37
Votes cast / turnout 25,900,439 73.85 –1.81
Abstentions 9,172,740 26.15 +1.81
Registered voters 35,073,179
Sources[59][60]
Popular vote
PSOE
43.87%
PP
39.94%
IU
3.77%
CiU
3.03%
EAJ/PNV
1.19%
UPyD
1.19%
esquerra
1.16%
BNG
0.83%
CC–PNC
0.68%
NaBai
0.24%
Others
3.00%
Blank ballots
1.11%
Seats
PSOE
48.29%
PP
44.00%
CiU
2.86%
EAJ/PNV
1.71%
esquerra
0.86%
IU
0.57%
BNG
0.57%
CC–PNC
0.57%
UPyD
0.29%
NaBai
0.29%

SenateEdit

Summary of the 9 March 2008 Senate of Spain election results
Parties and coalitions Directly
elected
Reg.
app.
Total
Seats +/−
People's Party (PP) 101 –1 23 124
People's Party (PP)1 98 ±0 23 121
Navarrese People's Union (UPN) 3 ±0 0 3
Valencian Union (UV) 0 –1 0 0
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 88 +7 19 107
Catalan Agreement of Progress (PSCERCICVEUiA) 12 ±0 4 16
Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC) 8 ±0 2 10
Republican Left of Catalonia (esquerra) 3 ±0 1 4
Initiative for Catalonia Greens–EUiA (ICV–EUiA) 1 ±0 1 2
Convergence and Union (CiU) 4 ±0 3 7
Democratic Convergence of Catalonia (CDC) 4 ±0 2 6
Democratic Union of Catalonia (UDC) 0 ±0 1 1
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 2 –4 2 4
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CCaPNC) 1 –2 1 2
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CCaPNC)2 0 –2 1 1
Independent Herrenian Group (AHI) 1 ±0 0 1
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 0 ±0 1 1
Aragonese Party (PAR) 0 ±0 1 1
Socialist Party of Majorca (PSM) 0 ±0 1 1
Independents 0 ±0 1 1
Total 208 ±0 56 264
Sources[12][61][62][60]
Seats
PP
46.97%
PSOE
40.53%
PSC–ERC–ICV
6.06%
CiU
2.65%
EAJ/PNV
1.52%
CC–PNC
0.76%
BNG
0.38%
PAR
0.38%
PSM
0.38%
Independents
0.38%

AftermathEdit

Investiture
José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (PSOE)
Ballot → 9 April 2008 11 April 2008
Required majority → 176 out of 350  N Simple  Y
168 / 350
169 / 350
158 / 350
158 / 350
23 / 350
23 / 350
1 / 350
0 / 350
Sources[63]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ 142 PSOE, 20 PSC, 1 LV, 1 EV–OV.
  2. ^ 145 PP, 2 UPN.
  3. ^ 6 CDC, 4 UDC.
  4. ^ 2 IU, 2 ICV, 1 IdPV.
  5. ^ 2 CC, 2 BNG, 1 CHA, 1 EA, 1 NaBai, 1 NC, 1 independent (ex-PP).
  6. ^ 118 PP, 4 UPN, 1 IF.
  7. ^ 10 PSC, 4 ERC, 1 ICV, 1 EUiA.
  8. ^ 5 CDC, 1 UDC.
  9. ^ 3 CC, 1 AHI.
  10. ^ 1 BNG, 1 PAR, 1 PSM, 1 independent.
  11. ^ Under this generic slogan, the party launched another thirteen interchangeable expressions:
    • Spanish: Por todo lo que merece la pena (English: "For all what matters")
    • Spanish: Comprometidos con la Igualdad (English: "Committed to Equality")
    • Spanish: Vivimos juntos, decidimos juntos (English: "We live together, we decide together")
    • Spanish: No es lo mismo (English: "Is not the same")
    • Spanish: Porque lo estamos consiguiendo (English: "Because we are getting it done")
    • Spanish: Somos más (English: "We are more")
    • Spanish: Soñar con los pies en la tierra (English: "Head in the clouds, feet on the ground")
    • Spanish: Por todo lo logrado (English: "For everything achieved")
    • Spanish: Por el pleno empleo (English: "For full employment")
    • Spanish: Porque no está todo hecho (English: "Because everything is not done")
    • Spanish: La octava potencia económica, la primera en derechos sociales (English: "Eight economic power, first in social rights")
    • Spanish: Ahora que avanzamos, por qué retroceder (English: "Now that we move forward, why going back?")
    • Spanish: Podemos llegar tan lejos como queramos (English: "We can reach as far as we want")
  12. ^ Debate centered on economic issues.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit