Krysty Wilson-Cairns

Krysty Wilson-Cairns (born May 1987) is a Scottish screenwriter. Born and raised in Glasgow, Scotland, she attended Craigholme School, and later studied at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, and the National Film and Television School. During her teenage years, she was a runner on television series including the detective show Taggart. Her script for the unproduced science fiction thriller Aether made the 2014 Black List and led to a staff writer role on the television show Penny Dreadful. Her feature film debut was the screenplay for the Sam Mendes-directed 2019 war film 1917. She co-wrote it with Mendes and received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay.

Krysty Wilson-Cairns
BornMay 1987 (age 32)
Glasgow, Scotland
OccupationScreenwriter
NationalityScottish
EducationCraigholme School
Alma materRoyal Conservatoire of Scotland
National Film and Television School
Years active2012–present

Early lifeEdit

Wilson-Cairns was born in May 1987[1] in Glasgow, Scotland.[2] She grew up in the Shawlands area of the city in a single-parent household. Wilson-Cairns was privately educated at the Craigholme School. Her grandparents partly funded her place at the school.[2] At the age of 15, she had a work experience placement on the Scottish detective show Taggart.[3] The series had used the mechanic shop that her father worked in as a set and she reports that she used to watch the filming of it during her summer holidays.[2][4] She became a runner on the show as well as on other television series including; Rebus, and Lip Service.[5][6]

Wilson-Cairns had initially aspired to study physics and become an engineer but her on set experiences as a runner fostered her interest in working in the film industry.[4] She studied Digital Film and Television at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (RCS), and graduated in 2009.[7] Her first creative work at the RCS was a short story about killer guinea pigs.[2][8] She credits her ambition to become a screenwriter on being inspired by one of her lecturers at the RCS, screenwriter Richard Smith.[9] She then spent a year working at the BBC Comedy Unit, before moving to London where she gained an MA in Screenwriting from the National Film and Television School (NFTS) in 2013.[7][10] While studying at the NFTS, she worked as a bartender in The Toucan, an Irish pub in Soho. During her downtime, she developed script ideas.[11][12]

CareerEdit

Wilson-Cairns sold her first film script to FilmNation Entertainment in 2014.[13] It was for the science fiction thriller project Aether which provided her breakthrough after it made the top ten of the Black List, an anonymous annual survey of the 'most liked' unproduced screenplays.[14][15][16] The script was read by screenwriter John Logan who hired her to work as a staff writer on his television show Penny Dreadful in 2015.[7] She also contributed to its comic book series.[17] Her first writing commission was for a potential film adaptation, to be directed by Tobias Lindholm, of Charles Graeber's non-fiction book The Good Nurse: A True Story of Medicine, Madness, and Murder.[18][19] Filmmaker Sam Mendes was impressed by her treatment, and suggested collaborating on a future film project.[20] They had previously met while working on Penny Dreadful, a show he had been an executive producer on. They worked on two potential projects together.[21] This included a film adaptation of Gay Talese's book The Voyeur′s Motel. However both projects fell through due to licensing issues.[22][23] In 2017, she was named as one of Forbes 30 under 30 in the Hollywood and Entertainment category.[24]

Wilson-Cairns co-wrote the screenplay for Mendes' World War I film 1917 (2019). It was her feature film debut.[21] The film follows two young British soldiers on a mission to warn a fellow battalion of a German ambush, and is shot to appear as if it is one continuous take.[25] To help develop the script, she travelled to the battlefields and cemeteries of World War I in northern France with her mother and read frontline diaries at the Imperial War Museum.[2][26] For her work on the film, Wilson-Cairns received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay.[27][28] She shared the BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film.[29] She was named as one of the 10 Screenwriters to Watch by the trade magazine Variety in their 2019 list.[30]

Her next project is Edgar Wright's psychological horror Last Night in Soho (2020). She co-wrote the screenplay with Wright, and will have a cameo as a bartender.[23] Wilson-Cairns has also been hired to adapt journalist Evan Ratliff's book The Mastermind: Drugs. Empire. Murder. Betrayal. about programmer-turned-drug cartel boss Paul Le Roux, for an Amazon Studios crime drama series.[31][32]

FilmographyEdit

Feature filmsEdit

Year Title Notes Ref(s)
2019 1917 BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay
[27][28][29]
2020  Last Night in Soho Post-production [33]
Key
  Denotes films that have not yet been released

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Notes Ref(s)
2016 Penny Dreadful Season 3 staff writer [7][15]

Short filmsEdit

Year Title Notes Ref(s)
2012 All Men's Dead Short film [34][35]
2012 The End of an Era Short film [34][36]
2013 Dollface Short film [37]
2013 Musical Star Short film [38]
2013 Fink Short film [34][39]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "We Write At Dawn Limited". Companies House. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e Smith, Mark (5 January 2020). "1917: Krysty Wilson-Cairns – 'A young woman writing a war movie? I thought I'd never get the chance'". The Herald (Glasgow). Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Krysty Wilson-Cairns on Glasgow". i-on. 27 June 2017. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  4. ^ a b Parker, Charlie; Sweeney, Chris (21 December 2019). "1917 writer honed her talent in the trenches of Taggart". The Sunday Times. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.(subscription required)
  5. ^ "How I Became A Screenwriter". BBC The Social (YouTube). 3 September 2017. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  6. ^ "'1917' Screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns joins Giles Alderson, Dom Lenoir & Robbie McKane". The Filmmakers Podcast (Podcast). 7 January 2020. Event occurs at 37:47. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d Dougan, Andy. "Screen Queen". Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  8. ^ "'1917' Screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns joins Giles Alderson, Dom Lenoir & Robbie McKane". The Filmmakers Podcast (Podcast). 7 January 2020. Event occurs at 34:45. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  9. ^ "'1917' Screenwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns joins Giles Alderson, Dom Lenoir & Robbie McKane". The Filmmakers Podcast (Podcast). 7 January 2020. Event occurs at 34:30. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  10. ^ Harkness, Alistair (6 January 2020). "Glasgow's Krysty Wilson-Cairns on co-writing Golden Globe winner 1917: 'I've been writing for five years and this is my first movie that has been made'". The Scotsman. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  11. ^ Johnson, G. Allen (24 December 2019). "After a decade of Bond, Sam Mendes gets personal with World War I epic '1917'". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  12. ^ Synnot, Siobhan (5 January 2020). "Who said war movies are a man's world?". The Sunday Times. Archived from the original on 9 January 2020. Retrieved 14 January 2020.(subscription required)
  13. ^ Fleming Jr., Mike (13 March 2014). "FilmNation Scores Sci-Fi Thriller Spec 'Aether'". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 28 March 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  14. ^ Bloom, David; Yamato, Jen (15 December 2014). "'Catherine The Great' Leads The Blacklist 2014: Full List — Update". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 22 November 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  15. ^ a b Cohen, Anna (3 January 2020). "Meet The 32-Year-Old Woman Who Co-Wrote The Best War Movie Of The Year". Refinery29. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  16. ^ Halligan, Fionnuala (5 June 2014). "Krysty Wilson-Cairns, UK Stars of Tomorrow 2014". Screen International. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  17. ^ "Interview: A conversation with TV and comic scriptwriter Krysty Wilson-Cairns". Flickering Myth. 14 May 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  18. ^ Jagernauth, Kevin (11 December 2014). "Darren Aronofsky Eyes True Story Serial Killer Pic 'The Good Nurse'". IndieWire. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  19. ^ McNary, Dave (7 August 2018). "Jessica Chastain, Eddie Redmayne in Talks to Star in Thriller 'The Good Nurse'". Variety. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  20. ^ "The Script Lab Podcast: Krysty Wilson-Cairns — Co-Writer of '1917' with Director Sam Mendes". The Script Lab Podcast (Podcast). 13 January 2020. Event occurs at 05:24. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  21. ^ a b Ritman, Alex (3 January 2020). "'1917' and How to Write a One-Shot Script: "Fly Blind and Make It Up as We Go Along"". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 15 January 2020.
  22. ^ Busch, Anita (6 June 2016). "'The Voyeur's Motel' Moving Forward, Sets Scribe With Krysty Wilson-Cairns". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 1 August 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2020.
  23. ^ a b Bramesco, Charles (26 November 2019). "1917 writer Krysty Wilson-Cairns funneled WWI obsessions into the single-shot epic". Polygon. Archived from the original on 28 November 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  24. ^ "Krysty Wilson-Cairns". Forbes. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 5 January 2020.
  25. ^ Kermode, Mark (12 January 2020). "1917 review – Sam Mendes's unblinking vision of the hell of war". The Observer. Archived from the original on 12 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  26. ^ "Krysty Wilson-Cairns on writing 1917". Imperial War Museums (YouTube). 8 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  27. ^ a b Nordyke, Kimberly; Konerman, Jennifer; Strause, Jackie; Howard, Annie (13 January 2020). "Oscars: Nominations List". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  28. ^ a b Buchanan, Kyle (6 January 2020). "Writers Guild Nominations: 'Parasite,' 'Marriage Story,' 'Joker' and More". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 7 January 2020. Retrieved 7 January 2020.
  29. ^ a b Dams, Tim (2 February 2020). "'1917' Rules Over BAFTAs With Seven Wins; 'Joker' Takes Three". Variety. Retrieved 3 February 2020.
  30. ^ "Variety Announces 10 Screenwriters to Watch for 2019". Variety. 29 August 2019. Archived from the original on 5 December 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  31. ^ Petski, Denise (23 December 2019). "'Mastermind' Crime Drama Produced By Noah Hawley, Russo Brothers & Skybound In Works At Amazon". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  32. ^ Marland, Ian (4 January 2020). "Writer of 1917 turns to crime for next film". The Times.(subscription required)
  33. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (7 August 2019). "Edgar Wright Thriller 'Last Night In Soho' Gets 2020 Release Date". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on 8 August 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  34. ^ a b c "Introducing Krysty Wilson-Cairns". Edinburgh International Film Festival. 7 October 2016. Archived from the original on 1 August 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  35. ^ "All Men's Dead". David Woodman (Vimeo). Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  36. ^ "The End of an Era". Open University (YouTube). Archived from the original on 3 September 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  37. ^ "Dollface". Louis Paxton (Vimeo). Archived from the original on 9 January 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  38. ^ "Musical Star". Louis Paxton (Vimeo). Archived from the original on 9 January 2019. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  39. ^ "Fink". British Council. Archived from the original on 13 January 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.

External linksEdit