Peter Prevc (Slovene: [ˈpéːtəɾ ˈpɾéːwts]; born 20 September 1992) is a Slovenian ski jumper. He won the 2016 Ski Jumping World Cup overall title and four Olympic medals, including gold at the 2022 Winter Olympics in the mixed team event. He also won the 2016 Four Hills Tournament and 2016 Ski Flying World Championships, three consecutive Ski Flying World Cup overall titles (2014, 2015, and 2016), silver and bronze medals at the 2013 Ski Jumping World Championships, bronze at the 2014 Ski Flying World Championships, and bronze and silver with the Slovenian national team at the 2011 Ski Jumping and 2018 Ski Flying World Championships, respectively.

Peter Prevc
20161001 FIS Sommer Grand Prix Hinzenbach 5483.jpg
Prevc in Hinzenbach in 2016
CountrySlovenia
Born (1992-09-20) 20 September 1992 (age 30)
Kranj, Slovenia[1]
Height1.79 m (5 ft 10 in)[1]
Ski clubSK Triglav Kranj
Personal best250 m (820 ft) Slovenian national record
Vikersund, 14 February 2015
World Cup career
Seasons2010–present
Individual wins23
Team wins12
Indiv. podiums57
Team podiums29
Indiv. starts293
Team starts65
Overall titles1 (2016)
Four Hills titles1 (2016)
Ski Flying titles3 (2014, 2015, 2016)
Updated on 27 March 2022.

A specialist in ski flying,[2] Prevc is a former world record holder and the first athlete in history to land a jump of 250 metres (820 ft), which remains the Slovenian national distance record.[3] In 2015, in Planica, Prevc became one of the few ski jumpers in history to achieve a "perfect jump", with all five judges awarding him the maximum style points of 20.[4] In the following year, Prevc achieved the most individual World Cup competition wins in a single season – 15 – which is also a record.[5]

Prevc was named Slovenian Sportsman of the Year for four consecutive years between 2013 and 2016. In March 2016, he was voted Athlete of the Month by the United States Sports Academy, and also ranked third in the Athlete of the Year voting for 2016.

Early lifeEdit

Prevc was born in Kranj to Božidar and Julijana Prevc; the family has since been living in the village of Dolenja Vas. He has two brothers and two sisters, and is the oldest of five children.[6][7] Both his brothers, Domen and Cene, and one of his sisters, Nika, are also FIS Ski Jumping World Cup jumpers.[6] His father, who owns a furniture business, is also an international ski jumping referee.[8] When younger, he trained cross-country skiing and also tried ski jumping. His mother is a librarian.[9]

Prevc attended the first half of his elementary school education in Selca, the second half in Železniki, and gymnasium in Kranj.[10] At the age of nine, Prevc started training in ski jumping at the Bregarca K25 hill, located in Dolenja Vas.[11] At the Junior World Ski Championships in February 2009, he finished 6th in the individual and 5th in the team event.[12]

Professional careerEdit

2009–10 to 2012–13: World Cup debut and early seasonsEdit

Prevc made his World Cup debut in the 2009–10 season, finishing 22nd in Lillehammer, Norway, on 5 December 2009. In January 2010, at the Junior World Championships, Prevc finished won silver at the individual and bronze at the team event.[12]

In February 2010, he was a member of Slovenian team at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, where he finished 7th in the individual normal hill and 16th in the individual large hill. Together with Robert Kranjec, Primož Pikl, and Mitja Mežnar, Prevc finished 8th in the team large hill event.[13] He finished the World Cup season in the 35th place in the overall standings.[12]

In the 2010–11 season, Prevc first participated at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2011 in Oslo. Together with Kranjec, Jernej Damjan, and Jurij Tepeš, he won a bronze medal at the team large hill. At the end of the year, the ski jumping team was voted the Slovenian Sports Team of the Year by the Association of Slovene sports journalists.[14]

In March 2011, Prevc made his ski flying debut in Planica. In the sky flying team event, Prevc won his first World Cup podium, a third place. In the overall standings, he finished the season in 24th place.[12]

In the 2011–12 season, Prevc recorded four top 10 finishes. In February, Prevc was a member of the team that won the first ever World Cup team victory for Slovenia at the ski flying team event in Oberstdorf, together with Kranjec, Tepeš, and Jure Šinkovec. Prevc jumped 225.5 meters (which would equal the hill record) in the one-series event but fell hard after the landing and injured his shoulder.[15] He needed surgery which meant he had to finish the season early and also missed out the Ski Flying World Championships in Vikersund. Although he missed the last five events of the season, Prevc finished 15th in the overall standings.[12]

In the 2012–13 season, Prevc won three World Cup team events in Zakopane, Willingen, and Planica. At the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2013 in Val di Fiemme, Prevc won a silver medal at the individual large hill event[16] and a bronze medal at the individual normal hill event.[17]

At the last two events of the season in Planica, Prevc reached his first two individual World Cup podiums, a second and a third place. He finished the season 7th in the overall standings.[12] At the end of the year, Prevc was voted the Slovenian Sportman of the Year for the first time.[14]

2013–14 and 2014–15: The runner-upEdit

In the 2013–14 season, Prevc recorded his first individual World Cup win in Kulm. With a second place at the same venue, Prevc won the season's ski flying title since there were only two scheduled ski flying events in the season. He went on to win in Sapporo which brought him to the top of the World Cup overall standings for the first time in his career,[18] where he remained for the next couple of events.

At the end of the season, he finished second in the overall rankings, after Kamil Stoch of Poland. Prevc also won the last world cup event of the season in Planica, accumulating three wins and eleven podiums in total which was his most successful season until then.[12]

At the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, Prevc won a silver medal at the normal hill event and a bronze medal at the large hill event.[13] At the FIS Ski Flying World Championships 2014, he took bronze after the last two out of four jumps were cancelled.[12]

The 2014–15 season was very successful for Prevc, with 3 wins and 11 more podiums in the World Cup. In addition, he won two team events and one third place with the Slovenian team. On 14 February 2015, Prevc set a new ski flying world record in Vikersund with a 250 m (820 ft) jump; this record was beaten the following day with a 251.5 metres (825 ft) jump by Anders Fannemel.[3] On 20 March in Planica, Prevc achieved a "perfect jump" with all style referees awarding him maximum 20 points. At the same event, he also set a new hill record with 248.5 m.[19] Prevc spent a couple of weeks at the top of the standings during the season. At the end, he had the same number of points as Severin Freund of Germany, but the overall title went to Freund because of the higher number of victories during the season (9 for Freund and 3 for Prevc).[20] Prevc defended the ski flying title.[12]

At the 2015 World Championships, Prevc finished 4th on the large hill, 13th on the normal hill, and 6th with the Slovenian team at the team event. Prevc took two 3rd places at the 2014–15 Four Hills Tournament which secured him a 3rd place in the overall tournament standing.[12]

2015–16: The record-breaking seasonEdit

 
Prevc taking flight in Titisee-Neustadt, 2016

In the 2015–16 season, Prevc won 15 out of 29 World Cup events, the Four Hills Tournament, and the overall and ski flying titles.[12]

On 19 December in Engelberg, Peter and his younger brother Domen Prevc both finished on the podium as the first pair of brothers in World Cup history.[21] With three wins and one third place, Prevc won the 2016 Four Hills Tournament, thus becoming the second Slovenian ski jumper to win the Tournament after Primož Peterka in the 1996–97 season.[22]

On 16 January at the Ski Flying World Championships in Kulm, Prevc became the ski flying world champion. The event consisted of three rounds as the fourth round was cancelled because of strong wind. He set two hill records during the competition.[23]

On 14 February in Vikersund, Prevc won the event despite sliding upon landing (he remained on his feet nevertheless), which rarely happens in ski jumping.[24] By winning the second event in Almaty on 28 February, Prevc secured his first World Cup title, six events before the end of the season. At the end of the season, Prevc broke several statistical records. He won the highest number of points, victories, and podium finishes in a single season (2303 points, 15 victories and 22 podiums in total, the previous records being 2083 points, 13 victories, and 20 podiums by Gregor Schlierenzauer from the 2008–09 season). Other records include the point difference between the first and the second in the overall standings (813), the best average of points per event (79.4), and the highest number of points in the Four Hills Tournament (1139.4).[25][26] By winning the ski flying title, Prevc became the first ski jumper to win the title for three years in a row.[27][28]

2016–17Edit

At the first event of the 2016–17 season in Ruka, Finland, Prevc, who was leading after the first series, fell upon landing in the second series and finished third. His brother Domen scored his first World Cup victory on that occasion.[29] Throughout December, Prevc was struggling with his jumps,[30] fell again upon landing at the first event in Engelberg[31] and did not reach the final round at the second event.[31] After the Four Hill Tournament, where he finished 14th, Prevc skipped the events in Wisla.[32] Following the break, his results started to improve again. Prevc was the best individual of the team event in Zakopane, where Slovenian team finished third.[33] The team event in Willingen saw, for the first time, all three Prevc brothers representing Slovenia; together with Tepeš, they finished fourth.[34] On 11 February, he won his only event of the season in Sapporo; it was a double win with Maciej Kot.[35] Prevc's best result at the World Championships was a 4th place in mixed event and he collected five more top 10 World Cup finishes by the end of the season. He finished 9th in the overall and 5th both in the sky flying and in the inaugural Raw Air standings.[12]

Major tournament resultsEdit

Winter OlympicsEdit

Year Place Individual Team
Normal Large Men Mixed
2010   Vancouver 7 16 8 N/A
2014   Sochi     5 N/A
2018   Pyeongchang 12 10 5 N/A
2022   Beijing 4 10    

FIS Nordic World Ski ChampionshipsEdit

Year Place Individual Team
Normal Large Men Mixed
2011   Oslo 17 25   6
2013   Val di Fiemme     6 8
2015   Falun 13 4 6 5
2017   Lahti 11 9 5 4
2019   Seefeld 24 16 6 4
2021   Oberstdorf 16 5

FIS Ski Flying World ChampionshipsEdit

Year Place Individual Team
2010   Planica did not participate
2012   Vikersund
2014   Harrachov   N/A
2016   Tauplitz   4
2018   Oberstdorf 6  
2020   Planica 4
2022   Vikersund 4  

World Cup resultsEdit

StandingsEdit

Season Overall 4H SF RA W6 T5 P7 NT
2009–10 35 41 N/A N/A N/A N/A 10
2010–11 24 13 36 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2011–12 15 20 18 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2012–13 7 8 5 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2013–14   4   N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2014–15       N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2015–16       N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
2016–17 9 14 5 5 N/A N/A N/A N/A
2017–18 15 21 8 10 21 N/A 11 N/A
2018–19 29 46 25 12 30 N/A 17 N/A
2019–20 8 8 28 7 7 15 N/A N/A
2020–21 23 9 15 N/A N/A 20 N/A
2021–22 15 20 4 N/A N/A   N/A
Source:[36]

Individual winsEdit

No. Season Date Location Hill Size
1 2013–14 12 January 2014     Tauplitz/Bad Mitterndorf Kulm HS200 FH
2 25 January 2014     Sapporo Ōkurayama HS134 LH
3 23 March 2014     Planica Bloudkova velikanka HS139 LH
4 2014–15 24 January 2015     Sapporo Ōkurayama HS134 LH
5 14 February 2015     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 FH
6 20 March 2015     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 FH
7 2015–16 13 December 2015     Nizhny Tagil Tramplin Stork HS134 LH
8 19 December 2015     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
9 20 December 2015     Engelberg Gross-Titlis-Schanze HS137 LH
10 1 January 2016     Garmisch-Partenkirchen Große Olympiaschanze HS140 LH
11 3 January 2016     Innsbruck Bergiselschanze HS130 LH
12 6 January 2016     Bischofshofen Paul-Ausserleitner-Schanze HS140 LH
13 10 January 2016     Willingen Mühlenkopfschanze HS145 LH
14 30 January 2016     Sapporo Ōkurayama HS134 LH
15 10 February 2016     Trondheim Granåsen HS140 LH
16 13 February 2016     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 FH
17 14 February 2016     Vikersund Vikersundbakken HS225 FH
18 27 February 2016     Almaty Sunkar HS140 LH
19 28 February 2016     Almaty Sunkar HS140 LH
20 17 March 2016     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 FH
21 20 March 2016     Planica Letalnica bratov Gorišek HS225 FH
22 2016–17 11 February 2017     Sapporo Ōkurayama HS137 LH
23 2019–20 9 March 2020     Lillehammer Lysgårdsbakken HS140 LH
Source:[37]

Individual startsEdit

winner (1); second (2); third (3); did not compete (–); failed to qualify (q)
Season 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Points
2009–10                                               106
22 31 q 26 27 32 28 36 q 14 26 17 14 19 14
2010–11                                                     218
12 25 32 31 32 39 17 12 27 11 18 23 11 12 18 24 q 16 21 17
2011–12                                                     400
16 24 23 14 21 42 20 31 19 11 20 21 13 4 6 35 7 13 10 4 8
2012–13                                                       744
10 9 15 13 q 14 6 18 10 5 15 26 11 15 9 26 5 5 20 7 4 18 13 6 15 2 3
2013–14                                                         1312
21 12 23 14 27 11 15 8 3 18 6 2 2 1 5 2 1 2 7 3 2 4 6 4 45 11 3 1
2014–15                                                               1729
5 9 4 5 2 5 9 5 12 3 3 11 4 4 2 4 1 3 2 4 3 7 1 16 4 17 2 2 3 1 2
2015–16                                                           2303
2 11 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 3 1 6 1 4 1 1 5 9 4 1 1 5 2 1 2 1
2016–17                                                     716
3 7 22 30 9 26 33 10 11 19 23 13 9 6 4 1 6 13 4 16 7 6 10 6
2017–18                                             416
20 23 13 40 15 16 14 41 8 23 8 6 3 20 20 46 7 8 14 15 8
2018–19                                                         179
35 16 18 q 40 53 q 20 40 3 26 12 16 10 19
2019–20                                                       789
15 28 8 8 8 12 2 21 12 9 5 17 7 22 18 10 7 4 8 33 20 4 16 18 15 1 5
2020–21                                                   230
30 29 18 36 13 14 33 17 13 11 12 21 13 31 12 19 11 23
2021–22                                                         460
11 6 21 25 41 25 29 19 38 28 21 16 13 12 8 16 20 8 25 8 12 2 3
Source:[38]

Awards and nominationsEdit

Year Category Voted by Result
2011 Slovenian Team of the Year Slovene sports journalists association Won[39]
2013 Slovenian Sportsman of the Year Slovene sports journalists association Won[39]
2014 Slovenian Sportsman of the Year Slovene sports journalists association Won[39]
2015 Slovenian Sportsman of the Year Slovene sports journalists association Won[39]
2016 Athlete of the Month for March United States Sports Academy Won[40]
Slovenian Sportsman of the Year Slovene sports journalists association Won[39]
European Sportsperson of the Year European Alliance of News Agencies 16th[41]
Athlete of the Year United States Sports Academy 3rd[42]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Peter Prevc – Player Profile – Ski Jumping". Eurosport. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  2. ^ Dumančič, Mojca (5 May 2016). "Photo: Peter Prevc – The man in blue" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Ski jump: watch Anders Fannemel set the new world record". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 16 February 2015. Retrieved 16 February 2015.
  4. ^ "Popolno: Rekord in zmaga Prevca, Tepeš drugi!" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenia. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  5. ^ "Ski Jumping: Prevc breaks record for season wins!". Euronews. 17 March 2016. Retrieved 17 March 2016.
  6. ^ a b "Mama Petra Prevca: Strah me je! A ne na zaletišču, nekje drugje". Ekipa24 (in Slovenian). Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  7. ^ Kastelic, Peter (2 February 2015). "Najmlajši od bratov Prevc: O skokih se doma redko pogovarjamo" (in Slovenian). Siol. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  8. ^ Lopatič, Jaka (20 January 2016). "Oče Petra Prevca bo v Oslu pod dodatnim drobnogledom" (in Slovenian). Siol. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  9. ^ Karneža Cerjak, Biserka (5 February 2017). "Družinske korenine: vsi v družini Prevc so se zapisali športu že v otroštvu". reporter.si (in Slovenian). Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  10. ^ "PREVC Peter". gorenjci.si (in Slovenian). Archived from the original on 28 October 2018. Retrieved 14 March 2019.
  11. ^ Bandur, Simona (14 February 2016). "Gospod inženir, skakalnica je narejena". Delo (in Slovenian). Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "PREVC Peter – Biographie". fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  13. ^ a b "Peter Prevc Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. 20 September 1992. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  14. ^ a b "Športnik leta | DŠNS". Dsns.si (in Slovenian). Archived from the original on 26 December 2016. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  15. ^ "Video: Kljub nesrečnemu Prevcu skakalci pisali zgodovino :: Prvi interaktivni multimedijski portal, MMC RTV Slovenija" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. 19 February 2012. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  16. ^ "Individual large hill event at FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2013" (PDF). fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 28 February 2013.
  17. ^ "Individual normal hill event at FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2013" (PDF). fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 23 February 2013.
  18. ^ "Peter Prevc took a clear win in Sapporo". fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  19. ^ "Norišnica v Planici: dvojna zmaga Slovenije, Prevc Freundu diha za ovratnik" (in Slovenian). Siol. Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  20. ^ "Dvojna slovenska zmaga z grenkim priokusom: Tepeš prvi in Prevc drugi, Freundu globus" [Bitter double win for Slovenia: Tepeš first, Prevc second and overall title for Freund]. Delo (in Slovenian). Retrieved 12 December 2015.
  21. ^ "Zgodovinsko: dvojna zmaga bratov Prevc" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 19 December 2015.
  22. ^ "Slovenija navdušena: kralj Peter šampionsko dokončal delo" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  23. ^ M.R. (16 January 2016). "Prevc z novim rekordom Kulma svetovni prvak!" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  24. ^ T. O.; S. J. (14 February 2016). "Ljubezen med Prevcem in Vikersundom: Peter slavil kljub padcu" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 27 November 2016.
  25. ^ Z. J. Ljubljana (20 March 2016). "Peter Prevc rekordi sezona smucarski skoki clanek". zurnal24.si (in Slovenian).
  26. ^ "Prevc z zmago v Planici podrl se dva rekorda". Planica – AP. 17 March 2016.
  27. ^ "Prevc: taka sezona se bo težko še kdaj ponovila" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 20 March 2016.
  28. ^ "Peter Prevc v lovu na se en rekord in mali kristalni globus" (in Slovenian). Planica. 18 March 2016.
  29. ^ A. V. (25 November 2016). "Video: Po padcu Petra prva zmaga za Domna Prevca" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  30. ^ "Peter Prevc" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. 17 December 2016. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  31. ^ a b Jamnik, Tilen (17 December 2016). "Domen Prevc z 8. skočil na 2. mesto, v finalu nesrečen padec Petra" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  32. ^ T. O.; J. B. (9 January 2017). "Peter Prevc takes a break from ski jumping competition for several days". RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  33. ^ Jamnik, Tilen (26 January 2017). "Peter v Zakopanah že delal, kar ima najraje – skakal daleč" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  34. ^ T. J.; R. K. (28 January 2017). "Slovenski skakalci 120 točk za stopničkami" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  35. ^ Jerič, Slavko (15 February 2017). "Peter Prevc blizu še enega rekorda Mattija Nykänena" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 2 March 2017.
  36. ^ "Season-by-season rankings in World Cup". fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  37. ^ "All positions in World Cup, sorted by performance". fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  38. ^ "All positions in World Cup, sorted by date". fis-ski.com. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 18 November 2018.
  39. ^ a b c d e M. L.; A. V. (13 December 2016). "Športniki leta Peter Prevc, Tina Trstenjak in slovenski hokejisti" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  40. ^ "Ski Jumper Peter Prevc and Tennis Player Victoria Azarenka Voted Academy Athletes of the Month for March". ussa.edu. 18 April 2016. Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  41. ^ M. L. (26 December 2016). "CR7 evropski športnik leta; Prevc na 16. mestu" (in Slovenian). RTV Slovenija. Retrieved 28 December 2016.
  42. ^ "Phelps, Biles Named Academy's 2016 Male and Female Athletes of the Year". The Sport Digest. 25 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.

External linksEdit

Records
Preceded by
Johan Remen Evensen
246.5 m (809 ft)
World's longest ski jump
250 m (820 ft)

14 February 2015 – 15 February 2015
Succeeded by
Anders Fannemel
251.5 m (825 ft)