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2018 United States Senate elections

Elections to the United States Senate were held on November 6, 2018. Thirty-three of the 100 seats were contested in regular elections, while two others were contested in special elections due to Senate vacancies in Minnesota and Mississippi. The winners were elected to six-year terms running from January 3, 2019, to January 3, 2025. Senate Democrats had 26 seats up for election (including the seats of two independents who caucus with them), while Senate Republicans had nine seats up for election.

2018 United States Senate elections

← 2016 November 6, 2018 2020 →

33 of the 100 seats (Class 1) in the United States Senate
(and 2 special elections)
51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  Mitch McConnell 2016 crop.jpg Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped).jpg
Leader Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer
Party Republican Democratic
Leader since January 3, 2007 January 3, 2017
Leader's seat Kentucky New York
Last election 52 46
Seats before 51 47
Seats after 53 45
Seat change Increase 2 Decrease 2
Popular vote 33,930,718 49,505,719[a]
Percentage 39.8% 58.0%[a]
Swing Decrease 2.6% Increase 4.2%
Seats up 9 24
Races won 11 22

  Third party
 
Party Independent
Seats before 2
Seats after 2
Seat change Steady
Popular vote 765,817
Percentage 0.9%
Swing Increase 0.4%
Seats up 2
Races won 2

2018 United States Senate election in Arizona2018 United States Senate election in California2018 United States Senate election in Connecticut2018 United States Senate election in Delaware2018 United States Senate election in Florida2018 United States Senate election in Hawaii2018 United States Senate election in Indiana2018 United States Senate election in Maine2018 United States Senate election in Maryland2018 United States Senate election in Massachusetts2018 United States Senate election in Michigan2018 United States Senate election in Minnesota2018 United States Senate election in Mississippi2018 United States Senate election in Missouri2018 United States Senate election in Montana2018 United States Senate election in Nebraska2018 United States Senate election in Nevada2018 United States Senate election in New Jersey2018 United States Senate election in New Mexico2018 United States Senate election in New York2018 United States Senate election in North Dakota2018 United States Senate election in Ohio2018 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2018 United States Senate election in Rhode Island2018 United States Senate election in Tennessee2018 United States Senate election in Texas2018 United States Senate election in Utah2018 United States Senate election in Vermont2018 United States Senate election in Virginia2018 United States Senate election in West Virginia2018 United States Senate election in Wyoming2018 United States Senate election in Washington2018 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2018 United States Senate elections.svg
About this image
Results of the general and special elections
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold
     Independent hold
Line through state means both seats are up for election.

Majority Leader before election

Mitch McConnell
Republican

Elected Majority Leader

Mitch McConnell
Republican

To maintain their working majority of 50 Senators and Republican Vice President Mike Pence (who is able to cast a tie-breaking vote in accordance with Article One of the United States Constitution), Republicans could only afford a net loss of one Senate seat in the 2018 elections. Three Republican-held seats were open as a result of retirements in Tennessee, Utah, and Arizona. Democrats were defending ten seats in states won by Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election, while Republicans were only defending one seat in a state won by Hillary Clinton in 2016.

The Republicans maintained a Senate majority following the 2018 elections, defeating Democratic incumbents in four states (Florida, Indiana, Missouri, and North Dakota). Democrats defeated a Republican incumbent in Nevada and gained an open seat in Arizona. This was only the fourth time since World War II that a president's party made Senate gains in a midterm election (the others were John F. Kennedy in 1962, Richard Nixon in 1970, and George W. Bush in 2002).

Contents

Focus on competitive racesEdit

Democrats targeted Republican-held Senate seats in Arizona (open seat) and Nevada.[3] Seats in Texas,[4] Mississippi (at least one of the two seats) and Tennessee (open seat)[5] were also competitive for the Democrats. Republicans targeted Democratic-held seats in Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota and West Virginia, all of which voted for Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election and Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election.[6] Seats in Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan, all of which voted for Trump in 2016, were also targeted by Republicans.[7][3]

Partisan compositionEdit

Among the 33 Class 1 Senate seats up for regular election in 2018, twenty-three were held by Democrats, two by independents who caucused with the Senate Democrats and eight by Republicans. Class Two seats in Minnesota and Mississippi held by interim appointees were also up for election; both incumbent appointees sought election to finish their unexpired terms.

According to FiveThirtyEight, Democrats faced the most unfavorable Senate map in 2018 that any party has ever faced in any election.[8][9]

The 2018 election cycle was the first midterm election cycle since 2002 in which any incumbents of the non-presidential party lost bids for re-election, and the most since the 1934 midterms.[10]

Results summaryEdit

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent Libertarian Green Other
Last election (2016) 46 52 2 0 0 0 100
Before these elections 47 51 2 0 0 0 100
Not up 23 42 0 65
Class 2 (20142020) 11 20 0 31
Class 3 (20162022) 12 22 0 34
Up 24 9 2 35
Class 1 (2012→2018) 23 8 2 33
Special: Class 2 1 1 0 2
General elections
Incumbent retired 0 3 0 3
Held by same party 2 2
Replaced by other party   1 Republicans replaced by   1 Democrat         1
Result 1 2 0 0 0 0 3
Incumbent ran 23 5 2 30
Won re-election 19 4 2 25
Lost re-election   1 Republican replaced by   1 Democrat
  4 Democrats replaced by   4 Republicans
        5
Result 20 8 2 0 0 0 30
Special elections
Appointee ran 1 1 2
Appointee elected 1 1 2
Result 1 1 0 0 0 0 2
Total elected 22 11 2 0 0 0 35
Net gain/loss   2   2         2
Nationwide vote ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
Share ? ? ? ? ? ? 100%
Result 45 53 2 0 0 0 100

Change in compositionEdit

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so that the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the electionsEdit

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election. Some "Ran" for re-election, some "Retired" and the remainder (without a note) were not up for election this year. Before the elections, Republicans held 51 seats, Democrats held 47, and independents held two.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24
Ran
D25
Ran
D26
Ran
D27
Ran
D28
Ran
D29
Ran
D30
Ran
D40
Ran
D39
Ran
D38
Ran
D37
Ran
D36
Ran
D35
Ran
D34
Ran
D33
Ran
D32
Ran
D31
Ran
D41
Ran
D42
Ran
D43
Ran
D44
Ran
D45
Ran
D46
Ran
D47
Appointee ran
I1
Ran
I2
Ran
R51
Retired
Majority →
R41 R42 R43
Ran
R44
Ran
R45
Ran
R46
Ran
R47
Ran
R48
Appointee ran
R49
Retired
R50
Retired
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the general electionsEdit

Each block indicates the results of each election. Some senators were "Re-elected", some were a "Gain" in the seat from the other party (either by beating an incumbent or by winning an open seat), some were a "Hold" by the same party but with a different senator, two were an "Appointee elected" to finish a term and the remainder, (without a note) were not up for election this year.

After these elections, Democrats had 45 seats, independents had 2, and Republicans had 53.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25
Re-elected
D26
Re-elected
D27
Re-elected
D28
Re-elected
D29
Re-elected
D30
Re-elected
D40
Re-elected
D39
Re-elected
D38
Re-elected
D37
Re-elected
D36
Re-elected
D35
Re-elected
D34
Re-elected
D33
Re-elected
D32
Re-elected
D31
Re-elected
D41
Re-elected
D42
Re-elected
D43
Re-elected
D44
Gain
D45
Gain
I1
Re-elected
I2
Re-elected
R53
Gain
R52
Gain
R51
Gain
Majority →
R41 R42 R43 R44
Re-elected
R45
Re-elected
R46
Re-elected
R47
Re-elected
R48
Hold
R49
Hold
R50
Gain
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the special electionsEdit

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24
Appointee elected
D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 I1 I2 R53 R52 R51
Majority →
R41 R42 R43
Appointee elected
R44 R45 R46 R47 R48 R49 R50
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Final pre-election predictionsEdit

Most election predictors used:

  • "Tossup": no advantage
  • "Tilt" (used sometimes): advantage that is not quite as strong as "lean"
  • "Lean": slight advantage
  • "Likely" or "favored": significant, but surmountable advantage (highest ranking given from Fox News)
  • "Safe" or "solid": near-certain chance of victory
State PVI[11] Incumbent Most
recent
result
Cook
Oct 26,
2018
[12]
I.E.
Nov 1,
2018
[13]
Sabato
Nov 5,
2018
[14]
NYT
Nov 5,
2018
[15]
CNN
Nov 2,
2018
[16]
RCP
Nov 5,
2018
[17]
Fox News
Nov 5,
2018
[18]
Daily Kos
Nov 5,
2018
[19]
Politico
Nov 5,
2018
[20]
538[b]
Nov 6,
2018
[21]
Winner
Arizona R+5 Jeff Flake (R)
(retiring)
49% R Tossup Tilt D (flip) Lean D (flip) Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Lean D (flip) 50.0% D (flip)
California D+12 Dianne Feinstein (D) 63% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 53.8% D
Connecticut D+6 Chris Murphy (D) 55% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 58.4% D
Delaware D+6 Tom Carper (D) 66% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 60.0% D
Florida R+2 Bill Nelson (D) 55% D Tossup Tilt D Lean D Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Lean D 50.1% R (flip)
Hawaii D+18 Mazie Hirono (D) 63% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 72.7% D
Indiana R+9 Joe Donnelly (D) 50% D Tossup Tossup Lean R (flip) Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Lean D 52.9% R (flip)
Maine D+3 Angus King (I) 53% I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Likely D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I 54.2% I
Maryland D+12 Ben Cardin (D) 55% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 64.2% D
Massachusetts D+12 Elizabeth Warren (D) 54% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 60.5% D
Michigan D+1 Debbie Stabenow (D) 59% D Likely D Safe D Safe D Likely D Likely D Lean D Likely D Safe D Likely D Safe D 51.8% D
Minnesota D+1 Amy Klobuchar (D) 65% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 60.9% D
Minnesota
(Special)
D+1 Tina Smith (D) 53% D Lean D Likely D Likely D Lean D Likely D Lean D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D 53.6% D
Mississippi R+9 Roger Wicker (R) 57% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R 58.9% R
Mississippi
(Special)[c]
R+9 Cindy Hyde-Smith (R) 60% R Lean R Safe R Likely R Lean R Safe R Likely R Lean R Likely R Likely R Lean R 53.9% R
Missouri R+9 Claire McCaskill (D) 55% D Tossup Tilt R (flip) Lean R (flip) Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup 51.9% R (flip)
Montana R+11 Jon Tester (D) 49% D Tossup Tilt D Lean D Tossup Lean D Tossup Lean D Tossup Lean D Likely D 49.8% D
Nebraska R+14 Deb Fischer (R) 56% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R 58.0% R
Nevada D+1 Dean Heller (R) 46% R Tossup Tilt D (flip) Lean D (flip) Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup Tossup 51.5% D (flip)
New Jersey D+7 Bob Menendez (D) 59% D Tossup Likely D Likely D Tossup Lean D Lean D Lean D Lean D Lean D Likely D 53.1% D
New Mexico D+3 Martin Heinrich (D) 51% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 53.7% D
New York D+11 Kirsten Gillibrand (D) 72% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 66.6% D
North Dakota R+16 Heidi Heitkamp (D) 50% D Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Likely R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) Lean R (flip) 55.4% R (flip)
Ohio R+3 Sherrod Brown (D) 51% D Likely D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D Lean D Likely D Likely D Likely D Safe D 53.2% D
Pennsylvania EVEN Bob Casey Jr. (D) 54% D Likely D Safe D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D Likely D Safe D Likely D Safe D 55.6% D
Rhode Island D+10 Sheldon Whitehouse (D) 64% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 61.5% D
Tennessee R+14 Bob Corker (R)
(retiring)
65% R Tossup Lean R Lean R Tossup Tossup Tossup Lean R Lean R Lean R Likely R 54.4% R
Texas R+8 Ted Cruz (R) 57% R Tossup Likely R Lean R Tossup Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Lean R Likely R 51.1% R
Utah R+20 Orrin Hatch (R)
(retiring)
65% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R 62.5% R
Vermont D+15 Bernie Sanders (I) 71% I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Likely D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I Safe D/I 67.4% I
Virginia D+1 Tim Kaine (D) 53% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 56.9% D
Washington D+7 Maria Cantwell (D) 61% D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Safe D Likely D Safe D Safe D Safe D 58.6% D
West Virginia R+20 Joe Manchin (D) 61% D Lean D Tilt D Lean D Lean D Lean D Tossup Lean D Lean D Lean D Likely D 49.5% D
Wisconsin EVEN Tammy Baldwin (D) 51% D Likely D Safe D Likely D Likely D Likely D Lean D Likely D Likely D Likely D Safe D 54.9% D
Wyoming R+25 John Barrasso (R) 76% R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Safe R Likely R Safe R Safe R Safe R 67.1% R

Election datesEdit

These are the election dates for the regularly scheduled general elections. Shading is added for future events.

State Filing
deadline[22]
Primary
election[23]
Primary
run-off
(if necessary)[23]
General
election
Poll closing
(Eastern Time)[24]
Arizona May 30, 2018 August 28, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
California March 9, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
Connecticut June 12, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Delaware July 10, 2018 September 6, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Florida May 4, 2018 August 28, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm and 8pm
Hawaii June 5, 2018 August 11, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
Indiana February 9, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 6pm and 7pm
Maine March 15, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Maryland February 27, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Massachusetts June 5, 2018 September 4, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Michigan April 24, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm and 9pm
Minnesota June 5, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Mississippi March 1, 2018 June 5, 2018 June 26, 2018 November 6, 2018 8pm
Mississippi (Special) March 26, 2018 November 6, 2018 N/A November 27, 2018[d] 8pm
Missouri March 27, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Montana March 12, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
Nebraska March 1, 2018 May 15, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Nevada March 16, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
New Jersey April 2, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
New Mexico March 13, 2018 June 5, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
New York April 12, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
North Dakota April 9, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm and 11pm
Ohio February 7, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7:30pm
Pennsylvania March 20, 2018 May 15, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Rhode Island June 27, 2018 September 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Tennessee April 5, 2018 August 2, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 8pm
Texas December 11, 2017 March 6, 2018 May 22, 2018
(unnecessary)
November 6, 2018 8pm and 9pm
Utah March 15, 2018 June 26, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 10pm
Vermont May 31, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm
Virginia March 29, 2018 June 12, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7pm
Washington May 18, 2018 August 7, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 11pm
West Virginia January 27, 2018 May 8, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 7:30pm
Wisconsin June 1, 2018 August 14, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm
Wyoming June 1, 2018 August 21, 2018 N/A November 6, 2018 9pm

Race summaryEdit

Special elections during the preceding CongressEdit

In these special elections, the winners will be seated before January 3, 2019, when elected and qualified. They are ordered by election date, then by state and by class.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Minnesota
(Class 2)
Tina Smith Democratic 2018 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected. Tina Smith (Democratic) 53.6%
Karin Housley (Republican) 41.8%
Sarah Wellington (Legal Marijuana Now) 3.7%
Jerry Trooien (independent) 0.9%
Mississippi
(Class 2)
Cindy Hyde-Smith Republican 2018 (Appointed) Interim appointee elected. Cindy Hyde-Smith (Republican) 53.9%[25]
Mike Espy (Democratic) 46.1%[25]

Elections leading to the next CongressEdit

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 2019.

All of the elections involve the Class 1 seats and they are ordered by state.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral
history
Arizona Jeff Flake Republican 2012 Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Kyrsten Sinema (Democratic) 50.0%
Martha McSally (Republican) 47.6%
Angela Green (Green) 2.4%
California Dianne Feinstein Democratic 1992 (Special)
1994
2000
2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Dianne Feinstein (Democratic) 54.2%
Kevin de León (Democratic) 45.8%
Connecticut Chris Murphy Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Chris Murphy (Democratic) 58.4%
Matthew Corey (Republican) 40.5%
Richard Lion (Libertarian) 0.6%
Jeff Russell (Green) 0.5%
Delaware Tom Carper Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Tom Carper (Democratic) 60%
Robert Arlett (Republican) 37.8%
Demitri Theodoropoulos (Green) 1.2%
Nadine Frost (Libertarian) 1.1%
Florida Bill Nelson Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Rick Scott (Republican) 50.1%
Bill Nelson (Democratic) 49.9%
Hawaii Mazie Hirono Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Mazie Hirono (Democratic) 72.7%
Ron Curtis (Republican) 27.3%
Indiana Joe Donnelly Democratic 2012 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Mike Braun (Republican) 51.0%
Joe Donnelly (Democratic) 45.1%
Lucy Brenton (Libertarian) 4.0%
Maine Angus King Independent 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Angus King (Independent) 54.2%
Eric Brakey (Republican) 35.6%
Zak Ringelstein (Democratic) 10.2%
Maryland Ben Cardin Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Ben Cardin (Democratic) 64.2%
Tony Campbell (Republican) 31.1%
Neal Simon (Independent) 3.7%
Arvin Vohra (Libertarian) 1%
Michael Puskar (Independent) (write-in)
Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Elizabeth Warren (Democratic) 60.5%
Geoff Diehl (Republican) 36.2%
Shiva Ayyadurai (Independent) 3.4%
Michigan Debbie Stabenow Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Debbie Stabenow (Democratic) 51.8%
John James (Republican) 46.1%
Marcia Squier (Independent) 1%
George Huffman III (Taxpayers) 0.7
John Wilhelm (Natural Law) 0.4%
Minnesota Amy Klobuchar Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Amy Klobuchar (Democratic) 60.9%
Jim Newberger (Republican) 35.7%
Dennis Schuller (Legal Marijuana Now) 2.5%
Paula M. Overby (Green) 0.9%
Mississippi Roger Wicker Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Roger Wicker (Republican) 58.9%
David Baria (Democratic) 39.1%
Danny Bedwell (Libertarian) 1.4%
Shawn O'Hara (Reform) 0.6%
Missouri Claire McCaskill Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Josh Hawley (Republican) 51.9%
Claire McCaskill (Democratic) 45.1%
Craig O'Dear (independent) 1.4%
Japheth Campbell (Libertarian) 1.2%
Jo Crain (Green) 0.6%
Montana Jon Tester Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Jon Tester (Democratic) 49.8%
Matthew Rosendale (Republican) 47.3%
Rick Breckenridge (Libertarian) 2.9%
Nebraska Deb Fischer Republican 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Deb Fischer (Republican) 58%
Jane Raybould (Democratic) 38.4%
Jim Schultz (Libertarian) 3.6%
Nevada Dean Heller Republican 2011 (Appointed)
2012
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Democratic gain.
Jacky Rosen (Democratic) 51.5%
Dean Heller (Republican) 44.3%
None of these candidates 1.6%
Barry Michaels (independent) 1%
Tim Hagan (Libertarian) 0.9%
Kamau Bakari (Independent American) 0.7%
New Jersey Bob Menendez Democratic 2006 (Appointed)
2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Bob Menendez (Democratic) 53.1%
Bob Hugin (Republican) 43.7%
Madelyn Hoffman (Green) 0.8%
Murray Sabrin (Libertarian) 0.7%
Natalie Rivera (For The People) 0.6%
Tricia Flanagan (New Day NJ) 0.5%
Kevin Kimple (Make It Simple) 0.3%
Hank Schroeder (Economic Growth) 0.3%
New Mexico Martin Heinrich Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Martin Heinrich (Democratic) 53.7%
Mick Rich (Republican) 30.8%
Gary Johnson (Libertarian) 15.4%
New York Kirsten Gillibrand Democratic 2009 (Appointed)
2010 (Special)
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Kirsten Gillibrand (Democratic) 66.6%
Chele Chiavacci Farley (Republican) 33.4%
North Dakota Heidi Heitkamp Democratic 2012 Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator elected.
Republican gain.
Kevin Cramer (Republican) 55.4%
Heidi Heitkamp (Democratic) 44.6%
Ohio Sherrod Brown Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Sherrod Brown (Democratic) 53.2%
Jim Renacci (Republican) 46.8%
Pennsylvania Bob Casey Jr. Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Bob Casey Jr. (Democratic) 55.6%
Lou Barletta (Republican) 42.8%
Dale Kerns (Libertarian) 1%
Neal Gale (Green) 0.6%
Rhode Island Sheldon Whitehouse Democratic 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Sheldon Whitehouse (Democratic) 61.5%
Robert Flanders (Republican) 38.5%
Tennessee Bob Corker Republican 2006
2012
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Marsha Blackburn (Republican) 54.4%
Phil Bredesen (Democratic) 44.2%
Trudy Austin (independent) 0.4%
Dean Hill (independent) 0.4%
Kris Todd (independent) 0.2%
John Carico (independent) 0.2%
Breton Phillips (independent) 0.1%
Kevin McCants (independent) 0.1%
Texas Ted Cruz Republican 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Ted Cruz (Republican) 51.1%
Beto O'Rourke (Democratic) 48.2%
Neal Dikeman (Libertarian) 0.3%
Utah Orrin Hatch Republican 1976
1982
1988
1994
2000
2006
2012
Incumbent retired.
New senator elected.
Republican hold.
Mitt Romney (Republican) 62.5%
Jenny Wilson (Democratic) 31.5%
Tim Aalders (Constitution) 2.7%
Craig Bowden (Libertarian) 2.3%
Reed McCandless (Independent American) 1.1%
Ryan Daniel Jackson (independent) (write-in)
Caleb Dan Reeve (independent) (write-in)
Vermont Bernie Sanders Independent 2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Bernie Sanders (Independent) 67.4%
Lawrence Zupan (Republican) 27.4%
Virginia Tim Kaine Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Tim Kaine (Democratic) 56.9%
Corey Stewart (Republican) 41.2%
Matt Waters (Libertarian) 1.9%
Washington Maria Cantwell Democratic 2000
2006
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Maria Cantwell (Democratic) 58.6%
Susan Hutchison (Republican) 41.4%
West Virginia Joe Manchin Democratic 2010 (Special)
2012
Incumbent re-elected. Joe Manchin (Democratic) 49.5%
Patrick Morrisey (Republican) 46.3%
Rusty Hollen (Libertarian) 4.2%
Wisconsin Tammy Baldwin Democratic 2012 Incumbent re-elected. Tammy Baldwin (Democratic) 54.9%
Leah Vukmir (Republican) 45.1%
Wyoming John Barrasso Republican 2007 (Appointed)
2008 (Special)
2012
Incumbent re-elected. John Barrasso (Republican) 67.1%
Gary Trauner (Democratic) 30.1%
Joe Porambo (Libertarian) 2.8%

Close racesEdit

Red denotes Senate races won by Republicans while Blue denotes those won by Democrats.

States where the margin of victory was under 1%:

  1. Florida, 0.1%

States where the margin of victory was between 1% and 5%:

  1. Arizona, 2.4%
  2. Texas, 2.6%
  3. Montana, 3.1%
  4. West Virginia, 3.2%

States where the margin of victory was between 5% and 10%:

  1. Nevada, 5.0%
  2. Indiana, 5.9%
  3. Missouri, 6.0% - tipping point state
  4. Ohio, 6.4%
  5. Michigan, 6.4%
  6. Mississippi (special), 8.2%
  7. California, 8.3%[e]

ArizonaEdit

Arizona election
 
← 2012
2024 →
       
Nominee Kyrsten Sinema Martha McSally Angela Green
Party Democratic Republican Green
Popular vote 1,191,100 1,135,200 57,442
Percentage 50.0% 47.6% 2.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Jeff Flake
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Kyrsten Sinema
Democratic

One-term Republican Jeff Flake was elected with 49% of the vote in 2012. He chose not to run for reelection.[26]

U.S. Representative Martha McSally[27] won the Republican nomination in a three-way primary on August 28, 2018, against Joe Arpaio and Kelli Ward.

U.S. Representative Kyrsten Sinema[27] easily secured the Democratic nomination.

Sinema defeated McSally by a slim margin; her victory became official only after six days of counting ballots.

CaliforniaEdit

California election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Dianne Feinstein Kevin de León
Party Democratic Democratic
Popular vote 6,009,657 5,082,510
Percentage 54.2% 45.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Dianne Feinstein
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Dianne Feinstein
Democratic

Four-term Democrat Dianne Feinstein won a special election in 1992 and was elected to full terms in 1994, 2000, 2006, and 2012. She ran for re-election and advanced to the general election after securing the top spot in the June 5 jungle primary.[28]

The June 5 primary ballot listed 32 candidates (Feinstein plus 31 challengers) and there were 3 additional write-in candidates. President pro tempore of the California State Senate Kevin de León advanced to the general election after securing the second spot in the primary.[28] Other Democratic candidates included community advocate Adrienne Nicole Edwards,[29] Eugene Patterson Harris,[29] David Hildebrand, Douglas Howard Pierce,[29] and Alison Hartson.[29]

11 Republican candidates ran in the primary, combining for 33.2% of the vote. The top Republican candidate, James P. Bradley, received 8.3% of the vote, which put him in 3rd place at 3.8% behind Kevin DeLeon.[29]

On November 6, Dianne Feinstein was elected to a fifth term, defeating Kevin de León.


ConnecticutEdit

Connecticut election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Chris Murphy Matthew Corey
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 825,478 545,714
Percentage 59.5% 39.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Chris Murphy
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Chris Murphy
Democratic

One-term Democrat Chris Murphy was elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. He ran for re-election.[30]

Businessmen Matthew Corey[31] received the Republican nomination.

Chris Murphy was elected to a second term, winning nearly 60% of the vote.[32]

DelawareEdit

Delaware election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Tom Carper Rob Arlett
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 217,385 137,127
Percentage 60.0% 37.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Tom Carper
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tom Carper
Democratic

Three-term Democrat Tom Carper won re-election with 66% of the vote in 2012. He announced he was running for re-election during an interview on MSNBC on July 24, 2017.[33] He defeated Dover community activist Kerri Evelyn Harris for the Democratic nomination. Sussex County Councilman Robert Arlett won the Republican nomination.[33]

Tom Carper defeated Arlett, winning 60% of the vote.[34]

FloridaEdit

Florida election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Rick Scott Bill Nelson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 4,099,505 4,089,472
Percentage 50.05% 49.93%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Bill Nelson
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Rick Scott
Republican

Three-term Democrat Bill Nelson was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. He sought re-election to a fourth term in office.[35]

Florida Governor Rick Scott won the Republican nomination. First elected in 2010 and re-elected in 2014, Scott's term as Governor of Florida is set to end by January 2019, due to term limits.[35]

Edward Janowski was running as an independent, but did not qualify.[35]

Scott led among ballots tallied on election night, but given the close margins of the race recounts were ordered.[36] Final recount numbers were released following a machine and hand recount with Rick Scott maintaining a lead.[37] On November 18, Nelson conceded to Scott.[38] Two days later, election results were certified by the state, cementing Scott's win.[39]

HawaiiEdit

Hawaii election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Mazie Hirono Ron Curtis
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 276,316 112,035
Percentage 71.2% 28.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Mazie Hirono
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Mazie Hirono
Democratic

One-term Democrat Mazie Hirono was elected with 63% of the vote in 2012. She ran.[40]

Ron Curtis was the Republican nominee.

Hirono was elected to a second term.

IndianaEdit

Indiana election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Mike Braun Joe Donnelly
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,156,914 1,022,635
Percentage 51.0% 45.1%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Joe Donnelly
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Mike Braun
Republican

One-term Democrat Joe Donnelly was elected with 50.04% of the vote in 2012. He ran. He won the Democratic primary unopposed.[41]

State Representative Mike Braun[41] won the May 8 Republican primary. U.S. Representatives Luke Messer[42] and Todd Rokita[42] also ran for the Republican nomination.

James Johnson ran as an independent.[41]

Braun won election with 51% of the vote, defeating Joe Donnelly.[43]

MaineEdit

Maine election
 
← 2012
2024 →
       
Nominee Angus King Eric Brakey Zak Ringelstein
Party Independent Republican Democratic
Popular vote 341,250 221,799 64,652
Percentage 54.4% 35.3% 10.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Angus King
Independent

Elected U.S. Senator

Angus King
Independent

One-term Independent Senator Angus King was elected in a three-way race with 53% of the vote in 2012. King has caucused with the Democratic Party since taking office in 2013, but he has left open the possibility of caucusing with the Republican Party in the future.[44]

King ran.[45]

State Senator Eric Brakey ran unopposed for the Republican nomination.[45]

Public school teacher and founder of UClass Zak Ringelstein ran unopposed for the Democratic nomination.[45]

The election was conducted with ranked choice voting, as opposed to "First-past-the-post voting", after Maine voters passed a citizen referendum approving the change in 2016[46] and a June 2018 referendum sustaining the change.[47]

King was easily re-elected with over 50% of the vote.

MarylandEdit

Maryland election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Ben Cardin Tony Campbell
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,491,704 697,107
Percentage 64.8% 30.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Ben Cardin
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Ben Cardin
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Ben Cardin was re-elected with 56% of the vote in 2012. He won the Democratic primary.[48]

Tony Campbell, Evan Cronhardt, Nnabu Eze, Gerald Smith, and Blaine Taylor[49] were seeking the Republican nomination, With Campbell winning.

Arvin Vohra, vice chairman of the Libertarian National Committee, sought the Libertarian Party nomination.[49]

Independents Neal Simon[50] and Edward Shlikas[51] are running.

Cardin won re-election to a third term in office.[52]

MassachusettsEdit

Massachusetts election
 
← 2012
2024 →
       
Nominee Elizabeth Warren Geoff Diehl Shiva Ayyadurai
Party Democratic Republican Independent
Popular vote 1,633,371 979,210 91,710
Percentage 60.3% 36.2% 3.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Elizabeth Warren
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Elizabeth Warren
Democratic

One-term Democrat Elizabeth Warren was elected with 54% of the vote in 2012. She ran for re-election.[53]

State Representative Geoff Diehl,[54] attorney and founder of Better for America, John Kingston,[54] former Romney aide Beth Lindstrom,[54] ran for the Republican nomination. Diehl won the Republican nomination.

Shiva Ayyadurai[55] is ran as an independent. Shiva started as in early 2017 as the first Republican in the race, but went independent in November 2017.

Warren defeated Diehl winning a second term.[56]

MichiganEdit

Michigan election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Debbie Stabenow John James
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,214,478 1,938,818
Percentage 52.3% 45.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Debbie Stabenow
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Debbie Stabenow
Democratic

Three-term Democrat Debbie Stabenow was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2012.[57] She was renominated without Democratic opposition. On the Republican side, businessman John James won the nomination.[57]

In the final months of the election, polls showed the race was beginning to narrow. Ultimately, Stabenow was re-elected, defeating James.

MinnesotaEdit

Minnesota election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Amy Klobuchar Jim Newberger
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,566,158 940,427
Percentage 60.3% 36.2%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Amy Klobuchar
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Amy Klobuchar
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Amy Klobuchar was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. She ran for re-election.[58]

State Representative Jim Newberger[58] ran for the Republican nomination.

Klobuchar was easily re-elected.[59]

Minnesota (Special)Edit

Minnesota special election
 
← 2014
2020 →
     
Nominee Tina Smith Karin Housley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,370,524 1,095,772
Percentage 53.0% 42.5%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Tina Smith
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tina Smith
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Al Franken announced that he would resign in December 2017, following allegations of sexual harassment. Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota, appointed Lt. Gov. Tina Smith on January 2, 2018, as an interim Senator until the November 2018 election. She defeated primary challenger Richard Painter in the Democratic primary held on August 14.

Incumbent Tina Smith defeated Republican Karin Housley in the general election for a full term ending January 3, 2021.

MississippiEdit

Mississippi election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Roger Wicker David Baria
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 517,475 344,225
Percentage 58.8% 39.1%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Roger Wicker
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Roger Wicker
Republican

One-term Republican Roger Wicker won re-election with 57% of the vote in 2012. He was appointed in 2007 and won a special election in 2008 to serve the remainder of Trent Lott's term. He ran.[25]

David Baria[25] won the Democratic nomination in a run-off on June 26.

Wicker easily was re-elected.[60]

Mississippi (Special)Edit

Mississippi special election
 
← 2014 November 6, 2018 / November 27, 2018 2020 →
     
Nominee Cindy Hyde-Smith Mike Espy
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 479,278 410,693
Percentage 53.9% 46.1%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Cindy Hyde-Smith
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Cindy Hyde-Smith
Republican

Seven-term Republican Thad Cochran, who won re-election with 59.9% of the vote in 2014, announced that he would resign since April 1, 2018 due to health reasons.[61] Phil Bryant, Governor of Mississippi, announced on March 21, 2018, that he would appoint Mississippi Agriculture Commissioner Cindy Hyde-Smith to fill the vacancy.[62] She ran in the special election.[25]

On November 6, a nonpartisan jungle primary took place on the same day as the regularly scheduled U.S. Senate election for the seat currently held by Roger Wicker. Party affiliations were not printed on the ballot.[63] As no candidate gained 50% of the votes, a runoff special election between the top two candidates - Hyde-Smith and former United States Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy[25] - was held on November 27, 2018. Hyde-Smith won the runoff election.

Democrat Tobey Bartee[64] and Republican Chris McDaniel also contested the first round of the election.[25]

MissouriEdit

Missouri election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Josh Hawley Claire McCaskill
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,249,927 1,112,935
Percentage 51.4% 45.6%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Claire McCaskill
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Josh Hawley
Republican

Two-term Democrat Claire McCaskill was re-elected with 55% of the vote in 2012. She was renominated.[65]

Attorney General Josh Hawley[65] won the Republican nomination.[citation needed] Japheth Campbell has declared his candidacy for the Libertarian nomination.[65]

Polls showed the race was close for months leading up to the election. Hawley defeated McCaskill in the general election.[66]

MontanaEdit

Montana election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Jon Tester Matt Rosendale
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 253,871 235,960
Percentage 50.3% 46.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Jon Tester
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Jon Tester
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Jon Tester was re-elected with 49% of the vote in 2012. He won the Democratic nomination in the June 5 primary with no opposition.[67]

State Auditor Matthew Rosendale[67] won the Republican nomination in the June 5 primary. State Senator Albert Olszewski,[67] former judge Russell Fagg,[67] and Troy Downing[67] also ran for the Republican nomination.

Tester was re-elected winning over 50% of the vote.[68]

NebraskaEdit

Nebraska election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Deb Fischer Jane Raybould
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 398,916 264,488
Percentage 58.0% 38.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Deb Fischer
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Deb Fischer
Republican

One-term Republican Deb Fischer was elected with 58% of the vote in 2012. She ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 15 primary.[69] Other Republicans who ran include retired professor Jack Heidel, Todd Watson, and Dennis Frank Macek.[70]

Lincoln Councilwoman Jane Raybould ran for and won the Democratic nomination in the May 15 primary.[69] Other Democrats who ran include Frank Svoboda, Chris Janicek, and Larry Marvin, who was a candidate in 2008, 2012, and 2014.[70]

Jim Schultz ran for the Libertarian nomination.[69]

Fischer was easily re-elected.[71]

NevadaEdit

Nevada election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Jacky Rosen Dean Heller
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 489,982 441,166
Percentage 50.4% 45.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Dean Heller
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Jacky Rosen
Democratic

Incumbent Republican Dean Heller was the Republican nominee.[72] He was appointed to the seat in 2011 and then elected with 46% of the vote in 2012. Heller considered running for governor, but chose to seek re-election.[73]

Nevada was the only state in the midterm elections that had an incumbent Republican Senator in a state that Hillary Clinton had won in 2016.

Representative Jacky Rosen[73] is the Democratic nominee.[72]

Rosen deated Heller in the general election, making Heller the only Republican incumbent to lose re-election in 2018.[74]

New JerseyEdit

New Jersey election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Bob Menendez Bob Hugin
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,630,678 1,309,832
Percentage 53.7% 43.1%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Menendez
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Menendez
Democratic

Republican Bob Hugin[75] was nominated to face two-term Democrat Bob Menendez, who was re-elected with 59% of the vote in 2012. Menendez was originally appointed to the seat in January 2006. He ran for re-election, despite recent scandals that plagued his campaign.[75]

Hugin self-funded most of his campaign and created a close election in a typically Democratic state.

Ultimately, Menendez was re-elected with nearly 54% of the vote.[76]

New MexicoEdit

New Mexico election
 
← 2012
2024 →
       
Nominee Martin Heinrich Mick Rich Gary Johnson
Party Democratic Republican Libertarian
Popular vote 376,998 212,813 107,201
Percentage 54.1% 30.5% 15.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Martin Heinrich
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Martin Heinrich
Democratic

One-term Democrat Martin Heinrich was elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. He ran.[77] Mick Rich won the Republican nomination unopposed.[77]

Aubrey Dunn Jr., New Mexico Commissioner of Public Lands and otherwise the first Libertarian to ever hold statewide elected office in history, announced his run for the seat,[77] but stepped aside in August to allow former Governor of New Mexico, Gary Johnson's candidacy.

Heinrich was re-elected, defeating Rich and Johnson.

New YorkEdit

New York election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Kirsten Gillibrand Chele Chiavacci Farley
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 3,733,194 1,882,984
Percentage 66.4% 33.5%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Kirsten Gillibrand
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Kirsten Gillibrand
Democratic

One-term Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand was elected with 72% of the vote in 2012. She had previously been appointed to the seat in 2009 and won a special election to remain in office in 2010. She is running.[78]

Private equity executive Chele Chiavacci Farley has been nominated for U.S. Senate by the Republican and Conservative Parties.[78]

Gillibrand was elected to a second term.[79]

North DakotaEdit

North Dakota election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Kevin Cramer Heidi Heitkamp
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 179,720 144,376
Percentage 55.1% 44.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Heidi Heitkamp
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Kevin Cramer
Republican

One-term Democrat Heidi Heitkamp was elected with 50% of the vote in 2012. She won the Democratic nomination unopposed.[80]

Representative Kevin Cramer[80] won the Republican nomination in the June 12 primary. Former Niagara, North Dakota Mayor Thomas O'Neill[80] also ran for the Republican nomination.

Heitkamp was continuously behind in the polls leading up to the election, and ended up losing to Cramer by 11%.[81]

OhioEdit

Ohio election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Sherrod Brown Jim Renacci
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,286,730 2,011,832
Percentage 53.2% 46.8%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Sherrod Brown
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Sherrod Brown
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Sherrod Brown was re-elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. He is running and was unopposed in Democratic primary.[82]

U.S. Representative Jim Renacci ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 8 primary.[82] Other Republicans who ran include investment banker Michael Gibbons,[82] businesswoman Melissa Ackison,[82] Dan Kiley,[82] and Don Elijah Eckhart.[82]

Brown won re-election, defeating Renacci. Brown was the only non-judicial statewide Democrat in Ohio to win in 2018.[83]

PennsylvaniaEdit

Pennsylvania election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Bob Casey Jr. Lou Barletta
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 2,792,327 2,134,775
Percentage 55.7% 42.6%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Casey Jr.
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Bob Casey Jr.
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Bob Casey Jr. was re-elected with 54% of the vote in 2012. He ran and won the Democratic primary unopposed.[84]

U.S. Representative Lou Barletta ran for and won the Republican nomination in the May 15 primary.[84] Jim Christiana also ran for the Republican nomination.[84]

Casey was easily re-elected.[85]

Rhode IslandEdit

Rhode Island election
 
← 2012
2024 →
   
Nominee Sheldon Whitehouse Robert Flanders
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 231,477 144,421
Percentage 61.4% 38.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Sheldon Whitehouse
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Sheldon Whitehouse
Democratic

Two-term Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse was re-elected with 64% of the vote in 2012. He ran.[86]

Former Rhode Island Supreme Court Associate Justice Robert Flanders[86] was the Republican nominee.

Whitehouse was elected to a third term.

TennesseeEdit

Tennessee election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Marsha Blackburn Phil Bredesen
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 1,225,568 982,685
Percentage 54.7% 43.9%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Bob Corker
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Marsha Blackburn
Republican

Two-term Republican Bob Corker was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. Senator Corker filed his Statement of Candidacy with the Secretary of the U.S. Senate to run for re-election,[87] but on September 26, 2017, Senator Corker announced his intent to retire.[88]

Aaron Pettigrew[89] and Republican U.S. Representative Marsha Blackburn[89] ran for the Republican nomination. Marsha Blackburn became the Republican nominee.

Former Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen[89] became the Democratic nominee.

Despite predictions that race would be close, Blackburn was easily elected to the Senate.[90]

TexasEdit

Texas election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Ted Cruz Beto O'Rourke
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 4,244,204 4,024,777
Percentage 50.9% 48.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Ted Cruz
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Ted Cruz
Republican

One-term Republican Ted Cruz was elected with 57% of the vote in 2012. He overwhelmingly won the Republican primary on March 6, 2018.[91] Television producer Bruce Jacobson,[92] Houston energy attorney Stefano de Stefano,[93] former mayor of La Marque Geraldine Sam,[94] Mary Miller,[95] and Thomas Dillingham[96] were Cruz's opponents.

U.S. Representative Beto O'Rourke won the Democratic nomination on March 6, 2018.[91] Other Democrats who ran include Irasema Ramirez Hernandez[97] and Edward Kimbrough.[98]

Nurse Carl Bible ran as an independent.[99] Bob McNeil ran as the candidate of the American Citizen Party.[100]

O'Rouke ran a strong campaign, creating a close race in a traditionally Republican stronghold.[101] Nevertheless, Cruz was narrowly re-elected to a second term.[102]

UtahEdit

Utah election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Mitt Romney Jenny Wilson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 665,215 328,541
Percentage 62.6% 30.9%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Orrin Hatch
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Mitt Romney
Republican

Seven-term Republican Orrin Hatch was re-elected with 65% of the vote in 2012. Hatch is the President pro tempore of the United States Senate, as well as the second most-senior Senator. Before the 2012 election, Hatch said that he would retire at the end of his seventh term if he was re-elected.[103] Hatch initially announced his re-election campaign on March 9, 2017,[104][105] but later announced his plans to retire on January 2, 2018. Former 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was running for the seat.[106]

Professor James Singer was running for the Democratic nomination, but he dropped out and endorsed Salt Lake County Councilwoman Jenny Wilson, who made her Senate bid official on July 17, 2017.[107][108] Danny Drew[109][110] also was running, but dropped out and endorsed Jenny Wilson. Mitchell Kent Vice was defeated for the Democratic nomination by Wilson.

Mitt Romney was easily elected, defeating Wilson.[111]

VermontEdit

Vermont election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Bernie Sanders Lawrence Zupan
Party Independent Republican
Popular vote 183,416 74,635
Percentage 67.4% 27.4%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Bernie Sanders
Independent

Elected U.S. Senator

Bernie Sanders
Independent

Two-term Independent Senator Bernie Sanders was re-elected with 71% of the vote in 2012. Sanders, one of two independent members of Congress, has caucused with the Democratic Party since taking office in 2007. In November 2015, Sanders announced his plans to run as a Democrat, rather than an Independent, in all future elections. He won the nomination easily.[112]

Sanders easily won election to a third term.[113]

VirginiaEdit

Virginia election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Tim Kaine Corey Stewart
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,910,370 1,374,313
Percentage 57.0% 41.0%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Tim Kaine
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tim Kaine
Democratic

One-term Democrat Tim Kaine was elected with 53% of the vote in 2012. He was re-nominated unopposed.[114] Prince William County Supervisor Corey Stewart[114] was the Republican nominee. Matt Waters was the Libertarian nominee.[115] Kaine defeated Stewart with 57% of the vote. Stewart received about 41% of the vote.[116]

WashingtonEdit

Washington election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Maria Cantwell Susan Hutchison
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,798,211 1,278,703
Percentage 58.4% 41.6%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Maria Cantwell
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Maria Cantwell
Democratic

Three-term Democrat Maria Cantwell was re-elected with 61% of the vote in 2012. She is running.[117]

Washington holds non-partisan blanket primaries, in which the top two finishers advance to the general election regardless of party. Cantwell and former state Republican Party chair Susan Hutchison faced each other in November.

Cantwell won re-election by a large margin.[118]

West VirginiaEdit

West Virginia election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Joe Manchin Patrick Morrisey
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 290,505 271,112
Percentage 49.6% 46.3%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Joe Manchin
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Joe Manchin
Democratic

One-term Democrat Joe Manchin was elected with 61% of the vote in 2012. He originally won the seat in a 2010 special election. Manchin ran for re-election and won the May 8 Democratic primary.[119] Environmental activist Paula Jean Swearengin,[119] also ran for the Democratic nomination.

West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey received the Republican nomination in the May 8 primary. Representative Evan Jenkins,[119] coal miner Bo Copley,[119] Jack Newbrough, Don Blankenship, and Tom Willis ran for the Republican nomination.[119]

Despite recent Republican successes in West Virginia, Manchin was able to win re-election to a second term.[120]

WisconsinEdit

Wisconsin election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee Tammy Baldwin Leah Vukmir
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 1,471,904 1,183,061
Percentage 55.4% 44.6%

 

U.S. Senator before election

Tammy Baldwin
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Tammy Baldwin
Democratic

One-term Democrat Tammy Baldwin was elected with 51% of the vote in 2012. She ran.[121]

State Senator Leah Vukmir[121] and businessman and member of Wisconsin Board of Veterans Affairs Kevin Nicholson[121] ran for the Republican nomination, with Vukmir proceeding to the general election.

Baldwin was re-elected with over 55% of the vote.[122]

WyomingEdit

Wyoming Election
 
← 2012
2024 →
     
Nominee John Barrasso Gary Trauner
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 136,210 61,227
Percentage 67.0% 30.1%

 

U.S. Senator before election

John Barrasso
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

John Barrasso
Republican

One-term Republican John Barrasso was elected with 76% of the vote in 2012. Barrasso was appointed to the seat in 2007 and won a special election in 2008. He ran.[123]

Gary Trauner,[123] a Jackson Hole businessman and U.S. House candidate in 2006 and 2008, was the Democratic nominee.

Barrasso was easily elected to a second term, defeating Trauner.[124]

National resultsEdit

Below is a map of the total results of the Senate races across the country.

 
  • The special election in Minnesota is not included, but final results are found on the appropriate page.
  • The special election in Mississippi is not included, but final results are found on the appropriate page.
  • Florida's and Arizona's results are not yet certified.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b The nation-wide popular vote count is skewed towards the Democrats because in California, both general election candidates were Democrats. This happened because two Democrats won the nonpartisan blanket primary system which was established in 2010 with the passage of Proposition 14. Therefore, all 11.1 million U.S. Senate votes cast there were for Democrats.[1]
    For comparison, 12.5 million votes were cast in the gubernatorial elections held concurrently with the Senate elections. The Republican gubernatorial candidate received 4.7 million votes, or 38% of the vote cast. The 1.4 million additional votes cast in the gubernatorial race (12.5 million vs. 11.1 million) has been statistically attributed to Republican voters who did not want to cast a vote in the Senate race featuring only Democrats.[2]
  2. ^ Reflects the classic version of the forecast model.
  3. ^ Special elections in Mississippi are nonpartisan, therefore party affiliation is not listed on the ballot.
  4. ^ Mississippi held a run-off for the special election on November 27, 2018 because no candidate won a majority of the vote in the November 6, 2018 jungle primary.
  5. ^ Under California's jungle primary' system, all Republican candidates were eliminated and therefore the general election was between two Democrats.

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