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National Democracy (Spanish: Democracia Nacional, DN) is a far-right[2] political party in Spain, founded in 1995. It is modelled on the Front National (FN) of France, and grew indirectly out of several defunct parties like the Spanish Circle of Friends of Europe (CEDADE) group and Juntas Españolas. Its leader is Manuel Canduela Serrano, a former member of Acción Radical, a group active in the Valencian Community. He was also a vocalist in the so-called "identity" rock group Division 250.[3]

National Democracy

Democracia Nacional
LeaderManuel Canduela Serrano
Founded1995
HeadquartersPeña Francia Street, 13, Valladolid
Youth wingDemocracia Nacional Joven
IdeologySpanish nationalism
Right-wing populism
Neo-Nazism[1]
Hard euroscepticism
Anti-globalism
Political positionFar-right
European affiliationAlliance for Peace and Freedom
Party flag
New Democracy flag.png
Website
democracianacional.org

In the 2004 general election, the party got 15,180 votes throughout Spain, amounting to 0.06% of the total vote. In the 2008 general election, it got 12,588 votes, amounting to 0.05% of the vote. That dropped to 0.01% of the vote in the 2011 general election, with 1,876 votes.

In 2007 the party gained three town councillors: two in Tardajos and one in Herradón de Pinares. In Tardajos it governed with the People's Party. In the 2011 local elections one town councillor was elected under the DN banner in Tardajos. In the 2015 local elections DN lost the seat in Tardajos but gained a new town councillor at Cuenca de Campos, that they lost in 2019.[4]

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
National Democracy rally, 2014.
 
Manuel Canduela, leader of the party, in 2011

The party was formed in January 1995 by members of the far-right groups, CEDADE and the Juntas Españolas. CEDADE had been a neo-Nazi group led by prominent fascist figure and Nazi collaborator, Léon Degrelle. The Juntas Españolas had been a far-right party that attempted to copy the image and strategy of the French National Front.[5]

The party's first president was Juan Enrique Peligro Robledo. Later Manuel Canduela, a founding member of the neo-Nazi musical group Division 250, became president in 2004. He had previously directed the party's youth wing, the Democracia Nacional Joven.

In July 2013 ND joined forces with La Falange, Alianza Nacional, Nudo Patriota Español and the Spanish Catholic Movement in the La España en Marcha initiative; that year on Catalonia's national day members of these parties staged altercations at the Blanquerna Cultural Center of Catalonia to protest Catalan independence.[6]

The party was a founding member of the far-right European political party, the Alliance for Peace and Freedom, founded in 2015 with other members including Forza Nuova and the National Democratic Party of Germany.

In 2019, National Democracy formed an electoral coalition, ADÑ Identidad Española, with FE-JONS, Spanish Alternative and La Falange to contend in the 2019 European Parliament election in Spain.[7]

IdeologyEdit

The party has been described by Spanish political observers as far-right,[8] adopting many of the features of the Nouvelle Droite movement.[9] The party espouses anti-immigration rhetoric and xenophobia directed towards non-Spanish citizens. In territorial politics they defend the unity of Spain being staunchly nationalist and opposed to Catalan independence.[10] The party is eurosceptic, it supports the dissolution of the union.

Elections resultsEdit

Congress of Deputies and SenateEdit

Election Congress of Deputies Senate Rank Government Leader
Votes % ±pp Seats won +/− Seats won +/−
2000 9,562 0.04%  
0 / 470
±0 N/A N/A #33 No seats Manuel Canduela Serrano
2004 15,180 0.06%  
0 / 470
±0 N/A N/A #27 No seats Manuel Canduela Serrano
2008 12,836 0.05%  0.01
0 / 472
 0 N/A N/A #29 No seats Manuel Canduela Serrano
2011 1,867 0.01%  0.4
0 / 473
 0 N/A N/A #38 No seats Manuel Canduela Serrano
2015 1,704 0.01% -
0 / 350
 0
0 / 207
 0 #35 No seats Manuel Canduela Serrano

European ParliamentEdit

Election year # of total votes % of overall vote Rank # of seats won
1999[11][12] 8,053   0.04%   31  
0 / 12
2004[13][14] 6,314   0.04%   17  
0 / 12
2009[15][16] 9,950   0.06%   20  
0 / 12
2014[17][18] 13,079   0.08%   27  
0 / 12
2019[19] Within ADÑ - Spanish Identity.
0 / 54

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Büttner, Frauke (2011). "Right-wing extremism in Spain: Between parliamentary right-wing extremism in Spain: Between parliamentary insignificance, far-right populism and racist violence". Is Europe on the "right" path: Right-wing extremism and right-wing populism in Europe (pdf). (coordinado por Nora Langenbacher y Britta Schellenberg). p. 185. ISBN 978-3-86872-617-6.
  2. ^ Romero, Juanma Los 10.000 hijos de la ultraderecha 18 November 2007 Público, 54 http://www.publico.es/estaticos/pdf/18112007.pdf[permanent dead link]
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ Local election results - 2019. El País.
  5. ^ http://hemeroteca.abc.es/nav/Navigate.exe/hemeroteca/madrid/abc/1984/10/02/021.html
  6. ^ https://www.elconfidencial.com/espana/2013-09-14/los-ultras-de-blanquerna-al-habla-con-amanecer-dorado-para-copiar-su-exito_28414/
  7. ^ https://elpais.com/ccaa/2018/10/12/catalunya/1539343349_600889.html
  8. ^ http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/do/08338.pdf
  9. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=0fTqAAAAIAAJ
  10. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=-fGaaj5ZJEgC
  11. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. European Parliament. June 1999. National totals". infoelectoral.mir.es (in Spanish). Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  12. ^ "European election 13 June 1999". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Electoral History. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  13. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. European Parliament. June 2004. National totals". infoelectoral.mir.es (in Spanish). Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  14. ^ "European election 13 June 2004". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Electoral History. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  15. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. European Parliament. June 2009. National totals". infoelectoral.mir.es (in Spanish). Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  16. ^ "European election 7 June 2009". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Electoral History. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  17. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. European Parliament. May 2014. National totals". infoelectoral.mir.es (in Spanish). Ministry of the Interior. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  18. ^ "European election 25 May 2014". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Electoral History. Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  19. ^ Resultados Elecciones Europeas 2019 de España - RTVE.es (in Spanish), retrieved 2019-08-05

External linksEdit