List of Star Wars films

The Star Wars franchise has spawned multiple live-action and animated films. The franchise started with a film trilogy set in medias res—beginning in the middle of the story—which was later expanded to a trilogy of trilogies, better known as the "Skywalker saga". The original trilogy was released between 1977 and 1983, the prequel trilogy between 1999 and 2005, and a sequel trilogy between 2015 and 2019. The original eponymous film, later subtitled Episode IV – A New Hope, was followed by the sequels Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (1983), forming what is collectively referred to as the original trilogy.

Star Wars films
SW opening crawl logo.svg
Official logo
Produced by
Based onCharacters created
by George Lucas
Production
company
Distributed by
Release date
1977–present
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
BudgetTotal (12 films):
$1.633 billion
Box officeTotal (12 films):
$10.316 billion

Years later, a prequel trilogy was released, consisting of Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002), and Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005). A sequel trilogy began with Episode VII – The Force Awakens (2015), continued with Episode VIII – The Last Jedi (2017), and concluded with Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker (2019).[1] In between the sequel films, two anthology films were released, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) and Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018), both set between the prequel and original trilogies. The combined box office revenue of the films equates to over US$10 billion,[2] and it is currently the second-highest-grossing film franchise.[3] All the major theatrical live-action films were nominated for Academy Awards. The original film was nominated for most of the major categories, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Supporting Actor for Alec Guinness, while all sequels have been nominated for technical categories.

The first spin-off film produced was the Star Wars Holiday Special (1978). In 1984 and 1985, two live-action films featuring the Ewoks were televised in the United States and released theatrically in Europe. Several Star Wars television series have also been released.

Skywalker sagaEdit

The Star Wars film series, which developed into a trilogy of trilogies and which has been rebranded as the "Skywalker saga",[a][4][1] was released beginning with the original trilogy (Episodes IV, V and VI, 1977–1983), followed by the prequel trilogy (Episodes I, II and III, 1999–2005) and the sequel trilogy (Episodes VII, VIII and IX, 2015–2019).[b] The three trilogies each focus on the Force-sensitive Skywalker family. The prequels focus on Anakin Skywalker and his training as a Jedi and eventual fall to the dark side as Darth Vader. The original trilogy follows his children, Luke and Leia, as they join the Rebel Alliance and battle Vader and the Galactic Empire. The sequel trilogy features Kylo Ren (Ben Solo), a major antagonist and eventual Supreme Leader of the First Order, and son of Leia, nephew of Luke, and grandson of Anakin.

Each episodic film begins with an opening crawl, accompanied by the main Star Wars theme by John Williams, who composes the scores for each film. The first six films have had retroactive changes made after their initial theatrical releases, most notably the original trilogy.

Film U.S. release date Director Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s)
Original trilogy
Episode IV – A New Hope May 25, 1977 (1977-05-25) George Lucas Gary Kurtz
Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back May 21, 1980 (1980-05-21) Irvin Kershner Leigh Brackett & Lawrence Kasdan George Lucas
Episode VI – Return of the Jedi May 25, 1983 (1983-05-25) Richard Marquand Lawrence Kasdan & George Lucas Howard Kazanjian
Prequel trilogy
Episode I – The Phantom Menace May 19, 1999 (1999-05-19) George Lucas Rick McCallum
Episode II – Attack of the Clones May 16, 2002 (2002-05-16) George Lucas George Lucas & Jonathan Hales George Lucas
Episode III – Revenge of the Sith May 19, 2005 (2005-05-19) George Lucas
Sequel trilogy
Episode VII – The Force Awakens December 18, 2015 (2015-12-18) J. J. Abrams J. J. Abrams & Lawrence Kasdan
and Michael Arndt
Kathleen Kennedy, J. J. Abrams and Bryan Burk
Episode VIII – The Last Jedi December 15, 2017 (2017-12-15) Rian Johnson Kathleen Kennedy and Ram Bergman
Episode IX – The Rise of Skywalker December 20, 2019 (2019-12-20) J. J. Abrams Chris Terrio & J. J. Abrams Derek Connolly & Colin Trevorrow
and Chris Terrio & J. J. Abrams
Kathleen Kennedy, J. J. Abrams and Michelle Rejwan

Standalone filmsEdit

As Lucas was outlining a trilogy of trilogies, he also imagined making additional movies unrelated to the Skywalker saga.[5] The first theatrical films set outside the main episodic series were the Ewok spin-off films Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984)[6] and Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985), which were screened internationally after being produced for television.

After the conclusion of his then six-episode saga in 2005, Lucas returned to spin-offs in the form of television series. An animated film, The Clone Wars (2008), was released as a pilot to a TV series of the same name. An anthology series set between the main episodes entered development in parallel to the production of the sequel trilogy,[7] described by Disney CFO Jay Rasulo as origin stories.[8] The first entry, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016), tells the story of the rebels who steal the Death Star plans directly before Episode IV.[9][10] Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) focuses on Han's backstory, also featuring Chewbacca and Lando Calrissian.

Animated filmEdit

Film Release date Director Screenwriter(s) Producer(s)
Star Wars: The Clone Wars August 15, 2008 (2008-08-15) Dave Filoni Henry Gilroy, Steven Melching and Scott Murphy Catherine Winder

The Clone Wars (2008)Edit

Preceding the airing of the animated TV series in late 2008, the theatrical feature Star Wars: The Clone Wars was compiled from episodes "almost [as] an afterthought."[11][12] It reveals that Anakin trained an apprentice between Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith; the series explains Padawan Ahsoka Tano's absence from the latter film. The character was originally criticized by fans, but by the end of the series the character had become a fan favorite.[13][14] The film and series exist in the same level of canon as the episodic and anthology films.[15]

Anthology filmsEdit

Film U.S. release date Director(s) Screenwriter(s) Story by Producer(s)
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story December 16, 2016 (2016-12-16) Gareth Edwards Chris Weitz & Tony Gilroy John Knoll & Gary Whitta Kathleen Kennedy, Allison Shearmur and Simon Emanuel
Solo: A Star Wars Story May 25, 2018 (2018-05-25) Ron Howard Jonathan Kasdan & Lawrence Kasdan

Before selling Lucasfilm to Disney in 2012, and parallel to his development of a sequel trilogy, George Lucas and original trilogy co-screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan started development on a standalone film about a young Han Solo.[7] In February 2013, Disney CEO Bob Iger made public the development of a Kasdan film[16] and Entertainment Weekly reported that it would focus on Han Solo.[17] Disney CFO Jay Rasulo has described the standalone films as origin stories.[8] Kathleen Kennedy confirmed that there was "no attempt being made to carry characters (from the standalone films) in and out of the saga episodes."[18] The standalone films are subtitled "A Star Wars Story".[9][19]

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)Edit

Felicity Jones, the lead of Rogue One, and John Knoll, who supervised the visual effects of the prequels and pitched the plot of Rogue One.

Rogue One is set directly before Episode IV: A New Hope and focuses on the eponymous group of rebels who obtain the plans to the Death Star.[20] Its laser was developed by scientist Galen Erso (played by Mads Mikkelsen) after the Empire forcibly abducted him, separating him from his daughter Jyn. Galen secretly sends a defecting Imperial pilot, Bodhi Rook, to deliver a message warning of the weapon's existence and revealing its weakness to his rebel friend Saw Gerrera. Under the false promise of her father's liberation, Jyn agrees to help Rebel Alliance intelligence officer Cassian Andor and his droid K-2SO retrieve the message from Saw, now the paranoid leader of an extremist cell of rebels.

The idea for the movie came from John Knoll, the chief creative officer of Industrial Light & Magic.[21] In May 2014, Lucasfilm announced Gareth Edwards as the director of an anthology film, with Gary Whitta writing the first draft for a release on December 16, 2016.[22] The film's title was revealed to be Rogue One, with Chris Weitz rewriting the script, and Felicity Jones in the starring role.[23] Ben Mendelsohn and Diego Luna also play new characters,[24] with James Earl Jones returning to voice Darth Vader.[25] Edwards stated, "It comes down to a group of individuals who don't have magical powers that have to somehow bring hope to the galaxy."[26] The film was the first to feature characters introduced in animated Star Wars TV series, namely The Clone Wars' Saw Gerrera, portrayed by Forest Whitaker in the film. The movie received generally positive reviews, with its performances, action sequences, soundtrack, visual effects and darker tone being praised. The film grossed over US$500 million worldwide within a week of its release.[27]

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)Edit

Lawrence Kasdan, who co-wrote Episodes VVII and Solo, and Alden Ehrenreich, who plays young Han Solo.

Solo, the second anthology film, focuses on Han Solo about 10 years before A New Hope.[20] After an escape attempt from his Imperial-occupied home planet of Corellia goes wrong, a young Han vows to return to rescue his girlfriend Qi'ra. Han "Solo" joins the Imperial Academy; however, he is expelled for his reckless behavior. Han and his newfound Wookiee friend Chewbacca resort to a criminal life, mentored by veteran smuggler Beckett. After angering gangster Dryden Vos, Han and his company's lives depend on pulling a heist for him. Without a ship to travel, they hire Lando Calrissian, the captain and owner of the Millennium Falcon.

Before selling Lucasfilm to Disney, George Lucas had hired Star Wars original trilogy veteran Lawrence Kasdan to write a film about a young Han Solo.[7] The film stars Alden Ehrenreich as a young Han Solo, Joonas Suotamo as Chewbacca (after serving as a double for the character in The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi), Donald Glover as Lando Calrissian, Emilia Clarke as Qi'ra, and Woody Harrelson as Beckett. Lucasfilm originally hired Phil Lord and Christopher Miller to direct, but they were fired during principal photography, and replaced by Ron Howard. A twist ending acknowledges one of the major story arcs of The Clone Wars and Rebels animated series, while leaving the story open ended for sequels.[28]

Future filmsEdit

Rian Johnson, the writer/director of The Last Jedi, is confirmed to write and direct the first film of a new trilogy he is currently outlining[29][30] and will start working on after completing his 2019 film Knives Out and possibly another film.[31][32] The trilogy will differ from the Skywalker-focused films in favor of focusing on new characters and possibly a different era in the main film franchise.[33]

In mid-2018, Lucasfilm confirmed that multiple anthology films were in development,[34] with their release following a hiatus after 2019's The Rise of Skywalker.[35]

On September 25, 2019, it was announced that Marvel Cinematic Universe producer Kevin Feige was developing a Star Wars film with Kathleen Kennedy.[36]

On February 21, 2020, Variety reported that a Star Wars film from Sleight director J. D. Dillard and Luke Cage writer Matt Owens was in the early stages of development.[37]

On May 4, 2020, it was announced that Taika Waititi (who directed the season finale of The Mandalorian), will direct a Star Wars film from a screenplay he is co-writing with Krysty Wilson-Cairns.[38]

Three unspecified films are scheduled for mid-December 2023, 2025, and 2027. These release dates were pushed back a year because of the COVID-19 pandemic.[39]

Produced for televisionEdit

The first spin-off film (also the first sequel to be released) was a holiday TV special aired in 1978. Two live-action TV films created in the mid-1980s feature the Ewoks; these both had limited international theatrical runs.

Star Wars Holiday Special (1978)Edit

Film Release date Director Screenwriter(s) Network
Star Wars Holiday Special November 17, 1978 Steve Binder Pat Proft, Leonard Ripps, Bruce Vilanch, Rod Warren and Mitzie Welch CBS

Produced for CBS in 1978, the Star Wars Holiday Special was a two-hour television special, in the format of a variety show. Stars of the original film and archive footage from the original Star Wars film appeared alongside celebrity guest stars in plot-related skits, musical numbers, and an animated segment, all loosely tied together by the premise of Chewbacca's family waiting for his arrival for the "Life Day" celebration on his home planet, Kashyyyk. George Lucas loathed the special and forbade it to be re-aired or released on home video, with the sole exception of the 11-minute animated sequence that featured the first appearance of bounty hunter Boba Fett, which was eventually included as a bonus feature in some of the films' Blu-ray releases.[40]

Ewok filmsEdit

The Ewoks from Return of the Jedi were featured in two spin-off television films, The Ewok Adventure and Ewoks: The Battle for Endor. Both aired on ABC on the Thanksgiving weekends of 1984 and 1985, respectively.[41] Warwick Davis reprised his debut role as the main Ewok, Wicket, in both.[42][43] They are set between the events of The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi.[44] Both films were released on VHS, Laser Disc, and on a double-feature DVD. Although based on story ideas from Lucas, they do not bear Star Wars in their titles, and were considered to exist in a lower level of canon than the episodic films. Following Disney's acquisition of the franchise, they were excluded from the canon.[45][6] The Battle for Endor would be the last live-action Star Wars television project produced by Lucasfilm until 2019's The Mandalorian.

Film Release date Director(s) Screenwriter(s) Story by Network
The Ewok Adventure[c] November 25, 1984 John Korty Bob Carrau George Lucas ABC
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor November 24, 1985 Jim Wheat and Ken Wheat

The Ewok Adventure (1984)Edit

In a story by Lucas and a screenplay by Bob Carrau, the Towani family spaceship shipwrecks on the forest moon of Endor. While trying to repair their ship, the castaway family is split, when a giant creature known as the Gorax kidnaps the parents. Taking pity on the kids, a group of native Ewoks led by Wicket decides to help little Cindel Towani and her older brother Mace, rescue their parents.[42][43] Among other stylistic choices making the film unique from the Star Wars episodes is the inclusion of a narrator.[46]

Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985)Edit

The sequel focuses on the Ewoks protecting their village from marauders led by the evil Lord Terak, who killed all the members of the Towani family except for Cindel, in search of a power battery.[42]

Technical informationEdit

Films of the Star Wars series were mostly filmed with an aspect ratio of 2.39:1 in mind. The original and sequel trilogies were filmed with anamorphic lenses. Episodes IV, V, VII, and VIII were filmed in Panavision, while Episode VI was filmed in Joe Dunton Camera (JDC) scope. Episode I was filmed with Hawk anamorphic lenses on Arriflex cameras, and Episodes II and III were filmed with Sony CineAlta high-definition digital cameras.[47] Episode VII and VIII had select footage filmed with 65mm IMAX film cameras, with one scene in Episode VII presented in an aspect ratio of either 1.43:1 or 1.90:1 in most IMAX theaters. Rogue One and Solo were filmed with ARRI Alexa 65 cameras with the former using the Ultra Panavision 70 format.

Music and sound effectsEdit

 
John Williams, composer of the scores for the film trilogies

Lucas hired Ben Burtt to oversee the sound effects on the original 1977 film. Burtt's accomplishment was such that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented him with a Special Achievement Award because it had no award at the time for the work he had done.[48] Lucasfilm developed the THX sound reproduction standard for Return of the Jedi.[49] John Williams composed the scores for all nine films. Lucas's design for Star Wars involved a grand musical sound, with leitmotifs for different characters and important concepts. Williams's Star Wars title theme has become one of the most famous and well-known musical compositions in modern music history.[50]

StuntsEdit

Lucas hired 'the Dean of Special Effects' John Stears, who created R2-D2, Luke Skywalker's Landspeeder, the Jedi Knights' lightsabers, and the Death Star.[51][52] The technical lightsaber choreography for the original trilogy was developed by leading filmmaking sword-master Bob Anderson. Anderson trained actor Mark Hamill (Luke Skywalker) and performed all the sword stunts as Darth Vader during the lightsaber duels in The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, wearing Vader's costume.[citation needed] Anderson's role in the original Star Wars trilogy was highlighted in the film Reclaiming the Blade, where he shares his experiences as the fight choreographer developing the lightsaber techniques for the movies.[53]

ReceptionEdit

Box office performanceEdit

The Star Wars films are the second-highest-grossing film franchise of all time worldwide, behind the Marvel Cinematic Universe, having grossed over $10 billion at the global box office.[54]

Film U.S. release date Box office gross All-time ranking Budget Ref(s)
U.S. and Canada Other territories Worldwide U.S. and Canada Worldwide
Skywalker saga
Star Wars May 25, 1977 $460,998,507 $314,613,557 $775,512,064 19 98 $11 million [55]
The Empire Strikes Back May 21, 1980 $290,371,960 $257,607,494 $547,975,067 98 182 $18 million [56]
Return of the Jedi May 25, 1983 $309,306,177 $166,040,934 $475,306,177 82 231 $32.5 million [57]
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace May 19, 1999 $474,544,677 $552,538,030 $1,027,044,677 18 42 $115 million [58]
Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones May 16, 2002 $310,676,740 $338,859,618 $649,436,358 80 140 $115 million [59]
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith May 19, 2005 $380,270,577 $469,765,058 $850,035,635 44 78 $113 million [60]
Star Wars: The Force Awakens December 18, 2015 $936,662,225 $1,132,561,399 $2,068,223,624 1 4 $245 million [61]
Star Wars: The Last Jedi December 15, 2017 $620,181,382 $713,358,507 $1,333,539,889 9 12 $317 million [62]
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker December 20, 2019 $515,202,542 $558,941,706 $1,074,144,248 14 32 $275 million [63]
Spin-off films
Star Wars: The Clone Wars August 15, 2008 $35,161,554 $33,121,290 $68,282,844 2,447 2,211 $8.5 million [64]
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story December 16, 2016 $532,177,324 $524,879,949 $1,056,057,273 12 36 $265 million [65]
Solo: A Star Wars Story May 25, 2018 $213,767,512 $179,157,295 $392,924,807 189 311 $300 million [66][67]
Total $5,081,223,784 $5,239,306,792 $10,318,030,576 2 2 $1.633 billion [68][54]

Critical responseEdit

Film Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic CinemaScore [69]
Skywalker saga
Star Wars 92% (129 reviews)[70] 90 (24 reviews)[71] N/A
The Empire Strikes Back 94% (102 reviews)[72] 82 (25 reviews)[73] N/A
Return of the Jedi 82% (94 reviews)[74] 58 (24 reviews)[75] N/A
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 53% (230 reviews)[76] 51 (36 reviews)[77] A−
Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones 65% (253 reviews)[78] 54 (39 reviews)[79] A−
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 80% (299 reviews)[80] 68 (40 reviews)[81] A−
Star Wars: The Force Awakens 93% (434 reviews)[82] 80 (55 reviews)[83] A
Star Wars: The Last Jedi 90% (471 reviews)[84] 85 (56 reviews)[85] A
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker 51% (494 reviews)[86] 54 (60 reviews)[87] B+
Spin-off films
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 18% (170 reviews)[88] 35 (30 reviews)[89] B−[69]
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story 84% (446 reviews)[90] 65 (51 reviews)[91] A[69]
Solo: A Star Wars Story 70% (471 reviews)[92] 62 (54 reviews)[93] A−[69]
Television films
Star Wars Holiday Special 29% (14 reviews)[94] N/A N/A
The Ewok Adventure 23% (13 reviews)[95] N/A N/A
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor 50% (2 reviews)[96] N/A N/A

AccoladesEdit

Academy AwardsEdit

The eleven live-action films together have been nominated for 37 Academy Awards, of which they have won seven. The films were also awarded a total of three Special Achievement Awards. The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi received Special Achievement Awards for their visual effects,[97][98] and Star Wars received a Special Achievement Award for its alien, creature and robot voices.[99][100]

Film Best Picture Best Director Best Supporting Actor Best Original Screenplay Best Costume Design Best Film Editing Best Makeup Best Original Score Best Production Design Best Sound Editing Best Sound Mixing Best Visual Effects Ref.
A New Hope Nominated Nominated[i] Nominated Won category not yet introduced Won   Won Won [99]
The Empire Strikes Back             Nominated   Special Achievement [97]
Return of the Jedi               Nominated [98]
The Phantom Menace                   Nominated [101]
Attack of the Clones                       [102]
Revenge of the Sith             Nominated           [103]
The Force Awakens           Nominated   Nominated   Nominated Nominated [104]
Rogue One                     [105]
The Last Jedi               Nominated   Nominated [106]
Solo                       Nominated [107]
The Rise of Skywalker               Nominated   Nominated   Nominated

Grammy AwardsEdit

The franchise has received a total of fourteen Grammy Award nominations, winning six.[108]

Film Album of the Year Best Pop Instrumental Performance Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media Best Instrumental Composition Ref.
Star Wars Nominated Won Won Won[ii] [109]
The Empire Strikes Back   Nominated[iii] Won Won[iv] [109]
Return of the Jedi     Nominated   [109]
The Phantom Menace     Nominated   [109]
Revenge of the Sith     Nominated Nominated[v] [109]
The Force Awakens     Won   [109]
Notes
  1. ^ Alec Guinness for his performance as Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  2. ^ For "Star Wars – Main Title"
  3. ^ For "Yoda's Theme"
  4. ^ For The Empire Strikes Back. Also nominated for "The Imperial March (Darth Vader's Theme) and "Yoda's Theme".
  5. ^ For "Anakin's Betrayal"

Library of CongressEdit

In 1989, the Library of Congress selected the original Star Wars film for preservation in the U.S. National Film Registry, as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."[110] The Empire Strikes Back was selected in 2010.[111][112] 35mm reels of the 1997 Special Editions were the versions initially presented for preservation because of the difficulty of transferring from the original prints,[113][114] but it was later revealed that the Library possessed a copyright deposit print of the original theatrical releases. By 2015, Star Wars had been transferred to a 2K scan which can be viewed by appointment.[115]

Emmy AwardsEdit

Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure was one of four films to be juried-awarded Emmys for Outstanding Special Visual Effects at the 37th Primetime Emmy Awards.[116] The film was additionally nominated for Outstanding Children's Program but lost in this category to an episode of American Playhouse.[117]

At the 38th Primetime Emmy Awards, Ewoks: The Battle for Endor and the CBS documentary Dinosaur! were both juried-awarded Emmys for Outstanding Special Visual Effects.[118] The film additionally received two nominations for Outstanding Children's Program and Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Special.[119][120]

Unproduced and rumored filmsEdit

In early 2013, Bob Iger announced the development of a spin-off film written by Simon Kinberg,[121] reported by Entertainment Weekly to focus on bounty hunter Boba Fett during the original trilogy.[122] In mid-2014, Josh Trank was officially announced as the director of an undisclosed spin-off film,[123] but had left the project a year later due to creative differences,[124] causing a teaser for the film to be scrapped from Star Wars Celebration.[125] In May 2018, it was reported that James Mangold had signed on to write and direct a Fett film, with Kinberg attached as producer and co-writer.[126][127] By October, the Fett film[d] was reportedly no longer in production, with the studio instead focusing on The Mandalorian, which utilizes a similar character design.[129]

In August 2017, it was rumored that films focused on Jabba the Hutt, and Jedi Masters Obi-Wan and Yoda were being considered or were in development.[130]Stephen Daldry was reportedly in early negotiations to co-write and direct the Obi-Wan movie.[131] At D23 Expo in August 2019, it was announced that a streaming series about the character would be produced instead.[132]

Felicity Jones, who played Jyn Erso in Rogue One, has the option of another Star Wars film in her contract; notwithstanding her character's fate in Rogue One, it has been speculated that she could return in other anthology films.[133] In 2018, critics noted that Solo was intentionally left open for sequels.[134][135] Alden Ehrenreich and Emilia Clarke confirmed that their contracts to play Han Solo and Q'ira extended for additional films, if required.[136][137] Kathleen Kennedy expressed being open to making a spin-off about the younger Lando Calrissian as seen in Solo, but confirmed that none was currently in development.[138]

An unannounced film centered around the Mos Eisley Spaceport was reportedly put on hold or cancelled in mid-2018,[139][140] leading to rumors of the cancellation or postponement of the anthology series.[140] Lucasfilm swiftly denied the rumors as "inaccurate", confirming that multiple unannounced films were in development.[34]

Game of Thrones creators David Benioff and D. B. Weiss were to write and produce a trilogy of Star Wars films scheduled to be released in December 2023, 2025, and 2027,[141] which were first announced to be in development in February 2018.[142] However, citing their commitment to a Netflix deal, the duo stepped away from the project in October 2019. Kennedy stated her openness to their returning when their schedules allow.[143][141]

Additionally, though unconfirmed by Lucasfilm, BuzzFeed reported in May 2019 that Laeta Kalogridis was writing the script for the first film in a potential Knights of the Old Republic trilogy.[144] In January 2020, a film set in the era of The High Republic was rumored to be in development.[145]

See alsoEdit

ParodiesEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ By Lucasfilm, while promoting The Rise of Skywalker in 2018.
  2. ^ The first two trilogies were released on three year intervals, the sequel trilogy films two years apart.
  3. ^ Retitled Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure for its theatrical and later releases
  4. ^ Reported to have also featured the other bounty hunters from The Empire Strikes Back[128]

ReferencesEdit

Citations

  1. ^ a b "Star Wars: Episode IX Cast Announced". StarWars.com. July 27, 2018. Archived from the original on June 26, 2019. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  2. ^ "Star Wars – Box Office History". The Numbers. Archived from the original on July 6, 2013. Retrieved June 17, 2010.
  3. ^ "Movie Franchises". The Numbers. Archived from the original on July 6, 2013. Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  4. ^ LEADBEATER, ALEX (January 24, 2017). "A Brief History of Star Wars Titles". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on February 6, 2019. ... how the Star Wars saga is currently evolving ... Lucasfilm fluctuated between Star Wars Anthology and A Star Wars Story, before settling on the latter. ... Episode VIII becoming The Last Jedi continues this trend, ... the announcement calls it "the next chapter in the Skywalker saga," solidifying "Skywalker Saga" as the official banner for the numbered episodes.
  5. ^ Steranko, Jim "George Lucas", Prevue #42, September–October 1980.
  6. ^ a b Newbold, Mark (April 15, 2013). "Star Wars in the UK: The Dark Times, 1987—1991". StarWars.com. Archived from the original on March 11, 2017. Retrieved March 16, 2017.
  7. ^ a b c McCreesh, Louise (February 13, 2018). "Lucas had been developing a Han Solo movie for ages". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on March 14, 2018. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  8. ^ a b Graser, Marc (September 12, 2013). "Star Wars: The 'Sky's the Limit' for Disney's Spinoff Opportunities". Variety. Retrieved September 13, 2013.
  9. ^ a b Breznican, Anthony (April 19, 2015). "Star Wars: Rogue One and mystery standalone movie take center stage". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 20, 2015. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  10. ^ Breznican, Anthony (November 22, 2016). "As Rogue One looms, Lucasfilm develops secret plans for new Star Wars movies". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  11. ^ Joshua Rich (March 17, 2008). "George Lucas on 'Star Wars,' Indiana Jones". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on August 19, 2014. Retrieved September 24, 2018.
  12. ^ Douglas Brode; Leah Deyneka (2012). Myth, Media, and Culture in Star Wars: An Anthology. Scarecrow Press. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-8108-8512-7.
  13. ^ "How Ahsoka Tano Completed the Arc of Anakin Skywalker". www.themarysue.com. Archived from the original on October 5, 2018. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  14. ^ "Dave Filoni Just Made an Unexpected 'Star Wars' Revelation". Archived from the original on June 21, 2018. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  15. ^ "The Legendary Star Wars Expanded Universe Turns a New Page". StarWars.com. April 25, 2014. Archived from the original on September 10, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  16. ^ "Disney Earnings Beat; 'Star Wars' Spinoffs Planned". CNBC. February 5, 2013. Archived from the original on February 6, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  17. ^ Breznican, Anthony (February 6, 2013). "'Star Wars' spin-offs: A young Han Solo movie, and a Boba Fett film – Exclusive". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 8, 2013. Retrieved February 6, 2013.
  18. ^ Gallagher, Brian. "Star Wars Spin-Offs Will Not Crossover with the New Trilogy". MovieWeb. Archived from the original on January 19, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2014.
  19. ^ Breznican, Anthony (November 22, 2016). "As Rogue One looms, Lucasfilm develops secret plans for new Star Wars movies". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  20. ^ a b Armitage, Hugh (January 13, 2019). "'Star Wars' timeline – the complete chronology from Phantom Menace to The Last Jedi". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on February 17, 2019. Retrieved March 17, 2019.
  21. ^ "ROGUE ONE - A STAR WARS STORY: John Knoll - Overall VFX Supervisor & Chief Creative Officer - Industrial Light & Magic - The Art of VFXThe Art of VFX". www.artofvfx.com. January 9, 2017. Archived from the original on September 16, 2018. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  22. ^ Kit, Borys (May 22, 2014). "'Star Wars' Spinoff Hires 'Godzilla' Director Gareth Edwards (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 25, 2014. Retrieved May 22, 2014.
  23. ^ Collura, Scott (March 12, 2015). "ROGUE ONE WILL BE FIRST STAR WARS STAND-ALONE FILM". IGN. Archived from the original on March 13, 2015. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  24. ^ Fleming, Mike, Jr (March 3, 2015). "Ben Mendelsohn Orbiting 'Star Wars' Spin Off 'Rogue One'?". Deadline Hollywood.
  25. ^ Oleksinski, Johnny (December 9, 2016). "What we know about the new characters in 'Rogue One'". New York Post. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
  26. ^ Bishop, Bryan (April 19, 2015). "Star Wars: Rogue One will be about the Rebel Alliance stealing plans for the Death Star". The Verge. Archived from the original on April 19, 2015. Retrieved April 19, 2015.
  27. ^ "Rogue One (2016)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 27, 2016.
  28. ^ Silliman, Brian (May 25, 2018). "Solo's biggest surprise and the Star Wars: The Clone Wars connection". SyFy Wire. Archived from the original on September 12, 2018. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  29. ^ "Rian Johnson, Writer-Director of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, to Create All-New Star Wars Trilogy". StarWars.com. November 9, 2017. Archived from the original on November 16, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  30. ^ Chitwood, Adam (February 14, 2019). "Yes, Rian Johnson Is Still Working on His 'Star Wars' Trilogy". Collider. Archived from the original on February 14, 2019. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  31. ^ "Star Wars: Rian Johnson Teases when He Starts Work on His New Trilogy". April 5, 2019. Archived from the original on April 6, 2019. Retrieved April 6, 2019.
  32. ^ Chichizola, Corey (September 17, 2019). "Rian Johnson Explains The Timing Of His Star Wars Trilogy". CinemaBlend. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  33. ^ Breznican, Anthony (April 13, 2019). "Lucasfilm putting the 'Star Wars' movies 'on hiatus' after this year". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 14, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  34. ^ a b "'Multiple films' still in 'Star Wars' pipeline, sources say". Good Morning America. ABC. June 21, 2018. Archived from the original on August 30, 2018. Retrieved April 3, 2020.
  35. ^ Patches, Matt (April 12, 2019). "Star Wars movies to go on 'hiatus' after Episode IX". Polygon. Retrieved April 3, 2020.
  36. ^ Kim Masters (September 25, 2019). "'Star Wars' Shocker: Marvel's Kevin Feige Developing New Movie for Disney (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on September 26, 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  37. ^ Vary, Adam B. (February 21, 2020). "New 'Star Wars' Movie in Development With 'Sleight' Director, 'Luke Cage' Writer". Variety. Retrieved February 21, 2020.
  38. ^ "Taika Waititi to Direct, Co-Write new Star Wars Film". StarWars.com. May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  39. ^ Chitwood, Adam (July 23, 2020). "Disney Delays a Trio of Upcoming 'Star Wars' Movies by a Year Each". Collider. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  40. ^ Warren, Robert (December 25, 2014). "The Star Wars holiday special George Lucas wants to smash every copy of with a sledgehammer". Salon. Archived from the original on January 8, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  41. ^ Corry, John (November 24, 1985). "New Shows For Children: Should We Expect More?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 2, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  42. ^ a b c Alter, Ethan (December 15, 2015). "Star Wars: How the Ewoks Came to TV 31 Years Ago". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on February 10, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  43. ^ a b O'Connor, John (November 23, 1984). "TV Weekend; The Ewok Adventure, Sunday Movie on ABC". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved March 1, 2017.
  44. ^ Chee, Leland (Tasty Taste) (June 14, 2006). "Star Wars: Message Boards: Books, Comics, & Television VIPs". StarWars.com. Archived from the original on March 5, 2007. Retrieved November 2, 2018.
  45. ^ Bibbiani, William (December 14, 2017). "Are the Ewok Movies As Bad As You Remember?".
  46. ^ "The best Star Wars movie is The Ewok Adventure". theweek.com. December 13, 2017. Archived from the original on November 9, 2018. Retrieved November 9, 2018.
  47. ^ "Widescreen-O-Rama". The Digital Bits. Archived from the original on March 24, 2008. Retrieved March 27, 2008.
  48. ^ Sergi, Gianluca (March 1998). "Tales of the Silent Blast: Star Wars and Sound". Journal of Popular Film & Television. 26 (1): 12–22. doi:10.1080/01956059809602769.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  49. ^ "Quality Home Theater Systems Products". Digital Home Theater. Archived from the original on March 21, 2008. Retrieved March 27, 2008.
  50. ^ "Star Wars Trilogy". Amazon. Archived from the original on March 4, 2008. Retrieved March 27, 2008.
  51. ^ "John Stears, 64, Dies; Film-Effects Wizard" Archived July 1, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. New York Times. Retrieved January 28, 2013
  52. ^ "John Stears; Special Effects Genius Behind 007 and R2-D2", Los Angeles Times, archived from the original on October 18, 2012, retrieved January 28, 2013
  53. ^ Reclaiming the Blade, IMDb, 2009, archived from the original on August 12, 2018, retrieved July 20, 2018
  54. ^ a b "Star Wars Movies at the Box Office". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 8, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  55. ^ "Star Wars (1977)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 12, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2020.
  56. ^ "The Empire Strikes Back (1980)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 7, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  57. ^ "Return of the Jedi (1983)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 18, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  58. ^ "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (1999)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved February 13, 2020.
  59. ^ "Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones (2002)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on February 15, 2009. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  60. ^ "Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith (2005)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on January 25, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2020.
  61. ^ "Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on February 27, 2016. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  62. ^ "Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on December 19, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  63. ^ "Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on December 30, 2019. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  64. ^ "Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008)". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 5, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  65. ^ FilmL.A. (May 23, 2017). "2016 Feature Film Study" (PDF). FilmL.A. Feature Film Study: 22. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 31, 2017. Retrieved November 22, 2018.
  66. ^ Christian Sylt (June 4, 2018). "Disney Recoups A Quarter Of $4 Billion Star Wars Purchase Price". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  67. ^ Anthony D'Alessandro (October 26, 2018). "'Star Wars' Boba Fett Movie No Longer In Development; Lucasfilm Focusing On 'The Mandalorian' Streaming Series". Deadline. Archived from the original on October 26, 2018. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  68. ^ "Franchise Index". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on May 24, 2014. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  69. ^ a b c d "Star Wars at Cinemascore". CinemaScore. Archived from the original on July 24, 2019. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  70. ^ "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 6, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  71. ^ "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope". Metacritic. Archived from the original on December 27, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  72. ^ "Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on June 20, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  73. ^ "Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back". Metacritic. Archived from the original on November 6, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  74. ^ "Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 7, 2019. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  75. ^ "Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi". Metacritic. Archived from the original on February 21, 2013. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  76. ^ "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (1999)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  77. ^ "Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace". Metacritic. Archived from the original on December 30, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  78. ^ "Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones (2002)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  79. ^ "Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones". Metacritic. Archived from the original on March 27, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  80. ^ "Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith (2005)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved March 2, 2020.
  81. ^ "Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith". Metacritic. Archived from the original on December 27, 2012. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  82. ^ "Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens (2015)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  83. ^ "Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens". Metacritic. Archived from the original on September 17, 2016. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  84. ^ "Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  85. ^ "Star Wars: Episode VIII - The Last Jedi". Metacritic. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  86. ^ "Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  87. ^ "Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker Reviews". Metacritic. Archived from the original on December 18, 2019. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  88. ^ "Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on August 8, 2011. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  89. ^ "Star Wars: The Clone Wars". Metacritic. Archived from the original on December 15, 2015. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  90. ^ "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 25, 2019. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  91. ^ "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story". Metacritic. Archived from the original on July 23, 2017. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  92. ^ "Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 20, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  93. ^ "Solo: A Star Wars Story". Metacritic. Archived from the original on May 19, 2018. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  94. ^ "Star Wars: Holiday Special (1978)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 23, 2019. Retrieved January 23, 2020.
  95. ^ "The Ewok Adventure (1984)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 7, 2019. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  96. ^ "Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on May 5, 2019. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
  97. ^ a b "The 53rd Academy Awards (1981) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  98. ^ a b "The 56th Academy Awards (1984) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  99. ^ a b "The 50th Academy Awards (1978) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  100. ^ "To Benjamin Burtt, Jr. for the creation of the alien, creature and robot voices featured in "Star Wars."". Academy Awards Acceptance Speech. Archived from the original on December 23, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  101. ^ "The 72nd Academy Awards (2000) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  102. ^ "The 75th Academy Awards (2003) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  103. ^ "The 78th Academy Awards (2006) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  104. ^ "The 88th Academy Awards (2016) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  105. ^ "The 89th Academy Awards (2017) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  106. ^ "The 90th Academy Awards (2018) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on March 10, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  107. ^ "The 91st Academy Awards (2019) Nominees and Winners". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Archived from the original on April 5, 2019. Retrieved April 5, 2019.
  108. ^ "The music of 'Star Wars': A GRAMMY history". The Recording Academy. May 15, 2017. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  109. ^ a b c d e f "John Williams". The Recording Academy. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017. Retrieved December 22, 2017.
  110. ^ "U.S. National Film Registry Titles". U.S. National Film Registry. Archived from the original on August 21, 2006. Retrieved September 2, 2006.
  111. ^ "'Empire Strikes Back' among 25 film registry picks". Archived from the original on December 31, 2010. Retrieved December 28, 2010.
  112. ^ Barnes, Mike (December 28, 2010). "'Empire Strikes Back,' 'Airplane!' Among 25 Movies Named to National Film Registry". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on December 30, 2010. Retrieved December 28, 2010.
  113. ^ Andrews, Mallory (July 21, 2014). "A 'New' New Hope: Film Preservation and the Problem with 'Star Wars'". soundonsight.org. Sound on Sight. Archived from the original on July 28, 2014. Retrieved July 27, 2014. the NFR does not possess workable copies of the original versions...Government-mandated agencies such as the National Film Registry are unable to preserve (or even possess) working copies of the films on their list without the consent of the author and/or copyright holder.
  114. ^ "Request Denied: Lucas Refuses to Co-Operate with Government Film Preservation Organizations". savestarwars.com. Saving Star Wars. 2011. Archived from the original on December 3, 2014. Retrieved July 27, 2014. When the request was made for STAR WARS, Lucasfilm offered us the Special Edition version. The offer was declined as this was obviously not the version that had been selected for the Registry.
  115. ^ Ulanoff, Lance (December 17, 2015). "The search for the 'Star Wars' George Lucas doesn't want you to see". Mashable. Archived from the original on October 13, 2016. Retrieved October 12, 2016.
  116. ^ Leverence, John. "Outstanding Special Visual Effects - 1985". 37th Primetime Emmy Awards, September 22, 1985. Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on January 26, 2019. Retrieved January 13, 2016.
  117. ^ "Outstanding Children's Program - 1985". 37th Primetime Emmy Awards, September 22, 1985. Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on January 29, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  118. ^ Leverence, John. "Outstanding Special Visual Effects — 1986". 38th Primetime Emmy Awards, September 21, 1986. Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on August 1, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2016.
  119. ^ "Outstanding Children's Program — 1986". 38th Primetime Emmy Awards, September 21, 1986. Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on July 6, 2018. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  120. ^ "Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Special — 1986". 38th Primetime Emmy Awards, September 21, 1986. Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Archived from the original on June 22, 2018. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  121. ^ Disney Earnings Beat; 'Star Wars' Spinoffs Planned. CNBC. February 5, 2013. Event occurs at 7:20. Archived from the original on February 6, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2013.
  122. ^ Breznican, Anthony (February 6, 2013). "'Star Wars' spin-offs: A young Han Solo movie, and a Boba Fett film – Exclusive". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 6, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  123. ^ "Josh Trank To Direct Stand-Alone Star Wars Film". StarWars.com. June 4, 2014. Archived from the original on June 28, 2014. Retrieved August 23, 2018.
  124. ^ Oldham, Stuart (May 1, 2015). "Star Wars: Josh Trank No Longer Directing Spinoff". Variety. Archived from the original on August 24, 2018. Retrieved August 23, 2018.
  125. ^ Breznican, Anthony (November 22, 2016). "Star Wars: Secret plans for new movies discussed after Rogue One". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on November 6, 2018. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  126. ^ Kit, Borys (May 24, 2018). "'Star Wars': Boba Fett Movie in the Works With James Mangold (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 25, 2018. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  127. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (May 24, 2018). "Star Wars Boba Fett Spinoff Said To Be Back On Track With James Mangold". Deadline. Archived from the original on May 25, 2018. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  128. ^ Breznican, Anthony (October 13, 2018). "Star Wars producers halt unannounced Boba Fett standalone film". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on October 30, 2018. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
  129. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (October 26, 2018). "'Star Wars' Boba Fett Movie No Longer In Development; Lucasfilm Focusing On 'The Mandalorian' Streaming Series". Deadline. Archived from the original on October 26, 2018. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  130. ^ Kroll, Justin (August 17, 2017). "'Star Wars' Obi-Wan Kenobi Movie in Early Development at Disney". Variety. Archived from the original on November 20, 2018. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  131. ^ Kit, Borys (August 17, 2017). "Star Wars Obi-Wan Kenobi Film in the Works (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 25, 2018. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  132. ^ "The Galaxy Far, Far Away Just Got A Little Bigger…". StarWars.com. August 23, 2019. Archived from the original on August 24, 2019. Retrieved August 24, 2019.
  133. ^ Bradley, Laura (December 16, 2016). "So, Felicity Jones Could Be in Another Star Wars Movie". HWD. Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  134. ^ Polo, Susana (May 25, 2018). "The ending of Solo: A Star Wars Story sets up for more". Polygon. Archived from the original on December 17, 2019. Retrieved October 15, 2019.
  135. ^ Britt, Ryan. "'Solo: A Star Wars Story' Sequels Seem Really Likely, According to Critics". Inverse.com. Archived from the original on November 16, 2018. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  136. ^ Miller, Matt (April 24, 2018). "Alden Ehrenreich Will Return as Han Solo After 'Solo'". Esquire. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  137. ^ Houghton, Rianne (May 17, 2018). "Could Solo: A Star Wars Story be getting a sequel? Emilia Clarke says she signed up for multiple Star Wars films". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on September 26, 2018. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  138. ^ King, Rachel (May 16, 2018). "Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy's Comments on the Next Star Wars Spin-Offs Spark Confusion". Fortune. Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved November 25, 2018.
  139. ^ "Rumor: Mos Eisley Spaceport film postponed, Obi-Wan and Fett live?". Making Star Wars. June 21, 2018. Archived from the original on June 21, 2018. Retrieved June 22, 2018.
  140. ^ a b Weintraub, Steve (June 20, 2018). "Star Wars Spinoffs on Hold at Lucasfilm". Collider. Archived from the original on August 31, 2018. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  141. ^ a b Holmes, Adam (October 30, 2019). "What The Game Of Thrones Showrunners' Star Wars Trilogy Was Reportedly About". Cinema Blend. Archived from the original on October 31, 2019. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  142. ^ "Game of Thrones Creators David Benioff & D.B. Weiss To Write And Produce A New Series Of Star Wars Films". StarWars.com. February 6, 2018. Archived from the original on February 6, 2018. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  143. ^ Geoff Boucher (October 28, 2019). "Star Wars Setback: Game Of Thrones Duo David Benioff & D.B. Weiss Exit Trilogy". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 29, 2019. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  144. ^ Aurthur, Kate (May 23, 2019). "A New "Star Wars" Movie Based On "Knights Of The Old Republic" Is In The Works". BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on May 24, 2019. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  145. ^ Kain, Erik (January 8, 2020). "The Next 'Star Wars' Movie Is Reportedly Set In The 'High Republic' Era — Here's What That Means". Forbes. Retrieved February 27, 2020.

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit