Australia men's national field hockey team

The Australia men's national field hockey team (nicknamed the Kookaburras) is one of the nation's most successful top-level sporting teams. They are the only Australian team in any sport to receive medals at the last six Summer Olympic Games (1992–2012). The Kookaburras placed in the top four in every Olympics between 1980 and 2012; in 2016, the Kookaburras placed sixth.[2] They also won the Hockey World Cup in 1986, 2010 and 2014.

Australia
Australia
NicknameKookaburras
AssociationHockey Australia
ConfederationOHF (Oceania)
CoachColin Batch
Assistant coach(es)Anthony Potter
ManagerNathan Eglington
CaptainAran Zalewski
Most capsEddie Ockenden
Team colours Team colours Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Home
Team colours Team colours Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Away
FIH ranking
Current 2 Steady (1 March 2020)[1]
Highest1 (2005, 2010–2011, 2014 – January 2017, December 2017 – July 2018, June 2019 – January 2020)
Lowest3 (2003)
Olympic Games
Appearances15 (first in 1956)
Best result1st (2004)
World Cup
Appearances13 (first in 1971)
Best result1st (1986, 2010, 2014)
Oceania Cup
Appearances11 (first in 1999)
Best result1st (1999–2017)
Australia at the 2008 Olympics
Australia at the 2012 Olympics

The Kookaburras' inability to win an Olympic gold medal despite their perennial competitiveness, led many in the Australian hockey community to speak of a "curse" afflicting the team,[3] finally broken in 2004 with the win in Athens.

HistoryEdit

Australia's first men's team competed in an international match in 1922.[4]

The first major competition won by the national team was the 1983 World Championships held in Karachi.[5]

ParticipationsEdit

Australia's first men's team competed at the Olympics in field hockey at the 1956 Summer Olympics.[5]

Australia did not medal at the 1984 Summer Olympics[6] or the 1988 Summer Olympics.[7] At the 1992 Summer Olympics, Australia earned a silver medal, losing gold to Germany.[8] At the 1996 Summer Olympics, Australia finished third, earning a bronze medal.[9]

The team won their first Olympic gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Barry Dancer coached the side.[10]

Should Australia win the gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics they will become the first national team in field hockey history to hold all four international titles available to them simultaneously. They would hold titles in the 2012 Olympics, 2010 World Cup, 2011 Champions Trophy and their continental championship (2011 Oceania Cup) at the same time. Along with those four titles Australia also holds the Commonwealth Games title from the 2010 championships.

Tournament recordsEdit

World Cup[11]
Year Host city Position
1971   Barcelona, Spain 8th
1973   Amsterdam, Netherlands
1975   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 5th
1978   Buenos Aires, Argentina 3rd
1982   Bombay, India 3rd
1986   London, England 1st
1990   Lahore, Pakistan 3rd
1994   Sydney, Australia 3rd
1998   Utrecht, Netherlands 4th
2002   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2nd
2006   Mönchengladbach, Germany 2nd
2010   New Delhi, India 1st
2014   The Hague, Netherlands 1st
2018   Bhubaneswar, India 3rd
Champions Trophy[12]
Year Host city Position
1978   Lahore, Pakistan 2nd
1980   Karachi, Pakistan 3rd
1981   Karachi, Pakistan 2nd
1982   Amstelveen, Netherlands 2nd
1983   Karachi, Pakistan 1st
1984   Karachi, Pakistan 1st
1985   Perth, Australia 1st
1986   Lahore, Pakistan 2nd
1987   Amstelveen, Netherlands 3rd
1988   Lahore, Pakistan 3rd
1989   Berlin, West Germany 1st
1990   Melbourne, Australia 1st
1991   Berlin, Germany 4th
1992   Karachi, Pakistan 2nd
1993   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
1994   Lahore, Pakistan 4th
1995   Berlin, Germany 2nd
1996   Madras, India 6th
1997   Adelaide, Australia 2nd
1998   Lahore, Pakistan 3rd
1999   Brisbane, Australia 1st
2000   Amstelveen, Netherlands 5th
2001   Rotterdam, Netherlands 2nd
2002   Cologne, Germany 5th
2003   Amstelveen, Netherlands 2nd
2004   Lahore, Pakistan
2005   Chennai, India 1st
2006   Terrassa, Spain 4th
2007   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2nd
2008   Rotterdam, Netherlands 1st
2009   Melbourne, Australia 1st
2010   Mönchengladbach, Germany 1st
2011   Auckland, New Zealand 1st
2012   Melbourne, Australia 1st
2014   Bhubaneswar, India 3rd
2016   London, United Kingdom 1st
2018   Breda, Netherlands 1st
World League[13]
Year Round Host city Position
2012–13 Semifinal   Rotterdam, Netherlands 2nd
Final   New Delhi, India 4th
2014–15 Semifinal   Antwerp, Belgium 1st
Final   Raipur, India 1st
2016–17 Semifinal   Johannesburg, South Africa 3rd
Final   Bhubaneswar, India 1st
Commonwealth Games[14]
Year Host city Position
1998   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
2002   Manchester, England 1st
2006   Melbourne, Australia 1st
2010   New Delhi, India 1st
2014   Glasgow, Scotland 1st
2018   Gold Coast, Australia 1st
Pro League[15]
Year Host city Position
2019   Amstelveen, Netherlands 1st
Olympic Games[16]
Year Host city Position
1908   London, United Kingdom
1920   Antwerp, Belgium
1928   Amsterdam, Netherlands
1932   Los Angeles, United States
1936   Berlin, Germany
1948   London, United Kingdom
1952   Helsinki, Finland
1956   Melbourne, Australia 5th
1960   Rome, Italy 6th
1964   Tokyo, Japan 3rd
1968   Mexico City, Mexico 2nd
1972   Munich, Germany 5th
1976   Montreal, Canada 2nd
1980   Moscow, Soviet Union N/A
1984   Los Angeles, United States 4th
1988   Seoul, South Korea 4th
1992   Barcelona, Spain 2nd
1996   Atlanta, United States 3rd
2000   Sydney, Australia 3rd
2004   Athens, Greece 1st
2008   Beijing, China 3rd
2012   London, United Kingdom 3rd
2016   Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 6th
2020   Tokyo, Japan Qualified
2024   Paris, France TBD
2028   Los Angeles, United States TBD
Oceania Cup[17]
Year Host city Position
1999   Brisbane, Australia 1st
2001   Melbourne, Australia 1st
2003   Christchurch & Wellington, New Zealand 1st
2005   Suva, Fiji 1st
2007   Buderim, Australia 1st
2009   Invercargill, New Zealand 1st
2011   Hobart, Australia 1st
2013   Stratford, New Zealand 1st
2015   Stratford, New Zealand 1st
2017   Sydney, Australia 1st
2019   Rockhampton, Australia 1st
Sultan Azlan Shah Cup[18]
Year Host city Position
1983   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
1985   Ipoh, Malaysia
1987   Ipoh, Malaysia
1991   Ipoh, Malaysia
1994   Penang, Malaysia 3rd
1995   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
1996   Ipoh, Malaysia 2nd
1998   Ipoh, Malaysia 1st
1999   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2000   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2001   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 3rd
2003   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2004   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
2005   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
2006   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 2nd
2007   Ipoh, Malaysia 1st
2008   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2009   Ipoh, Malaysia
2010   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 3rd
2011   Ipoh, Malaysia 1st
2012   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2013   Ipoh, Malaysia 1st
2014   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
2015   Ipoh, Malaysia 2nd
2016   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st
2017   Ipoh, Malaysia 2nd
2018   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 1st

TeamEdit

Current squadEdit

The following 18 players represented Australia during the FIH Pro League match against Great Britain on 2 February 2020, in Sydney, Australia.[19]

Caps and goals are current as of 2 February 2020 after the match against the Great Britain.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
24 1GK Tyler Lovell (1987-05-23) 23 May 1987 (age 33) 143 0   Perth Thundersticks
30 1GK Andrew Charter (1987-03-30) 30 March 1987 (age 33) 179 0   Canberra Chill

3 2DF Corey Weyer (1996-03-28) 28 March 1996 (age 24) 40 3   Brisbane Blaze
4 2DF Jake Harvie (1998-03-05) 5 March 1998 (age 22) 66 3   Perth Thundersticks
6 2DF Matthew Dawson (1994-04-27) 27 April 1994 (age 26) 136 12   NSW Pride
16 2DF Tim Howard (1996-06-23) 23 June 1996 (age 24) 58 1   Brisbane Blaze
20 2DF Matthew Swann (1989-05-16) 16 May 1989 (age 31) 202 7   Brisbane Blaze
32 2DF Jeremy Hayward (1993-03-03) 3 March 1993 (age 27) 153 64   Tassie Tigers

1 3MF Lachlan Sharp (1997-07-02) 2 July 1997 (age 23) 46 10   NSW Pride
2 3MF Tom Craig (1995-09-03) 3 September 1995 (age 24) 101 29   NSW Pride
11 3MF Eddie Ockenden (C) (1987-04-03) 3 April 1987 (age 33) 362 71   Tassie Tigers
17 3MF Aran Zalewski (C) (1991-03-21) 21 March 1991 (age 29) 187 24   Perth Thundersticks
18 3MF Kurt Lovett (1997-01-15) 15 January 1997 (age 23) 1 0   NSW Pride
22 3MF Flynn Ogilvie (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 26) 107 22   NSW Pride

12 4FW Jacob Whetton (1991-06-15) 15 June 1991 (age 29) 201 64   Brisbane Blaze
25 4FW Trent Mitton (1990-11-26) 26 November 1990 (age 29) 170 77   Perth Thundersticks
26 4FW Dylan Wotherspoon (1993-04-09) 9 April 1993 (age 27) 89 31   Brisbane Blaze
29 4FW Timothy Brand (1998-11-29) 29 November 1998 (age 21) 38 16   NSW Pride

The remainder of the 2020 national squad is as follows:[20]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Johan Durst (1991-03-18) 18 March 1991 (age 29) 3 0   HC Melbourne v.   India; May 17, 2019

DF Joshua Beltz (1995-04-24) 24 April 1995 (age 25) 39 3   Tassie Tigers v.   Japan; August 7, 2019
DF Joshua Simmonds (1995-10-04) 4 October 1995 (age 24) 17 0   HC Melbourne v.   Belgium; June 30, 2019

MF Daniel Beale (1993-02-12) 12 February 1993 (age 27) 173 28   Brisbane Blaze v.   Belgium; January 26, 2020

FW Tom Wickham (1990-05-26) 26 May 1990 (age 30) 51 21   Perth Thundersticks v.   Great Britain; February 1, 2020
FW Nathan Ephraums (1999-06-09) 9 June 1999 (age 21) 1 0   HC Melbourne
FW Jacob Anderson (1997-03-22) 22 March 1997 (age 23) 21 8   Brisbane Blaze v.   Belgium; January 26, 2020
FW Blake Govers (1996-07-06) 6 July 1996 (age 24) 97 83   NSW Pride v.   New Zealand; September 8, 2019
FW Jack Welch (1997-10-26) 26 October 1997 (age 22) 8 2   Tassie Tigers v.   New Zealand; March 17, 2019

Notable playersEdit

ResultsEdit

2020 Fixtures & ResultsEdit

2020 Statistics
Pld W WD LD L GF GA GD Pts
4 1 1 1 1 13 11 +2 6

FIH Pro LeagueEdit

25 January 2020 Home 1Australia  2–2
(2–4 p)
  BelgiumSydney, Australia
18:30 Hayward   49'
Craig   51'
Report Briels   18'
Denayer   59'
Stadium: Sydney Olympic Park
Penalties
Brand  
Ogilvie  
Craig  
Swann  
  Van Aubel
  De Sloover
  Gougnard
  Wegnez
  A. van Doren
26 January 2020 Home 2Australia  2–4  BelgiumSydney, Australia
17:30 Sharp   42'
Hayward   60'
Report Hendrickx   13'25'
Plennevaux   56'
Stockbroekx   58'
Stadium: Sydney Olympic Park
1 February 2020 Home 3Australia  4–4
(3–1 p)
  Great BritainSydney, Australia
16:00 Ockenden   19'
Wickham   29'
Zalewski   56'
Mitton   59'
Report Jackson   20'
Wallace   31'
Shipperley   44'
Ansell   45'
Stadium: Sydney Olympic Park
Penalties
Swann  
Whetton  
Harvie  
Ogilvie  
  Forsyth
  Sorsby
  Roper
  Wallace
2 February 2020 Home 4Australia  5–1  Great BritainSydney, Australia
15:00 Wotherspoon   14'
Sharp   19'
Craig   29'
Brand   45'
Mitton   55'
Report Taylor   18' Stadium: Sydney Olympic Park
21 February 2020 Away 1India  v  AustraliaBhubaneswar, India
19:00 Report Stadium: Kalinga Stadium
22 February 2020 Away 2India  v  AustraliaBhubaneswar, India
19:00 Report Stadium: Kalinga Stadium
14 March 2020 Away 3Spain  v  AustraliaValencia, Spain
13:00 Report Stadium: Estadio Beteró
15 March 2020 Away 4Spain  v  AustraliaValencia, Spain
13:00 Report Stadium: Estadio Beteró

2020 Goalscoring TableEdit

Scorers
Rank Player FG PC PS Total
1 Tom Craig 1 0 1 2
Jeremy Hayward 0 2 0
Trent Mitton 2 0 0
Lachlan Sharp 2 0 0
2 Timothy Brand 0 1 0 1
Eddie Ockenden 0 1 0
Tom Wickham 1 0 0
Dylan Wotherspoon 1 0 0
Aran Zalewski 0 1 0
Total 7 5 1 13

FamilyEdit

Barry Dancer/Brent Dancer and Ric Charlesworth/Jonathan Charlesworth are two pairs of father as coach and son as player while both were affiliated with the national team in those positions.[10][21]

RecognitionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIH Men's and Women's World Ranking". FIH. 1 March 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2020.
  2. ^ ABC (15 August 2016). "Rio 2016: Australia's Kookaburras and Sharks knocked out of men's hockey and water polo". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  3. ^ "Kookaburras ready to toss the monkey". Sydney Morning Herald. 26 August 2004. Archived from the original on 27 July 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2012.
  4. ^ Epstein, Jackie (21 October 2009). "Dwyer breaks free of Holland binds – Australia always comes first". Herald Sun. Melbourne, Australia. p. 76. Retrieved 15 March 2012.
  5. ^ a b Department of Sport, Recreation and Tourism; Australian Sport Commission (1985). Australian Sport, a profile. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publish Service. pp. 177–178. ISBN 0644036672.
  6. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 320. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092.
  7. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 327. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092.
  8. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 335. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092.
  9. ^ Dorling Kindersley Limited. (1999). The Olympic Games. St. Leonards, N.S.W.: Dorling Kindersley. p. 343. ISBN 1864660635. OCLC 57337092.
  10. ^ a b Petrie, Andrea (18 October 2009). "Sons a chip off the old stick – HOCKEY". The Sunday Age. Melbourne, Australia. p. 19. Retrieved 14 March 2012.
  11. ^ "World Cup – FIH". International Hockey Federation.
  12. ^ "Champions Trophy – FIH". FIH.
  13. ^ "Home – FIH".
  14. ^ "Home – FIH".
  15. ^ "FIH confirms Spain men and Belgium women join Hockey Pro League". FIH.
  16. ^ "Home – FIH".
  17. ^ "Oceania Cup". Hockey Australia. Archived from the original on 11 January 2017. Retrieved 1 June 2018.
  18. ^ "Other – FIH". FIH.
  19. ^ "Australia – Great Britain". tms.fih.ch. International Hockey Federation. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  20. ^ "Kookaburras squad announced for 2020". hockey.org.au. Hockey Australia. Retrieved 21 November 2019.
  21. ^ Department of Sport, Recreation and Tourism; Australian Sport Commission (1985). Australian Sport, a profile. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Publish Service. p. 116. ISBN 0644036672.
  22. ^ a b c "Australian Sports Awards". Confederation of Australian Sport. Archived from the original on 8 February 2015. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  23. ^ "Rabbitohs, Fearnley, Fox win top ASPAS". Australian Sports Commission News, 11 February 2015. Archived from the original on 11 February 2015. Retrieved 11 February 2015.

External linksEdit