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Germany men's national field hockey team

The Germany men's national field hockey team is one of the most successful sides in the world, winning gold at the Summer Olympics four times (including once as West Germany), the Hockey World Cup twice, the EuroHockey Nations Championship eight times (including twice as West Germany) and the Hockey Champions Trophy nine times (including three times as West Germany). The team is currently coached by former women's coach Markus Weise.

Germany
Germany
AssociationDeutscher Hockey-Bund
(German Hockey Federation)
ConfederationEHF (Europe)
CoachStefan Kermas
ManagerEric Verboom
CaptainMartin Häner
Home
Away
FIH ranking
Current 6 Steady (22 January 2019)[1]
Highest1 (2003–2004, 2006–2009, 2012–2013)
Lowest6 (July 2018 – present)
Summer Olympics
Appearances18 (first in 1908)
Best result1st (1972, 1992, 2008, 2012)
World Cup
Appearances14 (first in 1971)
Best result1st (2002, 2006)
EuroHockey Championships
Appearances16 (first in 1970)
Best result1st (1970, 1978, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2011, 2013)
Semifinal match 2006 between Germany and Spain

Contents

Tournament HistoryEdit

The team caused an upset in the 2002 Men's Hockey World Cup when they defeated Australia 2–1 with striker Olivier Domke scoring the winner after Germany came back from being 1–0 down. After this period the Germans went through a transition period, finishing lowly in the 2003 Men's Hockey Champions Trophy and the 2004 Men's Hockey Champions Trophy with several inexperienced players in their squad. Coach Bernhard Peters was looking to nurture the players for the World Cup such as Christopher Zeller, Moritz Fürste and Timo Wess, and was successful as the Germans won the 2006 Men's Hockey World Cup in Mönchengladbach, defeating Australia 4–3 in the final. Bernhard Peters left the team in order to pursue a career in football and is now a staff member at TSG 1899 Hoffenheim.[2]

On 6 November 2006 Markus Wiese was appointed as the new head coach. Success at the 2007 Men's Hockey Champions Trophy and a gold medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics followed this. Germany headed into the 2010 Men's Hockey World Cup with a largely young and inexperienced squad, but reached the final of the World Cup after strong performances throughout the tournament. In the final, they were defeated 2–1 by Australia.

Germany have played in the annual 2011 Hockey Champions Trophy held in Auckland, New Zealand. The team competed in pool B with Korea, Netherlands and host nation New Zealand. The team finished fifth in the tournament.

Summer OlympicsEdit

World CupEdit

World LeagueEdit

Champions TrophyEdit

EuroHockey Nations ChampionshipEdit

TeamEdit

Current squadEdit

The following 18 players were named for the Pro League match against Spain on 15 March 2019.[3]

Head coach: Stefan Kermas

Caps updated as of 15 March 2019, after the match against Spain.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) CapsClub
1 GK Mark Appel (1994-07-05) 5 July 1994 (age 24) 19   Club an der Alster
30 GK Victor Aly (1994-06-02) 2 June 1994 (age 24) 5   Rot-Weiss Köln

4 DF Lukas Windfeder (1995-05-11) 11 May 1995 (age 23) 95   Uhlenhorst Mülheim
6 DF Martin Häner (Captain) (1988-08-27) 27 August 1988 (age 30) 224   Berliner HC
15 DF Tom Grambusch (1995-08-04) 4 August 1995 (age 23) 53   Rot-Weiss Köln
18 DF Ferdinand Weinke (1995-01-26) 26 January 1995 (age 24) 44   Uhlenhorst Mülheim
29 DF Johannes Große (1997-01-07) 7 January 1997 (age 22) 30   Rot-Weiss Köln

14 MF Jan-Philipp Rabente (1987-07-03) 3 July 1987 (age 31) 161   Hamburg
24 MF Benedikt Fürk (1988-10-20) 20 October 1988 (age 30) 151   Uhlenhorst Mülheim
26 MF Niklas Bosserhoff (1998-04-15) 15 April 1998 (age 21) 7   Uhlenhorst Mülheim
28 MF Moritz Rothländer (1997-11-10) 10 November 1997 (age 21) 14   TSV Mannheim

3 FW Mats Grambusch (1992-11-04) 4 November 1992 (age 26) 131   Rot-Weiss Köln
7 FW Timur Oruz (1994-10-27) 27 October 1994 (age 24) 55   Rot-Weiss Köln
9 FW Niklas Wellen (1994-12-14) 14 December 1994 (age 24) 110   Krefeld
16 FW Dieter Linnekogel (1992-07-15) 15 July 1992 (age 26) 56   Club an der Alster
19 FW Thies Prinz (1998-07-07) 7 July 1998 (age 20) 14   Rot-Weiss Köln
22 FW Marco Miltkau (1990-08-18) 18 August 1990 (age 28) 87   Rot-Weiss Köln
27 FW Anton Boeckel (1995-03-23) 23 March 1995 (age 24) 20   Club an der Alster

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up for the national team in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Club Latest call-up
GK Tobias Walter (1990-02-16) 16 February 1990 (age 29) 47   Dragons v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019

DF Mathias Müller (1992-04-03) 3 April 1992 (age 27) 92   Hamburger Polo Club v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019
DF Teo Hinrichs (1999-09-17) 17 September 1999 (age 19) 6   Mannheimer HC v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019
DF Julius Meyer (1995-04-21) 21 April 1995 (age 23) 44   Uhlenhorst Mülheim v.   New Zealand, 15 February 2019
DF Tobias Hauke (1987-09-11) 11 September 1987 (age 31) 301   Harvestehude 2018 World Cup
DF Philipp Huber (1993-05-02) 2 May 1993 (age 25) 14   Mannheimer HC v.   Great Britain, 22 June 2018
DF Max Kapaun (1994-10-26) 26 October 1994 (age 24) 13   Hamburg v.   Ireland, 19 May 2018

MF Constantin Staib (1995-08-31) 31 August 1995 (age 23) 55   Hamburger Polo Club v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019
MF Dan Nguyen Luong (1991-12-08) 8 December 1991 (age 27) 51   Mannheimer HC v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019

FW Florian Fuchs (1991-11-10) 10 November 1991 (age 27) 194   Bloemendaal v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019
FW Timm Herzbruch (1997-06-07) 7 June 1997 (age 21) 61   Uhlenhorst Mülheim v.   Netherlands, 5 March 2019
FW Christopher Rühr (1993-12-19) 19 December 1993 (age 25) 123   Rot-Weiss Köln v.   New Zealand, 15 February 2019
FW Niklas Bruns (1994-06-29) 29 June 1994 (age 24) 24   Club an der Alster v.   Spain, 14 November 2018

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FIH Hero World Rankings January 2019 – Men" (PDF). FIH. 22 January 2019. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  2. ^ "The German Times Online – Football Inc". Archived from the original on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2014.
  3. ^ "Lineups". tms.fih.ch. International Hockey Federation. Retrieved 13 March 2019.

External linksEdit