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Gregor Schlierenzauer (pronounced [ˈʃliːʁənt͡saʊ̯ɐ]; born 7 January 1990) is an Austrian ski jumper. He is one of the sport's most successful athletes of all time, having won the Ski Jumping World Cup overall title, the Four Hills Tournament, and Nordic Tournament twice each; the Ski Flying World Cup overall title three times; as well as four medals at the Winter Olympics, twelve at the Ski Jumping World Championships, and five at the Ski Flying World Championships.

Gregor Schlierenzauer
FIS Ski Jumping World Cup 2014 - Engelberg - 20141220 - Gregor Schlierenzauer 2.jpg
Schlierenzauer in Engelberg, 2014
Country Austria
Born (1990-01-07) 7 January 1990 (age 29)
Innsbruck, Austria
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Ski clubSV Innsbruck–Bergisel
Personal best243.5 m (799 ft)
Vikersund, 12 February 2011
World Cup career
Seasons2006–present
Individual wins53
Team wins17
Indiv. podiums88
Team podiums36
Indiv. starts243
Team starts48
Overall titles2 (2009, 2013)
Four Hills titles2 (2012, 2013)
Ski Flying titles3 (2009, 2011, 2013)
Nordic titles2 (2008, 2009)
Updated on 24 March 2019.

During his victorious 2008/09 World Cup season, Schlierenzauer set a number of ski jumping records, including surpassing Janne Ahonen's record of twelve individual World Cup wins with thirteen; and also tying Ahonen, Matti Hautamäki, and Thomas Morgenstern's record of six consecutive individual wins in a single season. On 26 January 2013, Schlierenzauer equalled Matti Nykänen's long-standing record of 46 individual World Cup wins, and currently has 53 to his name as of March 2018; the most of any male ski jumper.[1]

Contents

Early and personal lifeEdit

Gregor Schlierenzauer was born on 7 January 1990 in Innsbruck, Tyrol, to Paul and Angelika Schlierenzauer.[2] The second of three children, he has an older sister, Gloria, and a younger brother, Lukas. His uncle is Markus Prock, the winner of three Winter Olympic medals in men's luge, who settled him a contract with Fischer Skis in 2001 and a few years later with Red Bull. Schlierenzauer is deaf in the left ear from birth.[2] He is also the cousin of luger Hannah Prock.[3]

At age eight, Schlierenzauer began training in ski jumping at SV Innsbruck–Bergisel club. He attended an ordinary Austrian grammar school, however, due to tight schedules in both sport and school, he had problems keeping up with his class work. Schlierenzauer then enrolled at Skigymnasium Stams in Austria, the world's oldest ski-sport training center and boarding secondary school. He currently resides in Fulpmes, Tyrol.[2]

Schlierenzauer began competing professionally in the 2005/06 season in the Continental Cup, then only fifteen years old. In February 2006, he won the gold medal at the Junior World Championships in Kranj, Slovenia and then Alex Pointner, the coach of the Austrian professional team, called him to compete in the World Cup. Schlierenzauer debuted in the World Cup finishing in 24th place at the Holmenkollen Ski Festival on 12 March 2006.[4]

Ski jumping careerEdit

2006/07 World CupEdit

On 3 December 2006, Schlierenzauer took his first World Cup victory in Lillehammer, Norway, and became one of the youngest jumpers to ever win in Lillehammer. He also won in Oberstdorf, Germany, at the Four Hills Tournament 2006/07. During the Four Hills Tournament, Finnish newspapers claimed that Schlierenzauer was extremely underweight, however, no evidence has ever been found to substantiate this accusation. He won the fourth competition, in Bischofshofen, Austria, on his 17th birthday, but finished the tournament in second place, behind Anders Jacobsen (Norway), and in front of Simon Ammann (Switzerland).

Schlierenzauer took fourth place in World Cup 2006/07. He was second, but Adam Małysz from Poland ended up taking the first-place position from Anders Jacobsen, so Schlierenzauer finished third. His coach deemed the event in Planica too demanding for 17-year-old Schlierenzauer, so he did not compete there and ended finishing fourth, behind Adam Małysz, Anders Jacobsen and Simon Ammann.

2007/08 World CupEdit

At the beginning of the World Cup 2007/08, Schlierenzauer took 2nd place on the World Cup list, behind his teammate Thomas Morgenstern. He also took 2nd place in Oberstdorf,Germany, during the Four Hills Tournament 2007/08. He won 1st place in Garmisch-Partenkirchen,Germany. He took 8th place at the competition in Bischofshofen which was originally to be held in Innsbruck but was moved due to strong winds. He was one of the favorites for the tournament, but, due to variable weather conditions, arrived only in 42nd position in the first series and did not enter the second series. At the end of the Four Hills Tournament, he ended up in 12th place.

He skipped the competitions in Predazzo, where Tom Hilde from Norway took his first World Cup victory, and in Harrachov. On 25 January 2007, Schlierenzauer took his second World Cup victory in Zakopane, Poland. He also skipped the competition in Sapporo, ruining his chance to take the first-place position from his Austrian teammate Thomas Morgenstern.

After two-second-place finishes in Liberec and an eighth-place finish in Willingen, he took part in the FIS Ski Flying World Championships in Oberstdorf in 2008. After four series of competing, he won the gold medal, on 23 February 2008. The next day, on 24 February, the Austrian team, composed of (Schlierenzauer-Thomas Morgenstern-Koch-Kofler) won gold in the team competition.

He also took part in the 2008 Nordic Tournament. He took the second and fourth place at the two competitions in Kuopio and in Lahti which was moved to Kuopio because of bad weather). Winning at the competitions in Lillehammer and Oslo, he won the 2008 Nordic Tournament.

After consecutively winning the last four individual competitions of the season, Schlierenzauer ranked second overall in the 2007/08 World Cup, 233 points behind his teammate Thomas Morgenstern. In March 2008, he improved the Austrian national record on flying hills to 233.5 meters, which was also the longest jump of Planica 2008 ski jumping events.

2008/09 World CupEdit

On 11 February 2009, Schlierenzauer became only the fourth jumper to win 6 consecutive World Cup events, tying the record held by Austrian teammate Thomas Morgenstern and Finns Janne Ahonen and Matti Hautamäki. The run of victories came to an end in Oberstdorf during the ski flying event on 14 February, when Schlierenzauer arrived in 8th position.

 
Gregor Schlierenzauer (left) & Wolfgang Loitzl (right) at Zakopane 2009.

On 21 February he won silver in the individual normal hill event at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2009 in Liberec behind fellow Austrian and Four Hills winner Wolfgang Loitzl. One week later, Schlierenzauer won gold in the team large hill event.

He returned to winning ways in individual competition on 8 March at Lahti, Finland, taking his number of wins to 11 for that season, one victory shy of Janne Ahonen's record of 12 wins in one season.

On 20 March he won the ski flying event at Planica, taking his number of wins to 13 for the season record, record of 20 podiums in a season and clinching the 2008–09 world cup title with two flying events left to run. He also achieved a record of 2083 points in the World Cup over a single season, becoming the first person to obtain more than 2000 points. The current records of wins, podiums and points in a single world cup season is held by Peter Prevc.

2009/10 World CupEdit

 
Schlierenzauer won three medals at the 2010 Winter Olympics.

In the 2009/10 World Cup, Schlierenzauer finished second behind Simon Ammann. He celebrated 8 World Cup victories including wins in Garmisch-Partenkirchen and Innsbruck during the Four Hills Tournament. One of the season highlights for Schlierenzauer was the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. He was only 7th after the first round in the Normal Hill competition, but jumping 106.5 meters in the final round, moved him up to 3rd position. The Normal Hill event was won by Simon Ammann while Adam Malysz was second. A week later, Schlierenzauer was 5th after the first round in the Large Hill competition, but moved to 3rd place again in the final round. The competition was once again won by Simon Ammann while Adam Malysz finished second.

Two days later he won the Team Event with Wolfgang Loitzl, Andreas Kofler and Thomas Morgenstern, earning Schlierenzauer his first ever Olympic Gold Medal.

2010/11 World CupEdit

At the beginning of the 2010/11 World Cup, Schlierenzauer suffered an injury and missed the first two events of the Four Hills Tournament. Even though he was recovering from injury, he managed to take two victories at the Vikersund ski flying hill and, later in the season, won three gold medals at FIS Nordic World Ski Championships at Holmenkollen in Oslo. He also set a new Personal Best at a competition in Vikersund by jumping 243.5 meters.

2011/12 World CupEdit

Schlierenzauer celebrated his first victory of the 2011/12 season in Harrachov on 9 December 2011.[5] On 6 January 2012, Schlierenzauer won the 4 Hills Tournament for the first time. As of 5 February 2012, Schlierenzauer has 40 World Cup victories, 1 gold and 2 bronze Olympic medals, and 8 gold and 2 silver medals at World championships.

2012/13 World CupEdit

In the 2012–13 season, Schlierenzauer won the Individual World Cup Standings for the second time total. He also won the Four Hills Tournament for a second time, and the Ski Flying World Cup for a third time total. At the first Individual Competition in Vikersund, Gregor equaled Nykänen's record of 46 World Cup Wins, and at Harrachov he superseded Nykänen's record by winning again.

2017/18 World CupEdit

Schlierenzauer made a comeback to the World Cup at Titisee-Neustadt. His best result of the season was 13th at Oberstdorf in the Four Hills Tournament. At the season Final in Planica, Schlierenzauer jumped 253.5 meters in the Qualification but touched the ground with his hands.[6] It was the same length as Stefan Krafts world record, however it did not count as he touched the ground with his hands. Schlierenzauer finished the season 35th overall with 77 points.

2018/19 World CupEdit

Schlierenzauer dissapointed in the season opener at Wisla, but was 12th in the difficult wind conditions at Kuusamo, a week later.

Olympic GamesEdit

Event Normal Hill Large Hill Team
Representing   Austria
  2010 Vancouver Bronze Bronze Gold
  2014 Sochi 11th 7th Silver
  2018 Pyeongchang 22nd 4th

World ChampionshipsEdit

Event Normal Hill Large Hill Team Normal Hill Team Large Hill Mixed Team
Representing   Austria
  2007 Sapporo 8th 10th N/A Gold N/A
  2009 Liberec Silver 4th N/A Gold N/A
  2011 Oslo 8th Gold Gold Gold N/A
  2013 Val di Fiemme Silver 8th N/A Gold Silver
  2015 Falun 22nd Silver N/A Silver
  2017 Lahti 24th N/A Bronze

Ski Flying World ChampionshipsEdit

Event Individual Team
Representing   Austria
  2008 Oberstdorf Gold Gold
  2010 Planica Silver Gold
  2012 Vikersund 18th Gold
  2014 Harrachov 24th

World CupEdit

StandingsEdit

Season Overall 4H SF RA W5 P7 NT
2005/06 73 N/A N/A N/A N/A 50
2006/07 4   N/A N/A N/A N/A 24
2007/08   12 N/A N/A N/A N/A  
2008/09       N/A N/A N/A  
2009/10   4   N/A N/A N/A 4
2010/11 9 36   N/A N/A N/A N/A
2011/12     8 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2012/13       N/A N/A N/A N/A
2013/14 6 8   N/A N/A N/A N/A
2014/15 10 7 18 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2015/16 43 33 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2016/17 34 34 28 N/A N/A N/A
2017/18 35 26 46 29 23 N/A
2018/19 46 47 N/A

Individual starts (243)Edit

Season 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Points
2005/06                                             7
24
2006/07                                                 956
4 1 1 3 1 4 11 1 9 4 10 8 2 1 17 38 9 19 41
2007/08                                                       1561
4 2 9 3 2 4 2 2 1 5 42 18 6 1 8 2 2 8 2 4 1 1 1 1
2008/09                                                       2083
3 1 3 2 4 3 1 4 4 2 4 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1 10 3 1 1 5
2009/10                                               1368
19 1 4 2 1 6 9 1 1 6 5 1 1 1 7 3 1 4 11 2 12
2010/11                                                     761
14 16 14 20 18 23 5 13 6 9 19 5 5 3 1 1 8 1 4
2011/12                                                     1267
2 6 4 1 8 11 4 1 1 2 3 7 30 18 1 1 2 18 7 6 12 16 5 4
2012/13                                                       1620
8 1 4 1 25 3 1 2 2 1 1 DS 8 1 3 1 1 3 3 15 5 16 1 1 11
2013/14                                                         943
5 1 1 15 4 8 27 4 9 8 4 18 3 2 8 12 18 8 3 10 13 5 5 8
2014/15                                                               739
15 24 12 1 13 2 4 23 11 17 4 5 7 24 38 15 13 20 7 10 7 27 8 17 17 12 9
2015/16                                                           53
17 14 20 31 21 33
2016/17                                                     94
31 8 33 7 19 20 28
2017/18                                             77
22 46 34 13 19 37 33 38 40 19 17 25 q 38 27
2018/19                                                         23
48 12 q 34 45 30 42 DQ

WinsEdit

No. Season Date Location Hill Size
1 2006/07 3 December 2006     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS138 LH
2 16 December 2006     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
3 30 December 2006     Oberstdorf Schattenbergschanze HS137 (night) LH
4 7 January 2007     Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze HS140 (night) LH
5 7 February 2007     Klingenthal Vogtland Arena HS140 (night) LH
6 2007/08 1 January 2008     Garmisch-Partenkirchen Große Olympiaschanze HS140 LH
7 25 January 2008     Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS134 (night) LH
8 7 March 2008     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS138 (night) LH
9 9 March 2008     Oslo Holmenkollbakken HS128 LH
10 14 March 2008     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS215 FH
11 16 March 2008     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS215 FH
12 2008/09 6 December 2008     Trondheim Granåsen HS140 (night) LH
13 21 December 2008     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
14 10 January 2009     Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf Kulm HS200 FH
15 11 January 2009     Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf Kulm HS200 FH
16 17 January 2009     Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS134 (night) LH
17 24 January 2009     Whistler Whistler Olympic Park HS140 LH
18 25 January 2009     Whistler Whistler Olympic Park HS140 LH
19 31 January 2009     Sapporo Okurayama HS134 (night) LH
20 8 February 2009     Willingen Mühlenkopfschanze HS145 (night) LH
21 11 February 2009     Klingenthal Vogtland Arena HS140 (night) LH
22 8 March 2009     Lahti Salpausselkä HS97 NH
23 15 March 2009     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS207 (night) FH
24 20 March 2009     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS215 FH
25 2009/10 5 December 2009     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS138 (night) LH
26 19 December 2009     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
27 1 January 2010     Garmisch-Partenkirchen Große Olympiaschanze HS140 LH
28 3 January 2010     Innsbruck Bergiselschanze HS130 LH
29 10 January 2010     Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf Kulm HS200 FH
30 22 January 2010     Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS134 (night) LH
31 23 January 2010     Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS134 (night) LH
32 6 February 2010     Willingen Mühlenkopfschanze HS145 (night) LH
33 2010/11 12 February 2011     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 (night) FH
34 13 February 2011     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 FH
35 18 March 2011     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS215 FH
36 2011/12 9 December 2011     Harrachov Čerťák HS142 (night) LH
37 30 December 2011     Oberstdorf Schattenbergschanze HS137 (night) LH
38 1 January 2012     Garmisch-Partenkirchen Große Olympiaschanze HS140 LH
39 21 January 2012     Zakopane Wielka Krokiew HS134 (night) LH
40 4 February 2012     Val di Fiemme Trampolino dal Ben HS134 (night) LH
41 2012/13 25 November 2012     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS138 LH
42 8 December 2012     Soči RusSki Gorki HS106 (night) NH
43 16 December 2012     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
44 4 January 2013     Innsbruck Bergiselschanze HS130 LH
45 6 January 2013     Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze HS140 (night) LH
46 26 January 2013     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 FH
47 2 February 2013     Harrachov Čerťák HS205 FH
48 3 February 2013     Harrachov Čerťák HS205 FH
49 17 March 2013     Oslo Holmenkollbakken HS128 LH
50 22 March 2013     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS215 FH
51 2013/14 29 November 2013     Kuusamo Rukatunturi HS142 (night) LH
52 7 December 2013     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS100 (night) NH
53 2014/15 6 December 2014     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS138 (night) LH

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Gregor Schlierenzauer makes ski jumping history". CBC Sports. Archived from the original on December 8, 2013. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Gregor Schlierenzauer, profile at Red Bull, retrieved: 09.12.2011
  3. ^ "Family Business". Australian Olympic Committee (in German). 9 February 2018. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  4. ^ Gregor Schlierenzauer profile at The-Sports.org, retrieved: 09.12.2011
  5. ^ "Schlierenzauer snaps Kofler streak", Eurosport UK, retrieved: 9 December 2011
  6. ^ "WC in Planica: Forfang wins the qualification, Schlierenzauer lands on 253.5 m - Winterszus". Winterszus. 2018-03-22. Retrieved 2018-04-02.

External linksEdit