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List of November 2019 Hong Kong protests

EventsEdit

2 NovemberEdit

Protests took place in Causeway Bay, Wan Chai, Central and Tsim Sha Tsui on 2 November, each of which is described below:

Causeway Bay election rallyEdit

128 pro-democracy candidates organised election rallies in the Central Lawn of Victoria Park, although the police earlier banned rallies in the same location.[1] These rallies, in their views, would not require prior police permission. They pointed out that, based on Chapter 9.11 of the Guidelines on Election-related Activities in respect of the District Council Election, the police would not need to be informed if pre-election meetings consisted of fewer than 50 supporters. In early afternoon, thousands of people entered Victoria Park. At 3:15pm, the police announced that the people were participating in an illegal assembly and warned them to leave immediately. Most of the people ignored the police warning, and continued to walk to Victoria Park.[1]

Subsequently, some protesters built road blocks nearby. In response, the police fired multiple rounds of tear gas into the Park.[2] Tear gas was also fired outside Hong Kong Central Library and Sogo Hong Kong. After that, protesters left Causeway Bay for Tin Hau and Wan Chai. Police used tear gas and water cannon trucks to disperse the crowd in Wan Chai.[3] Some protesters set up road blocks in Wan Chai and vandalised the Queen's Road East branch of state-run Xinhua News Agency.[4]

Central rallyEdit

Two rallies, to which the police did not object, took place in the afternoon at Edinburgh Place and Chater Garden in Central. In a 1 November press conference with the organisers and some pan-democrats, activists Joshua Wong and Ventus Lau urged the public to join the rallies.[5] Both rallies began as scheduled at 5 pm. However, at 5:10 pm, the police ordered the organisers to end the rallies immediately and asked all participants to leave by 5:30 pm.[6] Both the organisers and participants at the rally were dissatisfied with the police's decision.[7]

In response, some protesters threw Molotov cocktails on Lung Wo Road, blocking traffic, and set up barricades on Connaught Road Central, blocking off the road completely. Tear gas was then fired to disperse protesters. Protesters vandalised several exits of Central MTR station and a Yoshinoya branch in the area.[8] Police shoved a fireman against a wall after he accused police officers of hitting his fire engine with a tear gas projectile, though the police said the move was needed to disperse protesters. The police then pepper sprayed against journalists who filmed the scene and pushed them away from the scene. A first aid provider suffered severe back burns after reportedly being hit by a tear gas canister.[9]

Tsim Sha Tsui rallyEdit

A rally was organised at 4 pm in Park Lane Shopper's Boulevard, where more than 100 participants sang protest songs originated from Hong Kong and elsewhere. Some protesters shouted slogans and wore face masks. The organisers warned the participants that wearing face masks may be against the anti-mask law. Large numbers of riot police officers from the Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station arrived at the rally. They threatened to arrest those on face masks and disperse the crowds. After quarrels with protesters, the police returned to the police station.[10]

3 November mall sit-insEdit

 
Alex Chow Tsz-lok was found unconscious after falling from third floor of the parking garage

Several sit-in protests were held at shopping malls across Hong Kong. One took place around Cityplaza, a mall in the eastern part of Hong Kong Island, early in the evening. Entrances of two restaurants were spray painted. Outside Cityplaza, a Mandarin-speaking man slashed several people with a knife. The police stormed into the plaza. Outside the mall, Andrew Chiu, a Democratic Party district councillor representing Tai Koo Shing West, had his left ear bitten off by the man. A crowd then punched and kicked the man in retaliation.[11] Joey Kwok, a freelance photojournalist working for Stand News, and Tang Chak-man, a journalism student at Hong Kong Baptist University and a member of its Students' Union Editorial Board, were both arrested while reporting at the scene.[12] Stand News described the arrest as unreasonable, saying in a statement that Kwok was wearing a press vest, filming the police from a distance when he was surrounded and subdued by riot officers. Roland Chin, the head of Baptist University, said he was "deeply concerned" with the well-being of Tang, noting that that university staff and a lawyer had been sent to assist the student.[13]

Around Sheung Tak Estate in Tseung Kwan O at midnight, protesters gathered, with some setting up road blocks and throwing objects at the police. Then, the police attempted to disperse the crowd by firing tear gas rounds. Alex Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, was later found unconscious on the second floor of Sheung Tak Estate's car park, suspected to have fallen from the third floor early on the morning of 4 November.[14] The student died on 8 November, after two unsuccessful brain surgeries.[15][16][17]

4 NovemberEdit

Six reporters staged a silent protest at a routine police press conference. They each wore a safety helmet with one Chinese character, which, when combined, read "investigate police violence, stop police lies" (Chinese: 查警暴止警謊). The police stopped its online live stream two minutes later and cancelled the entire press conference 20 minutes later. Bon Ko, Police Public Relations Branch superintendent, suspended the conference as the reporters refused to either take off their helmets or leave the venue.[18] Later that day, the police staged a live broadcast on Facebook to express their views on the protests over the weekend.[19]

A spelling error by the Department of Justice meant that it was forced to drop charges against five defendants in relation to the protests. The five defendants, aged between 19 and 24, were charged with possessing explosive substances after Molotov cocktails were found in a flat in Wan Chai. Three attended the hearing at the Eastern Magistrates' Courts while two remained hospitalised. Immediately after the trio were released, more than 100 police officers in at least 11 police vehicles arrived outside the court building. A dozen officers in riot gear entered the court building to re-arrest them.[20] The defence counsel argued that the arrests inside court premises without the magistrate's approval constituted contempt of court.[21] The judiciary responded that the ground floor was a public area and not under its management.[22]

5 November Tsim Sha Tsui rallyEdit

Over a thousand people in Guy Fawkes masks gathered at 8 pm at the Urban Council Centenary Garden, Tsim Sha Tsui. The event was to mark the one month anniversary of the introduction of the Hong Kong's anti-mask law. The exact venue of the gathering was only announced thirty minutes before the start. The purpose was to minimise time for police preparation. The crowd occupied roads around the garden, with Hunghom Café, a restaurant seen as pro-government, and a few shops vandalised. At 9 pm, the police deployed a water cannon truck to the area, firing tear liquid at the crowd, some of which were reporters.[23]

Crowds gathered near Kwong Ming Court and Sheung Tak Estate in Tseung Kwan O late at night to protest. The stated purpose was to express dissatisfaction over the severe injuries suffered by a 22-year-old university student two days before, who at that time remained in critical condition. Police fired tear gas at protesters in response to the blockade of roads started by protesters.[24]

8 NovemberEdit

Chow Tsz-lok died at 8:09 am at the age of 22, after succumbing to a cardiac arrest, as a result of fall injuries sustained on 4 November. The police were criticized for intentionally obstructing the paramedics from attending to him, causing a delay in treatment, as it took the ambulance 19 minutes to reach Chow, seven minutes longer than their service pledge of 12 minutes; however, the police denied intentionally obstructing paramedics.[25] Leung Kwok-lai, the Fire Services Department Assistant Chief Ambulance Officer (Kowloon East) stated that the ambulance assigned to Chow was blocked by buses and private vehicles but that the ambulance did not come in contact with the police that were on duty.[26] Angered and saddened by the news, students from HKUST vandalized several stores perceived to be pro-Beijing and the residence of HKUST president Wei Shyy, demanding him to condemn police brutality.[27] Shyy later released an open letter demanding the government to conduct "thorough and independent investigation" regarding Chow's death.[28] Flash mob rallies mourning the death of Chow were held in various districts including Kwun Tong and Central during lunch hours.[29]

At night, thousands of mourners returned to the car park of Sheung Tak Estate and laid down flowers and origami for the deceased student. Meanwhile, protesters began clashing with the police in Causeway Bay and Mong Kok.[30] At the junction of Hamilton Street and Nathan Road in Yau Ma Tei, the police fired a warning shot to the sky.[31]

9 November vigilEdit

Thousands of people gathered in Tamar Park at night to mourn the deaths of "martyrs", people who died for the protests. During the rally, protesters prayed for the deceased, and shouted slogans urging Hong Kong people to take revenge. The organiser claimed that 100,000 people attended the vigil, while the police put the figure at 7,500.[32]

10 NovemberEdit

Protesters gathered in various shopping malls in Hong Kong including New Town Plaza in Sha Tin, and Festival Walk in Kowloon Tong, responding online calls to "shop" in these malls. Conflicts first erupted in Sha Tin when protesters vandalized the Sha Tin station and trashed a Maxim restaurant. Inside Festival Walk, protesters vandalized the branch of SimplyLife (which was under Maxim's operation). The police then stormed the mall and beat the protesters with police batons and pepper-sprayed them.[33] The police also indiscriminately pushed and beat people who were retreating down an elevator,[34] and shot pepper balls at people who have verbally insulted them. Journalists and shoppers were then forced to leave the mall.[35]

The police and protesters also clashed with each other in Tsuen Wan, as the Tsuen Wan riot police officers faced allegations that they have gang raped a young girl. During the confrontation between the police and the protester, the police shot a tear gas canister at the arm of a reporter from Now TV. The protesters then retreated to Citywalk in Tsuen Wan.[36] Scuffles between the police and the protesters also occurred in Tuen Mun, Mong Kok, Tai Po, and Tseung Kwan O, near the car park where Chow fell.[37] The Northern District saw the first usage of tear gas by the police after residents disgruntled by the police's search on teenagers who were playing basketball attempted to argue with officers near Ching Ho Estate, Sheung Shui.[38] Riot police climbed over a 3-meter gate of Kingswood Villas, Tin Shui Wai, and conducted arrests inside. Disgruntled residents later then confronted with the police.[39]

11–15 November city-wide strikeEdit

Protesters disrupted the morning commute on 11 November as part of a plan for a city-wide strike, calling for students, business owners and employees to skip work and boycott classes, as a response to HKUST student Alex Chow's mysterious fall to his death in a carpark. The protesters continued the strike over the following five days.[40]

Carrie Lam labelled the protesters as the enemy of the people and criticized the violence used by the protesters, which have "exceeded" their demands for democracy.[41] On the next day, she priased the citizens who insisted on going to work or to school despite the protests. Chinese leader Xi Jinping, speaking at a Brazil summit, voiced his support for the police, and added that "persistent radical and violent crimes" had undermined the rule of law in Hong Kong.[42]

Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen openly criticized the Hong Kong government on Facebook, stating they should not shoot the people-without-weapon, while Beijing and Hong Kong government should respond by the promise of democracy and freedom instead of bullets.[43] She later called the international community to stand with Hong Kong after the police confronted with the protesters at CUHK.[44] The United States has expressed "grave concerns" for the situation in Hong Kong and urged both sides to "exercise restraints". It urged the Beijing government to honor the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the Hong Kong government and the protesters to engage in dialogue to resolve the conflict.[45] UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson released a statement urging both sides to exercise restraint and that the UK government was deeply disturbed by the events. Like the US, he urged both camps to engage in dialogue.[46]

11 November - Dawn ActionEdit

The first day of the city-wide strike was named Dawn Action (Chinese: 黎明行動).[47] Protesters began to gather at 6:30 am and then began disrupting both MTR operations and surface transports starting from 7 am. Objects were thrown onto the train tracks of the East Rail Line, and later, molotov bottles were thrown onto a Central-bound train in Kwai Fong Station. [48] Tung Chung station was the first stations closed by the MTR Corporation, citing an "escalation" of events. MTR then shut down Whampoa station at 8:18am, and Kwai Fong Station at 8:53am. Kwun Tong Line, Tung Chung Line, East Rail Line, Ma On Shan Line and Light rail services were all disrupted.[49]

Protesters also made makeshift roadblocks in major thoroughfares in Kowloon and New Territories, including in districts such as Sha Tin, near the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Yuen Long, Hung Hom and Tsuen Wan.[49] In Kwai Fong, protesters set up a roadblock near the Metroplaza mall. A police officer riding a motorcycle charged into a crowd of demonstrators and zig-zagged across the road in an attempt to hit the protesters. The officer appeared not to hit any protesters straight on, but came very close to slamming straight into one. The police motorcycle was accused of deliberately ramming into the protesters, while the police claimed that he was trying to "separate" the protesters and the police and that the officer in question has been forced to take a sabbatical from work.[50][51][52] The video quickly went viral in the Internet, and pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong responded to the incident and stated that the police officer had gone 'berserk' and his behavior was 'disturbing'.[53]

External video
  Incident in which a man was set on fire by a protester
  Incident in which a pregnant woman is arrested

Later that day in Ma On Shan, a protester poured flammable liquid onto a man and lit him on fire during an argument between the man and the protesters.[54][55] The incident happened as the 57-year-old man confronted the group of protesters who were vandalising Ma On Shan station.[55] The man was afterwards transported to the Prince of Wales Hospital at Sha Tin in critical condition, with head trauma and severe burns.[55] A spokeswoman for the Fire Services Department said that the victim had second-degree burns on 28 per cent of his body.[55] The police treated the incident as an attempted murder case.[55] In response to the incident, the Chief Executive Carrie Lam said that the fire attack was an inhumane act.[56]

Amidst online calls to facilitate a general strike, protesters near Hong Kong Polytechnic University constructed makeshift roadblocks and barricades with various furniture outside the school campus.[57] The riot police then entered the university and shot tear gas canisters inside the school campus. Student protesters, in return, set up barricades and threw petrol bombs. Similar incidents also happened in University of Hong Kong and Chinese University of Hong Kong where the police shot tear gas into the campuses and student protesters confronted with the police for several hours. The major universities in Hong Kong and institutions organised by the Vocational Training Council have suspended their classes on that day.[49]

The police shot numerous canisters of tear gas to disperse the protesters in regions including Choi Hung and Tseung Kwan O, where a tear gas canister landed next to a secondary school.[58] In response to the shooting, office workers in Central, Hong Kong's central business district, marched on Pedder Street and briefly occupied Des Voeux Road Central and shouted out slogans, condemning the police as "murderers" during the lunchtime in a "Lunch with You" march. Riot police were deployed at 12:30 pm to warn the crowd that they would use force to disperse the protesters. At 12:47pm. the police shot fire tear gas to disperse the crowd. A man's head was hit by a tear gas canister.[58] The Hang Seng Index dropped 2.6% after tear gas was fired in Central.[59] The police reported that protesters have set up roadblocks in more than 120 locations in Hong Kong, and have arrested 266 people, whose age ranges from 11 to 74 years old.[60] At least 60 people were injured.[61] 255 canisters of tear gas, 204 shots of rubber bullets, 45 shots of beanbag rounds and 96 shots of sponge grenades were used by the police.[62]

Shooting incidentEdit
External video
  Incident in which a protester was shot by police (HKFP)

Before 7:30am on Monday 11 November 2019, a group of protesters had gathered at the intersection of Shau Kei Wan Road and Tai On Street, near Tai On Building in Sai Wan Ho. While they were trying to block the way, policemen arrived and tried to disperse the group. A masked young man wearing a white hoodie is said to have shouted at a policeman. The man raised his hands once to show that he held no weapons.[63] However, he has shown actions of tring to rob the gun from the policeman. A traffic policeman pointed a gun at the man's chest and quickly locked him in a neck choke with his left hand while still holding the gun, pointing it at pedestrians. One unarmed young man in black approached, acting aggressively also trying to rob the gun, was shot once in the abdomen and fell on the zebra crossing. A third young man, dressed in black, approached and was also shot, once or twice. In total, the traffic policeman fired three live rounds. [64]

A man in black fell onto the ground, while another man in black was shot twice when approaching the first wounded man. The man in white escaped when the situation was in mess. Another policeman arrived in the scene and control the shot young man-in-black. The police officer who opened fire continue to alert with the gun, while another police officer used his baton to warn the bystanders and protesters. After that, some riot police arrived and shot pepper spray at bystanders, which included many elderly.[65] They also arrested two people.[65] After the man was shot and lost his consciousness, a police officer pulled him up to sit, in an attempt to handcuff him [64] and shook his body, exacerbating the bleeding from his abdomen and dangerously reducing blood supply to his brain.[66]

The men were sent to the hospital. In 9:15 am, Hong Kong Hospital Authority (HA) revealed that one of the men was undergoing surgery in Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital. The abdomen of that man was shot, which resulted in damage to the right kidney and right-side liver with injury to the portal vein.[67] The man remained in a critical condition after surgery which removed a bullet, his right kidney, and part of the liver.[68]

The Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education (IVE) issued a declaration confirming the man as a student of their Chai Wan campus. In a statement, the Vocational Training Council, the IVE's parent organization, said they were distressed and sad over the man's injury, and has written to the Security Bureau asking for a complete investigation of the incident.[69] Salesian English School, the injured protester's alma mater, issued a statement condemning the police's use of excessive violence and fatal weapons, arguing that they chased citizens away indiscriminately and were indifferent to life. They expressed serious concern and urged the government to set up an independent commission of inquiry. They also highlighted their distress and urged youngsters to express their demands peacefully, protecting themselves and others.[70] In its press conference, the police confirmed that a traffic officer fired three live rounds; they claimed that one of the officers attempted to fire warning shots in response to protesters trying to grab the officer's gun, with one shot hitting one of the protesters at the scene.[71][72]

Amnesty International condemned the police's operations on November 11. It called for the police officer who shot the teens at a point blank range to be suspended from duty immediately and called the officer who rammed into the crowd of protesters "out of control with a mindset of retaliation".[60]

By the evening of 11 November 2019, the shooting incident had caused an outcry over at Good Hope School, the school of the traffic officer's two daughters. He resigned from the PTA.

12 November - Daybreak ActionEdit

Protests continued on 12 November, and it was named Daybreak Action (Chinese: 破曉行動).[47] In Central, a few thousand people, including office workers and protesters dressed in black, occupied streets at midday; tear gas was fired in the afternoon to clear out the remaining crowd. Some universities and schools closed, but the government ruled out an official suspension of classes to avoid being seen as submitting to protesters.[73] The police also confronted with the protesters outside City University of Hong Kong, who threw objects from the footbridge in an attempt to block the traffic in Kowloon Tong. The police commander allegedly instruct the officers to aim the protesters in the head when they were shooting.[74] The police and the protesters also clashed briefly at the University of Hong Kong. In HKU, protesters blocked the entrance of the HKU station. Several professors, including Dean of the Science Faculty, attempted to persuade the students to stop the blockade, though most black-clad protesters ignored them.[75]

For the entire day, the police clashed with the protesters in Chinese University of Hong Kong. At night, protesters marched into the Festival Walk mall in Kowloon Tong after the mall closed early and set a giant Christmas tree on fire; some glass guard rails and doors were also smashed.[76][77] A China Mobile shop was set on fire in Causeway Bay. In Sheung Shui, a train was firebombed and objects were thrown onto the train track. In Mong Kok, police fired multiple tear gas rounds as protesters blocked roads and vandalized public infrastructure, such as traffic lights and switch boxes.[78] In Tin Shui Wai, protesters besieged and started a fire inside the police station. In Sha Tin, a police van was lit on fire.[79][80]

13 November - Dagian ActionEdit

The third day of the strikes was named Dagian Action (Chinese: 晨曦行動).[47] People obstructed train services at multiple stations. At one point in the morning, the MTR suspended services on the Tsuen Wan, East Rail and Kwun Tong lines entirely, though partial service on the Kwun Tong line resumed later. A section of the West Rail line was also closed, along with a few other individual stations in the MTR network and parts of the Light Rail.[81] The Tolo Highway, which connects parts of the New Territories to Kowloon and Hong Kong Island, was shut down. The Transport Department reported that many bus routes were out of operation due to road conditions, with only 108 routes still running by 11 am.[82][83] Oxfam announced it was cancelling its annual Trailwalker charity event, due to take place the coming weekend, due to an inability to guarantee the safety of participants.[84]

The Educational Bureau announced that all schools will be suspended on Thursday, after criticism following Carrie Lam's statement the previous day which suggested that suspending classes would cause the government to fall into the "protesters' trap".[85] More than 100 schools already suspended classes individually that day, while at least ten higher educational institutions suspending classes for the rest of the week. The Bureau was criticized for the delay in class suspension, with school management staff calling for an extension of the school closure until the end of the week. Both the Hong Kong Association of the Heads of Secondary Schools and the Hong Kong Professional Teachers' Union noted the Bureau's failure to protect the safety of students in their late decision to suspend classes.[86]

External video
  The 13 November Sheung Shui clash, including the fatal throw (SCMP)

In Sheung Shui, a violent clash erupted between anti-government and pro-government protesters,[87][88] which saw both groups hurling bricks at each other.[89][90] The confrontation between the two groups occurred when the local residents tried to clear bricks from the street.[91][92][93] According to online footage, a man in a blue shirt threw a bamboo stick towards a group of black-clad people, leading to other people entering the scene to retaliate; around seven people then came behind the blue-clad man and started hurling bricks at the other group.[91][94] A 70-year-old man, surnamed Luo, who was using his mobile phone to record the conflict in the area of the fighting,[90][95] was hit in the head by a brick allegedly thrown by a protester.[90][96][97][95] The victim fell to the ground immediately and remained in an unconscious state.[90][95] He was first transported to the North District Hospital[90] and then to the Prince of Wales Hospital[90][98] in a critical and life-threatening condition,[90] before dying there at 10:51 pm on the following day.[99][98] The man was identified as an outsourced worker of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department.[100] At a regular briefing, the police stated that they have identified several suspects and that investigations were ongoing.[101] They classified his death as a murder, believing the attacker to have "maliciously [and] deliberately" carried out the act.[102] The Prince of Wales hospital said it would transfer the case to the Coroner's Court for investigation,[103] while the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department expressed "profound sadness" over the death.[104]

Lunchtime protests occurred in Central again. Protesters blocked the junction of Des Voeux Road Central and Pedder Street with bricks and bamboo poles; riot police responded by firing tear gas. A person with his head bleeding was tied up and flipped over by riot police; he remained conscious, while nearby protesters chanted for the release of that person.[105][106] At night, protesters set the toll gates of the Cross Harbour Tunnel on fire.[107] Protesters clashed with the police in Sha Tin, and one tear gas canister was shot into a fifth-floor apartment in Chuk Lam Court.[108] Flower troughs outside the Shatin Law Courts Building was also set on fire; the next day, both the Hong Kong Bar Association and the Law Society of Hong Kong condemned the arson as an attack on the city's rule of law.[109] A man died after allegedly falling from a tall building in Tsuen Wan. A 15-year-old boy, who was suspected to be stricken by a tear gas canister in Tin Shui Wai, remained in a critical condition after undergoing four hours of brain surgery at Tuen Mun Hospital overnight.[110]

14 November - Twilight ActionEdit

The fourth day of the city-wide strike was named Twilight Action (Chinese: 曙光行動).[47] Early in the morning, police fired tear gas into the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) campus in Hung Hom. One arrow was suspected to be shot from the university towards a group of police officers patrolling nearby, though no police officer was injured. In a press conference, police condemned the action, saying that the shot could have been lethal.[111] The Education Bureau announced that schools would suspend classes from Friday to Sunday. At lunchtime, hundreds of people protested on the streets in Central like the previous three days, while a few hundred also rallied on the streets in Taikoo Place in eastern Hong Kong Island.[112]

At noon in Sheung Shui, a group of around twenty middle-aged men used steel tubes to attack two young women who were setting up road blocks. The two women were unable to escape and were grabbed at the same time by a large man wearing a white shirt and jeans. One of the women was able to escape but the other was grabbed and dragged away quickly; she only escaped by taking off her jacket and backpack. She said she was not going to report the incident to police for fear of retribution from police, being concerned that she may instead be treated as a perpetrator.[113] The group of men also attacked other young people dressed in black at the same time. In an interview, the two women expressed their frustration at people fleeing the scene instead of going back to help them escape.[114]

At night, around a thousand people gathered at Edinburgh Place to express support towards firefighters and paramedics in Hong Kong for their work during the protests. Participants contrasted their work with that of the police, praising firefighter and ambulance teams for treating people equally and helped injured people regardless of their political views. The rally was authorised by police and no incidents occurred.[115]

15 November - Sunrise ActionEdit

The fifth day of the city-wide strike was named Sunrise Action (Chinese: 旭日行動).[116] Thousands of people, mainly office workers, protested on the streets in Central, chanting the slogan "Stand with Hong Kong" and raising an open hand, with the five fingers referencing the "five demands" associated with the protests. The CBD protests spread to more areas including Tai Koo Shing and Wong Chuk Hang.[117][118] Two German exchange students at Lingnan University were arrested for unlawful assembly. At night, a car was set on fire at CUHK.[119] Magnetic Asia, the organisers of Clockenflap, an annual music and arts festival in Hong Kong, announced the cancellation of the 2019 event, originally set to take place the following week.[120] Hundreds of runners proceeded with the original 100 km Oxfam Trailwalker course despite its official cancellation.[121]

16 NovemberEdit

External video
  The first public appearance of the People's Liberation Army on the streets (SCMP)

All lanes of the Tolo Highway reopened to traffic,[122] and the MTR's East Rail line returned to normal service, though the University and Sheung Shui stations remained closed.[123]

Thousands of people participated in the annual Hong Kong Pride Parade. The event was held at Edinburgh Place in Central in the form of a rally instead of a march like previous years, due to the police rejecting the organiser's application for a march due to safety concerns. Organisers estimated a turnout of 6,500 people, halved from previous years, while police estimated 850.[124]

The People's Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers have appeared publicly for the first time in the streets, in plain clothes and unarmed, to help clear roadblocks and other debris left during protests alongside local residents, firefighters, and police officers before marching back to the Kowloon East barracks around 5 pm.[125] That night, the government confirmed that it had not requested any assistance from the PLA.[126] The move was slammed by both the pro-democracy camp and by protesters.[127] In a joint statement, 24 pro-democracy lawmakers condemned the PLA garrison for allegedly breaching the Hong Kong Basic Law and the Garrison Law, which state that the garrison "shall not interfere in local affairs" and must notify the Hong Kong government before conducting activities involving public interests.[125][127] Civic Party lawmaker Dennis Kwok said he filed an urgent question at LegCo. The Citizens' Press Conference, a platform for protesters, described the incident as illustrating the "boiling frog syndrome" and setting a precedent to "violently suppress" Hongkongers in the future.[127]

17 NovemberEdit

External video
  Night clashes around Hong Kong Polytechnic University (SCMP)

Clashes occurred at the Polytechnic University. Protesters set fire to debris on a footbridge connecting the university campus to MTR Hung Hom station, and used catapults to launch objects at police. Police used a Long Range Acoustic Device to "issue warnings" at protesters, and deployed two water cannon trucks; the top of one of the trucks was set alight by protesters who threw petrol bombs at them. One police officer was hit in the leg with an arrow, piercing through his calf.[128] At midnight, police warned that live rounds may be used at protesters because police officers were targeted.[129][130]

Police locked down the PolyU campus at night by surrounding the main entrances to the university, and thoroughly searched everyone, including journalists, who wanted to leave. The police force issued a warning that anyone remaining on campus may be treated as taking part in a riot, ordering people to leave from an exit by the university's Lee Shau Kee Building.[131] Protesters called upon supporters to "rescue" those who remained at PolyU and were unable to leave; cars headed to the area early Monday morning.[132]

18 NovemberEdit

External video
  Hong Kong protesters fight with fire as police storm university (AP)

Police entered the PolyU campus at 5:30 am. A number of protesters were quickly arrested; some protesters threw Molotov cocktails at the police officers, while some police officers were seen kicking people on the ground. In a statement, the police denied "raiding" the campus, stating instead that they were conducting an operation on Cheung Wan Road.[133] In a press conference, PolyU student representative Owan Li said police prevented anyone from leaving the university, while Student Union President Derek Liu criticised the police for using "unequal force" and "weapons" to prevent anyone from escaping, saying that the union did not want a Tiananmen Square-like crackdown in Hong Kong.[134] At around 9:30 am, at least 40 people were detained outside Hotel Icon, PolyU's teaching hotel.[135] Student Union vice-president Ken Woo told RTHK that in the morning, at least 500 people remained on campus, while 70 to 100 people attempted to leave but were dispersed by tear gas and had to retreat back to the campus.[136] At 11 am, the Hong Kong Police Force shot tear gas towards Queen Elizabeth Hospital, forcing the hospital to suspend specialist services and to use plastic tape to seal its windows and doors.[137] In Central, lunchtime protests continued, with many showing support for students at PolyU.[138]

The Court of First Instance ruled that the Emergency Regulations Ordinance was partly unconstitutional in encroaching on the Legislative Council's power to make laws, while the government's anti-mask law was unconstitutional in that it "goes further than necessary" in restricting fundamental rights. In response, the police announced that they would suspend enforcing the anti-mask law.[139][140] The ruling was condemned by mainland Chinese authorities, which said it alone had authority to rule on constitutional matters in Hong Kong.[141][142]

External video
  Protesters escaping campus via rope (RTHK)

An estimated 100 secondary school students remained at PolyU in the afternoon. Some of their parents organized a sit-in near the university urging police to allow their children to leave, and about 20 school principals asked the government to allow them to enter the campus to meet their students inside and bring them out.[143][144] At night, some injured people left the campus with the help of paramedics, though they had to provide their personal information to police before leaving. Another group of protesters escaped the campus by climbing down ropes from a footbridge.[145] These protesters were then driven away with motorbikes on a road below.[146]

Thousands of people gathered on main roads in Kowloon at night, in solidarity with those who remained trapped at PolyU. Protesters threw petrol bombs, while police officers responded with tear gas rounds and water cannon.[147] Footage showed the police allegedly driving a van at high speed into protesters on Nathan Road during their clearance operation.[148] Police arrested 51 people who "claimed to be medics or journalists" at the university, saying that twelve of the purported medics did not have first aid qualifications; the police added that anyone walking out of the university campus would be charged with rioting.[149]

After midnight, more than 100 people left the PolyU campus, after a delegation of secondary school principals negotiated with police to allow minors to leave the campus and return home. Those under 16 were released after having their identities taken, though police reserved the right to prosecute them in the future; whereas, those who were 16 or above were arrested immediately.[150]

19 NovemberEdit

A number of protesters who remained at PolyU attempted to exit the campus via underground sewers. Some of them fell ill and were treated by medics. Divers under the Fire Services Department searched the pipes, but failed to find anyone after two hours of searching.[151]

ReferencesEdit

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