1979 Spanish general election

The 1979 Spanish general election was held on Thursday, 1 March 1979, to elect the 1st Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as all 208 seats in the Senate.

1979 Spanish general election

← 1977 1 March 1979 1982 →

All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies and all 208 seats in the Senate
176 seats needed for a majority in the Congress of Deputies
Opinion polls
Registered26,836,490 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg13.8%
Turnout18,259,192 (68.0%)
Red Arrow Down.svg10.8 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Adolfo Suárez 1979 (cropped).jpg Felipe González 1976 (cropped).jpg Santiago Carrillo 1978 (cropped).jpg
Leader Adolfo Suárez Felipe González Santiago Carrillo
Party UCD PSOE PCE
Leader since 3 May 1977 13 October 1974 3 July 1960
Leader's seat Madrid Madrid Madrid
Last election 165 seats, 34.4% 124 seats, 33.8%[a] 20 seats, 9.3%
Seats won 168 121 23
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3 Red Arrow Down.svg3 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3
Popular vote 6,268,593 5,469,813 1,938,487
Percentage 34.8% 30.4% 10.8%
Swing Green Arrow Up Darker.svg0.4 pp Red Arrow Down.svg3.4 pp Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.5 pp

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Manuel Fraga 1982 (cropped).jpg Jordi Pujol 1978 (cropped).jpg Xabier Arzalluz (cropped).jpg
Leader Manuel Fraga Jordi Pujol Xabier Arzalluz
Party CD CiU EAJ/PNV
Leader since 9 October 1976 17 November 1974 1977
Leader's seat Madrid Barcelona Guipúzcoa
Last election 16 seats, 8.4%[b] 13 seats, 3.8%[c] 8 seats, 1.6%
Seats won 9 8 7
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg7 Red Arrow Down.svg5 Red Arrow Down.svg1
Popular vote 1,094,438 483,353 296,597
Percentage 6.1% 2.7% 1.6%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg2.3 pp Red Arrow Down.svg1.1 pp Arrow Blue Right 001.svg0.0 pp

1979 Spanish election - Results.svg
1979 Spanish election - AC results.svg

Prime Minister before election

Adolfo Suárez
UCD

Elected Prime Minister

Adolfo Suárez
UCD

This was the first election held under the Spanish Constitution of 1978. The Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) remained the largest party, winning 168 of the 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies and 119 of the 208 seats in the Senate. As a result, Adolfo Suárez went on to form a minority government, depending on support from Manuel Fraga's Democratic Coalition, which experienced an electoral decline.

OverviewEdit

Electoral systemEdit

The Spanish Cortes Generales were envisaged as an imperfect bicameral system. The Congress of Deputies had greater legislative power than the Senate, having the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a Prime Minister and to override Senate vetoes by an absolute majority of votes. Nonetheless, the Senate possessed a few exclusive, yet limited in number functions—such as its role in constitutional amendment—which were not subject to the Congress' override.[1][2] Voting for the Cortes Generales was on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprised all nationals over eighteen and in full enjoyment of their political rights.[3]

For the Congress of Deputies, 348 seats were elected using the D'Hondt method and a closed list proportional representation, with an electoral threshold of three percent of valid votes—which included blank ballots—being applied in each constituency. Additionally, the use of the D'Hondt method might result in an effective threshold over three percent, depending on the district magnitude.[4] Seats were allocated to constituencies, corresponding to the provinces of Spain. Each constituency was entitled to an initial minimum of two seats, with the remaining 248 fixed among the constituencies in proportion to their populations, at a rate of approximately one seat per each 144,500 inhabitants or fraction greater than 70,000. Ceuta and Melilla were allocated the two remaining seats, which were elected using plurality voting.[1][5][6]

For the Senate, 208 seats were elected using an open list partial block voting, with electors voting for individual candidates instead of parties. In constituencies electing four seats, electors could vote for up to three candidates; in those with two or three seats, for up to two candidates; and for one candidate in single-member districts. Each of the 47 peninsular provinces was allocated four seats, whereas for insular provinces, such as the Balearic and Canary Islands, districts were the islands themselves, with the larger—Majorca, Gran Canaria and Tenerife—being allocated three seats each, and the smaller—Menorca, IbizaFormentera, Fuerteventura, La Gomera, El Hierro, Lanzarote and La Palma—one each. Ceuta and Melilla elected two seats each. The law also provided for by-elections to fill seats vacated up to two years into the legislature. Additionally, autonomous communities could appoint at least one senator each and were entitled to one additional senator per each million inhabitants.[1][5][6]

The electoral law provided that parties, federations, coalitions and groupings of electors were allowed to present lists of candidates. However, groupings of electors were required to secure the signature of at least 0.1 percent of the electors registered in the constituency for which they sought election—needing to secure, in any case, the signature of 500 electors—. Electors were barred from signing for more than one list of candidates. Concurrently, parties and federations intending to enter in coalition to take part jointly at an election were required to inform the relevant Electoral Commission within fifteen days of the election being called.[5]

Election dateEdit

The term of the Cortes elected in the 1977 election was not to be continued beyond 15 June 1981 in the event they were not dissolved earlier. An election was required to be held within from thirty to sixty days after the date of expiry of the Cortes Generales, setting the latest possible election date for the Cortes Generales on Friday, 14 August 1981.

The Prime Minister had the prerogative to dissolve both Houses at any given time—either jointly or separately—and call a snap election, provided that no motion of no confidence was in process, no state of emergency was in force and that dissolution did not occur before one year had elapsed since the previous one. Additionally, both Houses were to be dissolved and a new election called if an investiture process failed to elect a Prime Minister within a two-month period from the first ballot.[1][6]

Parties and leadersEdit

Below is a list of the main parties and coalitions which contested the election:

Parties and coalitions Ideology Candidate
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) Centrism Adolfo Suárez
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) Democratic socialism, Marxism Felipe González
Communist Party of Spain (PCE) Eurocommunism Santiago Carrillo
Democratic Coalition (CD) Conservatism Manuel Fraga
Convergence and Union (CiU) Centrism, Catalan autonomism Jordi Pujol
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) Christian democracy, Basque autonomism Xabier Arzalluz
Republican Left of CataloniaNational Front (ERC–FNC) Left-wing nationalism, Catalan regionalism Heribert Barrera
National Union (UN) Fascism, National Catholicism Blas Piñar
Basque Country Left (EE) Socialism, Basque nationalism Juan María Bandrés
Regionalist Aragonese Party (PAR) Centrism, Aragonese regionalism Hipólito Gómez de las Roces
Popular Unity (HB) Abertzale left, Basque independentism Francisco Letamendia
Socialist Party of Andalusia–Andalusian Party (PSA–PA) Social democracy, Andalusian nationalism Alejandro Rojas-Marcos
Canarian People's Union (UPC) Socialism, Canarian nationalism Fernando Sagaseta
Navarrese People's Union (UPN) Conservatism, Navarrese regionalism Jesús Aizpún

Opinion pollsEdit

Voting intention estimatesEdit

The table below lists voting intention estimates in reverse chronological order, showing the most recent first and using the dates when the survey fieldwork was done, as opposed to the date of publication. Where the fieldwork dates are unknown, the date of publication is given instead. The highest percentage figure in each polling survey is displayed with its background shaded in the leading party's colour. If a tie ensues, this is applied to the figures with the highest percentages. The "Lead" column on the right shows the percentage-point difference between the parties with the highest percentages in a given poll. When available, seat projections are also displayed below the voting estimates in a smaller font. 176 seats were required for an absolute majority in the Congress of Deputies.

Color key:

  Exit poll

Voting preferencesEdit

The table below lists raw, unweighted voting preferences.

ResultsEdit

Congress of DeputiesEdit

Summary of the 1 March 1979 Congress of Deputies election results
Parties and coalitions Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Total +/−
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) 6,268,593 34.84 +0.40 168 +3
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)1 5,469,813 30.40 –3.44 121 –3
Communist Party of Spain (PCE) 1,938,487 10.77 +1.44 23 +3
Democratic Coalition (CD) 1,094,438 6.08 –2.33 9 –7
Democratic Coalition (CD)2 1,060,330 5.89 –2.05 9 –6
Foral Union of the Basque Country (UFPV)3 34,108 0.19 –0.29 0 –1
Convergence and Union (CiU)4 483,353 2.69 –1.06 8 –5
National Union (UN)5 378,964 2.11 +1.54 1 +1
Socialist Party of Andalusia–Andalusian Party (PSA–PA) 325,842 1.81 New 5 +5
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 296,597 1.65 +0.03 7 –1
Party of Labour of Spain (PTE)6 192,798 1.07 +0.40 0 ±0
Popular Unity (HB)7 172,110 0.96 +0.72 3 +3
Workers' Revolutionary Organization (ORT) 138,487 0.77 +0.22 0 ±0
Workers' Revolutionary Organization (ORT)8 127,517 0.71 +0.29 0 ±0
Navarrese Left Union (UNAI) 10,970 0.06 –0.07 0 ±0
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (historical) (PSOEh)9 133,869 0.74 +0.05 0 ±0
Republican Left of CataloniaNational Front of Catalonia (ERC–FNC)10 123,452 0.69 –0.10 1 ±0
Basque Country Left (EE) 85,677 0.48 +0.14 1 ±0
Communist MovementOrganization of Communist Left (MC–OIC) 84,856 0.47 +0.28 0 ±0
Galician National-Popular Bloc (BNPG) 60,889 0.34 +0.22 0 ±0
Canarian People's Union (UPC) 58,953 0.33 New 1 +1
Left Bloc for National Liberation (BEAN) 56,582 0.31 New 0 ±0
Galician Unity (PGPOGPSG)11 55,555 0.31 +0.16 0 ±0
Republican Left (IR) 55,384 0.31 New 0 ±0
Carlist Party (PC) 50,552 0.28 +0.23 0 ±0
Communist OrganizationCommunist Unification (OCEBR–UCE) 47,937 0.27 New 0 ±0
Workers' Communist Party (PCT) 47,896 0.27 New 0 ±0
Regionalist Aragonese Party (PAR)12 38,042 0.21 +0.01 1 ±0
Revolutionary Communist League (LCR)13 36,662 0.20 –0.02 0 ±0
Spanish Phalanx of the CNSO (Authentic) (FE–JONS(A)) 30,252 0.17 –0.08 0 ±0
Navarrese People's Union (UPN) 28,248 0.16 New 1 +1
Coalition for Aragon (PSAr–PSDA) 19,220 0.11 New 0 ±0
Nationalist Party of Castile and León (PANCAL) 16,016 0.09 New 0 ±0
Liberal Party (PL) 15,774 0.09 New 0 ±0
Valencian Regional Union (URV) 15,694 0.09 New 0 ±0
Nationalist Party of the Valencian Country (PNPV) 13,828 0.08 New 0 ±0
Spanish Ruralist Party (PRE) 10,324 0.06 New 0 ±0
Party of the Canarian Country (PPC) 10,099 0.06 New 0 ±0
Socialists of Majorca and Menorca (SMiM) 10,022 0.06 New 0 ±0
Syndicalist Party (PSIN) 9,777 0.05 New 0 ±0
Union for the Freedom of Speech (ULE) 7,126 0.04 New 0 ±0
Catalan State (EC) 6,328 0.04 New 0 ±0
Cantonal Party (PCAN) 6,290 0.03 New 0 ±0
Independent Candidacy of the Countryside (CIC) 6,115 0.03 New 0 ±0
Social Christian Democracy of Catalonia (DSCC) 4,976 0.03 –0.02 0 ±0
Proverist Party (PPr) 4,939 0.03 ±0.00 0 ±0
Spanish Democratic Republican Action (ARDE) 4,826 0.03 New 0 ±0
Communist League (LC) 3,614 0.02 New 0 ±0
Asturian Nationalist Council (CNA) 3,049 0.02 New 0 ±0
Authentic Spanish Phalanx (FEA) 2,736 0.02 New 0 ±0
Pro-Austerity Policy Political Party (PIPPA) 2,409 0.01 New 0 ±0
Workers and Peasants Party (POC) 2,314 0.01 New 0 ±0
Independent Candidates of Melilla (CIME) 1,820 0.01 New 0 ±0
Falangist Unity–Independent Spanish Phalanx (UF–FI–AT) 1,188 0.01 New 0 ±0
Spanish Phalanx–Falangist Unity (FE–UF) 876 0.00 New 0 ±0
Centre Independent Candidacy (INDEP) n/a n/a –0.16 0 –1
Blank ballots 57,267 0.32 +0.07
Total 17,990,915 350 ±0
Valid votes 17,990,915 98.53 –0.04
Invalid votes 268,277 1.47 +0.04
Votes cast / turnout 18,259,192 68.04 –10.79
Abstentions 8,577,298 31.96 +10.79
Registered voters 26,836,490
Sources[11][12]
Popular vote
UCD
34.84%
PSOE
30.40%
PCE
10.77%
CD
6.08%
CiU
2.69%
UN
2.11%
PSA–PA
1.81%
EAJ/PNV
1.65%
PTE
1.07%
HB
0.96%
ERCFNC
0.69%
EE
0.48%
UPC
0.33%
PAR
0.21%
UPN
0.16%
Others
5.43%
Blank ballots
0.32%
Seats
UCD
48.00%
PSOE
34.57%
PCE
6.57%
CD
2.57%
CiU
2.29%
EAJ/PNV
2.00%
PSA–PA
1.43%
HB
0.86%
UN
0.29%
ERCFNC
0.29%
EE
0.29%
UPC
0.29%
PAR
0.29%
UPN
0.29%

SenateEdit

Summary of the 1 March 1979 Senate of Spain election results
Parties and coalitions Directly
elected
Reg.
app.
Total
Seats +/−
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) 118 +12 0 118
Union of the Democratic Centre (UCD) 117 +11 0 117
Union of the Centre of Catalonia (UCC) 1 +1 0 1
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE)1 61 +8 0 61
New Agreement (PSCERC) 10 +2 0 10
Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC)2 8 +1 0 8
Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) 2 +1 0 2
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 8 +2 0 8
Democratic Coalition (CD) 3 +1 0 3
People's Alliance (AP) 3 +1 0 3
Liberal Citizens Action (ACL) 0 ±0 0 0
Progressive Democratic Party (PDProg) 0 ±0 0 0
Group of Independent Electors (ADEI)3 3 –1 0 3
For the Agreement (PSUCPTC) 1 –3 0 1
Unified Socialist Party of Catalonia (PSUC) 1 –3 0 1
Party of Labour of Catalonia (PTC) 0 ±0 0 0
Convergence and Union (CiU) 1 –1 0 1
Democratic Convergence of Catalonia (CDC) 1 –1 0 1
Democratic Union of Catalonia (UDC) 0 ±0 0 0
Popular Unity (HB) 1 +1 0 1
Menorcan Progressive Candidacy (PSMPSOEPCIBPTI) 1 +1 0 1
Independents (INDEP) 1 +1 0 1
Independent Progressives and Socialists (PSI) 0 –6 0 0
Democratic Left (ID) 0 –5 0 0
Aragonese Candidacy of Democratic Unity (CAUD) 0 –2 0 0
Galician Democratic Candidacy (CDG) 0 –2 0 0
Communist Party of Spain (PCE) 0 –1 0 0
Liberal Alliance (AL) 0 –1 0 0
Xirinacs Electoral Group (AE Xirinacs) 0 –1 0 0
Socialist Unification of the Basque Country (ESEI) 0 –1 0 0
Regionalist Aragonese Party (PAR) 0 –1 0 0
Basque Country Left (EE) 0 –1 0 0
Majorera Assembly (AM) 0 –1 0 0
Total 208 +1 0 208
Sources[12][13][14][15]
Seats
UCD
56.73%
PSOE
29.33%
PSC–ERC
4.81%
EAJ/PNV
3.85%
CD
1.44%
ADEI
1.44%
PSUC–PTC
0.48%
CiU
0.48%
HB
0.48%
CPMen
0.48%
INDEP
0.48%

AftermathEdit

Government formationEdit

Investiture
Adolfo Suárez (UCD)
Ballot → 30 March 1979
Required majority → 176 out of 350  Y
Yes
183 / 350
No
149 / 350
Abstentions
8 / 350
Absentees
10 / 350
Sources[16]

1980 motion of no confidenceEdit

Motion of no confidence
Felipe González (PSOE)
Ballot → 30 May 1980
Required majority → 176 out of 350  N
Yes
152 / 350
No
  • UCD (166)
166 / 350
Abstentions
21 / 350
Absentees
11 / 350
Sources[16]

1980 motion of confidenceEdit

Motion of confidence
Adolfo Suárez (UCD)
Ballot → 18 September 1980
Required majority → Simple  Y
Yes
180 / 350
No
164 / 350
Abstentions
2 / 350
Absentees
4 / 350
Sources[16]

1981 investitureEdit

Investiture
Leopoldo Calvo-Sotelo (UCD)
Ballot → 21 February 1981 23 February 1981 25 February 1981
Required majority → 176 out of 350  N Simple Simple  Y
Yes
  • UCD (165)
  • CD (9) (3 on 21 Feb)
  • CiU (9) (on 25 Feb)
  • PAR (1) (on 25 Feb)
  • UPN (1)
  • UA (1) (on 25 Feb)
169 / 350
  Cancelled
(as a result of the
23-F coup d'etat
attempt)
186 / 350
No
158 / 350
158 / 350
Abstentions
  • CiU (9) (on 21 Feb)
  • CD (6) (on 21 Feb)
  • PAR (1) (on 21 Feb)
  • UA (1) (on 21 Feb)
17 / 350
0 / 350
Absentees
6 / 350
6 / 350
Sources[16]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Results for PSOE (29.32%, 118 deputies and 49 senators) and PSPUS (4.46%, 6 deputies and 4 senators) in the 1977 election.
  2. ^ Results for AP (8.33%, 16 deputies and 2 senators) and DIV (0.08%, 0 seats) in the 1977 election.
  3. ^ Results for PDC (2.81%, 11 deputies) and UCiDCC (0.94%, 2 deputies and 0 senators) in the 1977 election.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Within PSOE.
  5. ^ a b Undecided and/or abstentionists excluded.
  6. ^ Within UCD.

BibliographyEdit

  • Carreras de Odriozola, Albert; Tafunell Sambola, Xavier (2005) [1989]. Estadísticas históricas de España, siglos XIX-XX (PDF) (in Spanish). Volume 1 (II ed.). Bilbao: Fundación BBVA. pp. 1072–1097. ISBN 84-96515-00-1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 September 2015. |volume= has extra text (help)

ReferencesEdit

Opinion poll sources
  1. ^ "El Gobierno estima en 170 los escaños de UCD y en 116 los del PSOE". El País (in Spanish). 2 March 1979.
  2. ^ "UCD, 166 escaños; PSOE, 132" (PDF). Diario 16 (in Spanish). 23 February 1979.
  3. ^ "Apretada victoria de UCD frente a los socialistas, que gana posiciones". El País (in Spanish). 6 February 1979.
  4. ^ "Izquierdas y derechas se reparten el electorado casi al cincuenta por ciento" (PDF). El País (in Spanish). 27 February 1979.
  5. ^ "Votos y posibles escaños en cada provincia" (PDF). El País (in Spanish). 27 February 1979.
  6. ^ a b "El PSOE se prepara para gobernar" (PDF). Diario 16 (in Spanish). 23 February 1979.
  7. ^ "UCD aventaja al PSOE en dos puntos". ABC (in Spanish). 22 February 1979.
  8. ^ a b c "Dos sondeos electorales en ABC". ABC (in Spanish). 7 February 1979.
  9. ^ a b "Equilibrio entre UCD y PSOE, con ligera ventaja socialista". El País (in Spanish). 6 February 1979.
  10. ^ "Centristas y socialistas se distancian del resto de las fuerzas políticas" (PDF). El País (in Spanish). 6 February 1979.
  11. ^ "Ante las municipales: PSOE, 38,7%; UCD, 27,3%". El Periódico de Catalunya (in Spanish). 17 December 1978.
  12. ^ "El PSOE aventaja a UCD". El País (in Spanish). 15 June 1978.
  13. ^ "Aumenta la tendencia hacia la izquierda y existen muchos indecisos" (PDF). El País (in Spanish). 15 June 1978.
  14. ^ "¿Crisis del "suarismo"?" (PDF). Diario 16 (in Spanish). 10 March 1978.
Other
  1. ^ a b c d "Spanish Constitution of 1978". Act of 29 December 1978. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  2. ^ "Constitución española, Sinopsis artículo 66". congreso.es (in Spanish). Congress of Deputies. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  3. ^ Carreras de Odriozola & Tafunell Sambola 2005, pp. 1077.
  4. ^ Gallagher, Michael (30 July 2012). "Effective threshold in electoral systems". Trinity College, Dublin. Archived from the original on 30 July 2017. Retrieved 22 July 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  5. ^ a b c "Electoral Rules Decree of 1977". Royal Decree-Law No. 20 of 18 March 1977. Official State Gazette (in Spanish). Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  6. ^ a b c "Constitution" (PDF). congreso.es. Congress of Deputies. Retrieved 19 June 2017.
  7. ^ a b c "Suben los indecisos y baja la izquierda" (PDF). Informaciones (in Spanish). 28 February 1978.
  8. ^ "Un tercio de la población no sabría a qué partido votar". La Vanguardia (in Spanish). 28 February 1978.
  9. ^ "Avance socialista ante las elecciones municipales" (PDF). Informaciones (in Spanish). 18 November 1977.
  10. ^ "El 57 por 100 de los españoles, de izquierdas" (PDF). Diario 16 (in Spanish). 4 January 1978.
  11. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. Congress. March 1979. National totals". Ministry of the Interior (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  12. ^ a b "Elecciones Generales 1 de marzo de 1979". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  13. ^ "Electoral Results Consultation. Senate. March 1979. National totals". Ministry of the Interior (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  14. ^ "Senate Election 1979". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 September 2017.
  15. ^ "Composición del Senado 1977-2021". Historia Electoral.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 1 October 2021.
  16. ^ a b c d "Congress of Deputies: Most important votes". historiaelectoral.com (in Spanish). Electoral History. Retrieved 28 September 2017.