COVID-19 pandemic in Illinois

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic began in the U.S. state of Illinois on January 24, 2020, when a woman in Chicago, who had just returned from the pandemic's place of origin in Wuhan, Hubei, China, tested positive for the virus.[4] This was the second case of COVID-19 in the United States during the pandemic. The woman's husband was diagnosed with the disease a few days later, the first known case of human-to-human transmission in the United States. Community transmission was not suspected until March 8, when a case with no connection to other cases or recent travel was confirmed.[5]

COVID-19 pandemic in Illinois
COVID-19 in Illinois.svg
Map of counties in Illinois with confirmed cases (as of May 19):
  No confirmed cases reported
  <5 confirmed cases
  5-50 confirmed cases
  51-250 confirmed cases
  251-1,000 confirmed cases
  1,001-10,000 confirmed cases
  10,001+ confirmed cases
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationIllinois, United States
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseChicago
Arrival dateJanuary 24, 2020
(4 months and 2 days)
Confirmed cases112,017 [1]
Hospitalized cases3,763 [i][2]
Critical cases1,025
Ventilator cases605
Recovered2[ii][3]
Deaths
4,884
Government website
Illinois Department of Public Health: Coronavirus Disease 2019

Illinois has the third highest number of confirmed cases in the United States and has performed fifth highest COVID-19 testing.[6] As of May 25, there were 112,017 diagnosed cases in the state and 4,884 deaths.[1] The State of Illinois has not released data for recoveries other than the first two initial recovered cases in February.[1][3]

In mid-March, as the number of known cases rose into the double digits, Governor J. B. Pritzker issued a disaster proclamation, the state's equivalent of a state of emergency, to respond to the crisis. The state took measures to halt the spread of the disease by closing all schools and colleges, ordering a stop to eviction enforcements, ordering all bars and restaurants closed to sit-in diners, and otherwise restricting large gatherings of people. As the virus spread further, the state enacted an even stronger shelter in place order, affecting schools and businesses across the state.[7] At first declared between the dates of March 21 and April 7, the order was later extended until April 30, then May 29.[8][9][10]

TimelineEdit

COVID-19 cases in Illinois, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-01-24 1(n.a.)
2020-01-30 2(+100%)
2020-02-29
3(+50%)
2020-03-02
4(+33%)
2020-03-05
5(+25%)
2020-03-06
6(+20%)
2020-03-08
7(+17%)
2020-03-09
11(+57%)
2020-03-10
19(+73%)
2020-03-11
25(+32%)
2020-03-12
32(+28%)
2020-03-13
46(+44%)
2020-03-14
64(+39%)
2020-03-15
93(+45%)
2020-03-16
105(+13%)
2020-03-17
160(+52%) 1(n.a.)
2020-03-18
288(+80%) 1(=)
2020-03-19
422(+47%) 4(+300%)
2020-03-20
585(+39%) 5(+25%)
2020-03-21
753(+29%) 6(+20%)
2020-03-22
1,049(+39%) 9(+50%)
2020-03-23
1,285(+22%) 12(+33%)
2020-03-24
1,535(+19%) 16(+33%)
2020-03-25
1,865(+21%) 19(+19%)
2020-03-26
2,538(+36%) 26(+37%)
2020-03-27
3,024(+19%) 34(+31%)
2020-03-28
3,491(+15%) 47(+38%)
2020-03-29
4,596(+32%) 65(+38%)
2020-03-30
5,057(+10%) 73(+12%)
2020-03-31
5,994(+19%) 99(+36%)
2020-04-01
6,980(+16%) 141(+42%)
2020-04-02
7,695(+10%) 157(+11%)
2020-04-03
8,904(+16%) 210(+34%)
2020-04-04
10,357(+16%) 243(+16%)
2020-04-05
11,256(+8.7%) 274(+13%)
2020-04-06
12,262(+8.9%) 307(+12%)
2020-04-07
13,549(+10%) 380(+24%)
2020-04-08
15,078(+11%) 462(+22%)
2020-04-09
16,422(+8.9%) 528(+14%)
2020-04-10
17,887(+8.9%) 596(+13%)
2020-04-11
19,180(+7.2%) 677(+14%)
2020-04-12
20,852(+8.7%) 720(+6.4%)
2020-04-13
22,025(+5.6%) 794(+10%)
2020-04-14
23,247(+5.5%) 868(+9.3%)
2020-04-15
24,593(+5.8%) 948(+9.2%)
2020-04-16
25,733(+4.6%) 1,072(+13%)
2020-04-17
27,575(+7.2%) 1,134(+5.8%)
2020-04-18
29,160(+5.7%) 1,259(+11%)
2020-04-19
30,357(+4.1%) 1,290(+2.5%)
2020-04-20
31,508(+3.8%) 1,349(+4.6%)
2020-04-21
33,059(+4.9%) 1,468(+8.8%)
2020-04-22
35,108(+6.2%) 1,565(+6.6%)
2020-04-23
36,934(+5.2%) 1,688(+7.9%)
2020-04-24
39,658(+7.4%) 1,795(+6.3%)
2020-04-25
41,777(+5.3%) 1,874(+4.4%)
2020-04-26
43,903(+5.1%) 1,933(+3.1%)
2020-04-27
45,883(+4.5%) 1,983(+2.6%)
2020-04-28
48,102(+4.8%) 2,125(+7.2%)
2020-04-29
50,355(+4.7%) 2,215(+4.2%)
2020-04-30
52,918(+5.1%) 2,355(+6.3%)
2020-05-01
56,055(+5.9%) 2,457(+4.3%)
2020-05-02
58,505(+4.4%) 2,559(+4.2%)
2020-05-03
61,499(+5.1%) 2,618(+2.3%)
2020-05-04
63,840(+3.8%) 2,662(+1.7%)
2020-05-05
65,962(+3.3%) 2,838(+6.6%)
2020-05-06
68,232(+3.4%) 2,974(+4.8%)
2020-05-07
70,873(+3.9%) 3,111(+4.6%)
2020-05-08
73,760(+4.1%) 3,241(+4.2%)
2020-05-09
76,085(+3.2%) 3,349(+3.3%)
2020-05-10
77,741(+2.2%) 3,406(+1.7%)
2020-05-11
79,007(+1.6%) 3,459(+1.6%)
2020-05-12
83,021(+5.1%) 3,601(+4.1%)
2020-05-13
84,698(+2%) 3,792(+5.3%)
2020-05-14
87,937(+3.8%) 3,928(+3.6%)
2020-05-15
90,369(+2.8%) 4,058(+3.3%)
2020-05-16
92,457(+2.3%) 4,129(+1.7%)
2020-05-17
94,191(+1.9%) 4,177(+1.2%)
2020-05-18
96,485(+2.4%) 4,234(+1.4%)
2020-05-19
98,030(+1.6%) 4,379(+3.4%)
2020-05-20
100,418(+2.4%) 4,525(+3.3%)
2020-05-21
102,686(+2.3%) 4,607(+1.8%)
2020-05-22
105,444(+2.7%) 4,715(+2.3%)
2020-05-23
107,796(+2.2%) 4,790(+1.6%)
2020-05-24
110,304(+2.3%) 4,856(+1.4%)
2020-05-25
112,017(+1.6%) 4,884(+0.58%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Illinois.
Sources: Daily IDPH reports[11][12]

JanuaryEdit

On January 24, 2020, Illinois health officials announced the first confirmed case the novel coronavirus infection in the state of Illinois, also the second confirmed case in the United States. The case was a woman in her 60s who had returned from a December 25 – January 13 visit to Wuhan, China, the place of origin of the outbreak, where she had frequently visited a hospitalized relative and other relatives with respiratory illnesses.[13] She began to experience symptoms after returning to Chicago, and was isolated at St. Alexius Medical Center in the Chicago suburb of Hoffman Estates.[14]

On January 30, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed that the first known human-to-human transmission in the U.S. of the SARS-CoV-2 virus (then known as 2019-nCoV) had occurred in Chicago. According to the CDC, the woman who was the first Illinois case had transmitted the virus to her husband, who was confirmed as the second Illinois case and the sixth U.S. case after testing positive. He was isolated at the same hospital as his wife.[15]

FebruaryEdit

On February 7, the two Illinois cases were released from the hospital and began home isolation.[16] Both made full recoveries and were released from isolation on February 14.[17][3] On February 29, a third Illinois resident tested positive for the virus in suburban Cook County.[18]

MarchEdit

On March 2, a fourth case was announced by Illinois officials, the wife of the third case; she subsequently began home isolation. Other details were announced by officials: her husband had been isolated at Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights since his case was reported two days earlier; both individuals were in their 70s. The couple was possibly exposed to the virus through community transmission, with recent travel to Palm Springs.[19] The man was later released to home isolation.[20][21]

On March 5, public health officials in Chicago reported a fifth case of coronavirus in a man in his 20s. The man, a student at Vanderbilt University,[22] recently traveled to Italy to study abroad, and returned to Illinois on a flight to Chicago O'Hare International Airport. The new case was hospitalized at Rush University Medical Center.[23] On March 6, a sixth case was reported in Chicago. The patient, a classroom assistant in the Vaughn Occupational High School, had been on the Grand Princess cruise ship where multiple passengers had tested positive.[24]

On March 8, a seventh case was announced in Cook County. The man in his 60s had not traveled to an area impacted by coronavirus, and did not have any contact with other cases; as a result, Illinois officials reported the patient as the first evidence of community transmission within Illinois. He was also reported to be in serious condition.[25] Additionally, a Missouri case connected to Illinois was confirmed; the patient had returned from Italy on a flight to O'Hare Airport, then took an Amtrak train to St. Louis, where she tested positive.[26]

On March 9, four additional cases were announced in Cook County, bringing the state's total number of cases to eleven. Two of the new cases were family members of the classroom aide diagnosed on March 6; the two others included a California resident who traveled to Illinois, and a woman who had returned from an Egyptian cruise which was linked to many COVID-19 cases.[27] In response to the growing number of cases in the state and the country, Governor J. B. Pritzker announced a disaster proclamation (a state of emergency) for the state of Illinois.[28] On March 10, Governor Pritzker announced eight new presumptive positive cases, two of which were the first cases outside of Cook County (in Kane and McHenry Counties). These cases brought Illinois's total number of cases to 19.[29]

On March 11, six new cases of the coronavirus were reported by officials, including the first in Lake County, bringing the total to 25.[30] One of these cases was located at One Prudential Plaza, marking the first confirmed case in a major downtown Chicago office building.[31] Illinois colleges and universities, such as Northwestern University and the University of Illinois, announced measures to combat the spread of the virus on their campuses through extensions of Spring Break as well as implementing online classes for part or all of the remaining semester.[32][33] In response to the growing pandemic, both Former Vice President Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders canceled campaign rallies planned for Illinois. Additionally, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot canceled the city's annual St. Patrick's Day parade and Chicago River dyeing in response to coronavirus.[34] On March 12, seven new cases of the coronavirus were reported by officials, including the first child who tested positive in Illinois. This brought the total to 32.[35]

On March 13, fourteen new cases of the coronavirus were reported by officials, bringing the total to 46. Governor Pritzker announced statewide school closures beginning March 17 until March 30.[36] Casinos statewide would close for fourteen days beginning on March 16.[37] Additionally, the Circuit Court of Cook County announced that "no orders for an eviction or foreclosure will be entered during the 30-day period,"[38] and the Archdiocese of Chicago announced it would stop holding public Mass from March 14.[39]

On March 14, the total number of cases in Illinois rose to 66. These included the first cases in Downstate Illinois, with patients testing positive in Woodford, Cumberland, and St. Clair Counties.[40] A new case in DuPage County was the first Illinoisan resident of a long-term care facility to contract the virus. At O'Hare Airport, travelers returning from Europe faced enhanced screening from U.S. Customs officials due to the federal travel ban put in place the day before. The screenings led to long waits and overcrowded facilities in the airport, which both Governor Pritzker and Mayor Lightfoot harshly criticized as unsafe.[41]

On March 15, the number of cases rose to 93. Cases were confirmed in Champaign, Clinton, Sangamon, Whiteside, and Winnebago Counties; meanwhile, Governor Pritzker ordered all bars and restaurants closed to sit-in diners.[42] One of the cases in Sangamon County was a woman in critical condition who was hospitalized in Springfield, the state's capital.[43] On March 16, the number of cases rose to 105, and Peoria and Will Counties confirmed their first cases.[1][44] Governor Pritzker announced restrictions for public gatherings, limiting crowds to under 50 people amid growing concerns over the community spread of the virus in the state.[34]

 
Signs during the outbreak asking restaurant patrons to wash and sanitize their hands

On March 17, the number of cases rose to 160. Officials announced the first death related to COVID-19, a woman in her 60s from Chicago; a retired South Side nurse, the woman suffered from an underlying condition later revealed to be asthma, and died at the University of Chicago Medical Center.[45][46] 22 of the new cases were confirmed at a Willowbrook nursing home, including 18 residents and four staff members; these cases were related to an initial case announced on March 14. Northwestern University, University of Illinois at Chicago, and the Illinois Institute of Technology confirmed that individuals on campus had tested positive for the coronavirus. Other new cases included employees at Midway International Airport and a Chicago Fire Department worker.[47]

 
March 18, 2020 sign at a home improvement box store in Brickyard detailing what has sold out during the COVID-19 outbreak

On March 18, an increase of 128 new cases brought the total number of individuals infected to 288. Kendall and Madison Counties confirmed their first cases.[1] The new cases included 20 more individuals at the Chateau Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in DuPage County, bringing the total number of the cases at the nursing home to 42.[48] Many students and staff members in various schools and colleges in Illinois also tested positive.[49]

On March 19, there were 134 new coronavirus cases reported throughout the state along with three deaths which included a male in his 50s from Will County, a female in her 80s from Cook County, and an out-of-state female in her 70s who was in Sangamon County.[50] The number of cases being reported has rapidly risen as the tests are becoming more readily available along with an increase in testing by and hospital and commercial laboratories. The health departments of Adams and McLean Counties announced that they each had a confirmed case of COVID-19.[51][52]

 
The Chicago Theater and empty streets on March 20, 2020

On March 20, the Illinois Department of Public Health announced that there was an increase of 163 new cases along with the death of a woman in her 70s in Cook County.[53] The age range for those with confirmed contraction of the COVID-19 disease range from ages 3 to 99. Christian County announced the first confirmed case contracted within that county.[54] Work began on converting McCormick Place into an alternate care facility for 3,000 patients. The $15 million project is being paid for by FEMA and is scheduled for completion on April 30.[55]

On March 21, there was an increase of another 168 confirmed cases announced in the state along with another death, a man in his 70s in Cook County.[56] This brought the total deaths from the coronavirus disease to six. DeKalb County reported its first confirmed case of the disease. Thousands of residents of Rogers Park, Chicago participate in #chicagosingalong singing Livin' on a Prayer by Bon Jovi. Bon Jovi sent congratulations via Instagram.[57]

 
Streets of Chicago, empty on March 22, 2020

On March 22, the number of confirmed cases once again rose by 296 bringing the number of COVID-19 cases to 1049 throughout the state, one of which was an infant.[58] Officials announced that there were three new deaths related to the disease of which claimed the life of two men from Cook County that were in their 80s and a McLean County woman in her 70s. Jo Daviess, Livingston, Rock Island, and Stephenson counties all reported their first case of the disease on this day.

 
Chicago "L" tracks in Chicago over Wabash Avenue with empty streets on March 23, 2020

On March 23, State officials announced an increase of 236 cases and an additional three deaths, all of which were males from Cook County. Two of the deaths were men in their 80s and one in his 90s.[59] Monroe County announced its first case of the Coronavirus disease on this date which brings the total counties with confirmed cases to 31 of the 102 that are in the state.

On March 24, there were 250 more confirmed cases of the coronavirus along with an additional four deaths throughout the state.[60] The demographics of the deaths consisted of three Cook County residents, of whom two were in their 60s and one was a male in his 50s; the fourth was a DuPage County resident in her 90s. Grundy County reported its first case on this date.

On March 25, 330 more confirmed cases of the coronavirus were announced along with three more deaths related to the disease.[61] Those deaths were a Will County woman in her 50s, a Cook County man in his 60s, and a Kane County man in his 90s. Two Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) correctional officers along with one man incarcerated at Stateville Correctional Center have tested positive with the coronavirus along with a contractual worker at Sheridan Correctional Center. Both correctional facilities went on 14-day lockdowns as a precaution. At the Stateville facility, those who have been identified as being potentially exposed are being quarantined to reduce risk to others. IDOC determined, after consulting with IDPH, that the staff and incarcerated men at the Sheridan facility was at low to medium risk of exposure. Two other incarcerated men at North Lawndale Adult Transition Center were confirmed to have contracted the disease.[62] Douglas, Marshall, and Morgan counties have reported their first confirmed cases.[63][64][65] Northern Illinois University (NIU) announced that two students tested positive for COVID-19.[66] One of the students was briefly on campus on March 16 whereas the other student had not been on the campus since March 3 but had recently traveled with a small group of NIU students.[67]

On March 26, the IDPH announced 673 new cases of coronavirus disease along with seven deaths. These deaths included a woman in her 90s, a man in his 70s, two men and two women in their 60s and a man in his 50s; no county information for these individuals was available.[68] Iroquois County Public Health Department officials announced the first confirmed positive case in Iroquois County.[69]

On March 27, another 488 new confirmed cases of coronavirus disease were announced along with eight new deaths.[70] Of the fatalities caused by the coronavirus disease, 86% were individuals over the age of 60. Bureau and Henry Counties announced cases on this date.

On March 28, officials announced another 465 new confirmed cases along with thirteen deaths, one of which was an infant in Cook County.[71] The other twelve deaths were from the following counties: Cook (two males in their 60s, two males in their 70s, a female in her 70s, a female in her 80s, and a male in his 80s), McHenry (a male in his 50s), Kane (two males in their 70s), Lake (a female in her 90s), and Will (a female in her 90s). Carroll, Fayette, and Macon counties reported their first cases on this day.

On March 29, there were 1,105 new cases of coronavirus disease reported along with 18 additional deaths in six Illinois counties. Those deaths were reported in the following counties: Cook (a male in his 50s, two females in their 60s, two males in their 70s, three females in their 70s, two in their males 80s, and a female in her 80s), DuPage County (a male in his 60s), Kane (a male in his 40s and two males in their 90s), Kendall (a male in his 60s), LaSalle (a male in his 80s), and St. Clair (a female in her 70s). Bond, Knox, Menard, and Montgomery counties reported their first confirmed cases on this date.[72] The same day, Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker announced that an infant in the city of Chicago died after testing positive for COVID-19.[73] This death, which was first death for any infant in the United States who tested positive for COVID-19, came despite the fact that infants made up a small fraction of COVID-19 related deaths worldwide.[74]

On March 30, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the IDPH, announced that there were 461 new cases and eight deaths. Counties that reported deaths were Cook (a male in his 50s, a male in his 60s, a female in her 60s, a female in her 70s), DuPage (a male in his 60s), Kendall (a female in her 60s), and Will (a male in his 50s and a male in his 60s). One death was an incarcerated man from Stateville Correctional Center. Additionally, there were twelve men that are incarcerated at Stateville which are now hospitalized, with several requiring ventilators. An additional 77 incarcerated individuals with symptoms who are isolated at the facility along with eleven staff members that are also being isolated. Testing for COVID-19 disclosed the first case of infection on March 22 in Cook County Jail. 10% of the 5,000 inmates were released as a cautionary measure, but the number of infections had risen to 134 by March 30.[75] The first confirmed cases of coronavirus disease were announced on this day for Clark, Crawford, Marion, Randolph, and Saline Counties.[76]

On March 31, an additional 937 confirmed cases were announced along with 26 deaths that brought the total of deceased to 99. Ford and Ogle counties reported their first confirmed cases on this date whereas the following counties had deaths related to the disease: Cook (two males in their 50s, one male in his 60s, two females in their 60s, five males in their 70s, two females in their 70s, three males in their 80s, one female in her 80s, and one male in his 90s), DuPage (two females in their 70s), Kane (one male in his 80s), Lake (one female in her 60s), McLean (one male in his 70s), Morgan (one male in his 80s), St. Clair (one female in her 30s), Will (one male in his 80s and one female in her 80s).[77]

AprilEdit

On April 1, Massac and Vermilion counties both saw their first reported cases.[78]

On April 2, Logan, Macoupin, Mercer, Moultrie, and Piatt counties all reported their first confirmed cases.[79]

On April 3, DeWitt, Effingham, and Jersey counties reported their first confirmed cases of the disease.[80]

On April 4, there were an additional 1,453 new cases along with 33 deaths across the state. These new cases brought Illinois over the 10,000 mark for a total of 10,357 confirmed coronavirus cases. Jasper, Lee, Mason, and Pike counties all reported their first confirmed cases on this date.[81]

On April 5, Boone, Calhoun and Gallatin counties reported their first confirmed cases.[82]

On April 7, officials with IDPH announced that there were 73 deaths due to the coronavirus, which as of this date was the highest increase of deaths since the pandemic began within the state. Coles, Lawrence, Richland, and Shelby counties all reported their first cases on this date. Counties that reported deaths included Champaign, Christian, Cook, DuPage, Ford, Kane, Kankakee, Lake, Madison, McHenry, Monroe, Tazewell, Will, and Winnebago.[83]

 
Members of the Illinois Air National Guard assemble medical equipment at the McCormick Place Convention Center in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Chicago. April 8, 2020

On April 9, Hancock, Pulaski, and Schuyler counties reported their first confirmed cases.[84]

On April 10, Fulton and Greene counties announced their first confirmed cases.[85]

On April 11, McDonough, Perry and Warren counties reported their first cases. The Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs reported that an employee of the Illinois Veterans Home in Manteno tested positive for COVID-19 and is isolating at their home. There was no indication of any residents contracting the disease at any of the Illinois Veterans Homes throughout the State. The Prince home, a separate stand-alone facility on the Manteno grounds which serves homeless veterans, four of its employees and two homeless veterans have tested positive to COVID-19.[86]

On April 12, the number of tests that had been performed topped the 100,000 mark.[87]

On April 13, Johnson County announced their first confirmed case.[88]

On April 14, Clay County announced their first case.[89]

On April 15, the director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, announced Union County's first reported case.[90]

On April 16, the number of positive cases of the coronavirus disease surpassed the 25,000 mark with 1,140 new cases for a total of 25,733 cases. Alexander County reported its first confirmed case on this date which brought the number of counties with cases to 90 of the 102 within the state. There were an additional 124 deaths, which was the highest daily death total to date, to bring the total deaths to 1,072.[91]

On April 17, the single day total of confirmed cases rose by 1,842 cases to bring the total cases to 27,575. This was due to the increased number of tests being performed daily across Illinois. Henderson and Wayne counties both reported their first cases of the coronavirus which brought the counties with confirmed cases to 92 of the 102 counties within the State of Illinois.[92]

On April 18, officials announced Hamilton County's first case.[93]

On April 19, Cook, DuPage, Kane, Madison, Monroe, Sangamon, St. Clair, and Will counties all reported deaths which increased the deaths by 33 for a total of 1,290.[94]

On April 20, Cass and White counties both announced their first confirmed cases.[95]

On April 21, Hardin County announced its first confirmed case.[96]

Government responseEdit

State governmentEdit

On March 9, Governor J. B. Pritzker issued a disaster proclamation, the state's equivalent to a state of emergency, as four new cases were announced in the state.[97] Starting on March 9 onwards, Pritzker and the Illinois Department of Public Health have been conducting daily press briefings about the crisis.[98][99] On March 18, Governor Pritzker announced a new website that would be a centralized hub with information an resources related to the coronavirus and the impact on Illinois residents and businesses.[100]

During March, the state government announced a series of escalating measures to achieve social distancing. On March 13, Governor Pritzker announced that all schools in Illinois would close for a period to begin the following Tuesday and last until the end of the month. The governor's announcement came after hundreds of public school districts and private schools had already announced closures.[101] On March 15, Governor Pritzker announced that all bars and restaurants will be closed until March 30 as to "[enforce] and [preserve] the safety and health of all residents of Illinois." Businesses with delivery and takeout options will still be able to serve.[102][103][104] On March 16, Governor Pritzker announced that all gatherings of 50 or more people will be canceled in accordance with new CDC guidelines.[105] The Illinois Gaming Board suspended all video gaming operations at all licensed video gaming establishments and suspended gambling operations at all casinos from March 16 until March 30.[106][107] On March 20, Governor Pritzker announced a statewide stay-at-home order starting on March 21 until April 7, 2020. All non-essential businesses are required to be closed (e.g. theaters, parks, libraries, etc.) whereas essential businesses such as grocery stores, gas stations, hospitals, pharmacies are to remain open.[108] On March 31, Governor Pritzker extended the statewide stay-at-home order until April 30.[109] On April 23, Governor Pritzker extended the statewide stay-at-home order through May 29 with some modifications.[9][110][10] Churches were also prohibited from holding meetings with more than 10 people in attendance. Some churches defied the governor's order, held meetings and then filed federal lawsuits.[111]

Services offered by the state government have also been affected. Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White announced that all driver services facilities throughout the state would be closed from March 17 through March 31. White's office stated that expiration dates will be extended by 30 days through an emergency rule, this includes for driver's licenses, identification cards, vehicle registrations, document filings and other transactions.[112] The Illinois Department of Natural Resources announced that all state sites, which include state parks, fish and wildlife areas, recreational areas, and historic sites would be closed until further notice. This also included the Illinois State Museum and its branches which include the Research and Collections Center, Dickson Mounds Museum in Lewistown and the Lockport Gallery in Lockport.[113][114] On March 27, the Illinois Secretary of State, Jesse White announced that notaries public are granted the authority to perform remote, online notarizations during the COVID-19 pandemic via an executive order, Executive Order in Response to COVID-19 (COVID-19 Executive Order No. 12).[115][116] This authority is temporary and is set to expire when the state disaster proclamation is removed.

These changes have been accompanied by public policy responses from the state government. On March 25, the Illinois tax filling deadline was extended from April 15 to July 15.[117] This was announced by Governor Pritzker during the daily coronavirus press conference along with a bulletin release from the Illinois Department of Revenue.[118] Gov. Pritzker also announced that three new emergency assistance programs that allow for small businesses to have access more than $90 million in aid. These programs are available through the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO).[119]

The state government has also coordinated a public health response. The State of Illinois is working with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the private companies of Wal-Mart and Walgreens to provide testing sites in the hardest-hit communities within the state.[53] In a March 22 interview on CNN's State of the Union, Governor Pritzker compared the federal government's procurement of essential medical supplies to the "Wild West". "We're competing against [other states], we’re competing against other countries," Pritzker said.[120] When asked about protective masks for medical workers, FEMA Director Peter Gaynor could not give any specific answers.[121] On March 31, a CMAS Severe (emergency alert) notification was issued to smartphones in Illinois and neighboring states with the message: "State needs licensed healthcare workers to sign-up at IllinoisHelps.net to fight COVID-19." The message was initiated by Illinois Healthcare Professional Emergency Volunteer Program, a state-run emergency response organization.[122]

On March 17, 60 members of the Illinois National Guard were activated to assist during the COVID-19 pandemic in Illinois for the anticipated need of medical staffing and logistic support. Of those 60, 43 are airmen from the Peoria-based 182d Airlift Wing's Medical Group whereas the other 17 are planners and liaison officers from both the Army and Air National Guard.[123] On March 26, roughly 50 additional Illinois National Guard soldiers from the 1844th Transportation Company based in East St. Louis were activated to assist with the COVID-19 response operations.[124] The majority of those activated soldiers will help with medical warehouse operations in central Illinois whereas four soldiers will be assigned to the State Emergency Operations Center in Springfield, "where their jobs will be to assist with communications, analyze virus response operations and give analysis for possible flood response operations" as stated in a press release.

County governmentsEdit

McHenry County Department of HealthEdit

On April 11, the McHenry County Department of Health (MCDH) issued a press release pertaining to a court order granting access to the personal health information for patients that had contracted COVID-19 by multiple police agencies.[125][126] These patient records are protected with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 along with State of Illinois' Medical Patient Rights Act. Both Acts restrict access to patient records from individuals that unless medically necessary. The MCDH determined that providing access to the addresses of the patients with confirmed cases of COVID-19 would suffice both the request by police agencies and both patient privacy acts. However, the rationale by the police agencies "to protect their officers and deputies by allowing them to avoid contact or don protective equipment" and the McHenry County court issued a temporary order to release the names. The agencies which requested this information are police departments of City of McHenry, Village of Algonquin, City of Woodstock, and the Village of Lake in the Hills as stated within the court order from the 22nd Judicial Circuit Court in McHenry County.[127]

Municipal governmentsEdit

City of AltonEdit

On April 3, Alton Mayor Brant Walker provided his weekly address regarding COVID-19 via a video on the City of Alton's Facebook page. In the video he stated that he had directed the Alton Police Department to use discretion towards those who did not comply with the State of Illinois stay-at-home order.[128] On April 6, Alton Police were investigating a large gathering at Hiram's Tavern located in downtown Alton, which was in violation of the stay-at-home order. Officers issued criminal complaints to all in attendance, including the mayor's wife whom also was in attendance at the establishment. Each complaint is a class A misdemeanor charge that is punishable by up to 364 days in jail and/or a fine of $2,500. The mayor's statement regarding his wife was "I instructed the Police Chief to treat her as he would any citizen violating the 'Stay At Home' order and to ensure that she received no special treatment".[129][130]

City of CarbondaleEdit

On April 6, Carbondale City Council passed two ordinances with the first declaring a state of emergency and the second to provide guidance on how to enforce the stay-at-home order that was issued by the State of Illinois. The first ordinance allows the city manager the abilities to close any city facility in order to ensure the health and safety of city employees and the community, to enter into temporary agreements with bargaining units to ensure continuation of city services and to adjust personnel policies, designate areas for carry-out and curbside pickup from restaurants in the downtown area of the city, and to extend deadlines for licenses issued under the city code. The ordinance also officially suspends the charging late fees for water and sewer, stopping the disconnection of water and sewer service for non-payment, extension of the payment deadline of the city's food and beverage tax along with the package liquor tax until May 20, extends the motor fuel taxes and hotel/motel taxes until April 30. An additional item that was added was the suspension of the enforcement of the tall grass and weed ordinance. The second ordinance allowed for a streamlined process of the enforcement of the multiple executive orders issued by Governor Pritzker. Typically these orders would be sent through the Jackson County Health Department and then to the Illinois Department of Public Health for review and then off to the county state's attorney for enforcement. Instead these orders will be processed by the City of Carbondale and enforced by the Carbondale Police Department by way of fines up to $750 per day and alleviates a "minor violation from becoming a misdemeanor or felony charge".[131]

City of ChicagoEdit

On March 12, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced that after meeting with Comcast executives, the company would "double internet speeds to low income households nationally. Also, 60 free days of internet for low income households" would be available starting March 16.[132]

On March 26, the City of Chicago closed parks, beaches, the 606 trail network, and the lakefront due to too many people gathering with violators facing fines and possible arrest.[133][134]

On April 8, Mayor Lightfoot placed a curfew on all liquor sales after 9:00pm in the City of Chicago. This curfew would go into affect on April 9 and remain in place through the end of the State's stay-at-home order.[135]

On May 17, days after the city was sued by a Romanian church that had been ordered not to hold church services even with social distancing, the mayor closed street parking for 9 blocks on Sunday. The pastor complained: “The mayor is inciting hate against the church which is very sad. A lot of our members risked their lives to escape Communism, only to find it germinating in 2020 under mayor Lightfoot in Chicago.” [136][137]

City of RockfordEdit

On March 30, the Rockford city council passed an ordinance allowing for fines of $750 per day for businesses not adhering to the closure of nonessential businesses during the statewide executive order issued by Governor Pritzker.[138]

City of SpringfieldEdit

On March 27, Springfield Mayor Jim Langfelder issued an emergency order that restricted public use of the Municipal Center complex. This order prohibits anyone other than city employees conducting public business from assembling, loitering or storing personal property at the municipal complex which included the city's public library, Lincoln Library and Howarth Plaza. Both of these places are popular amongst the city's homeless population.[139] On March 31, Mayor Langfelder issued a second order that halts all evictions and the repossession of vehicles within Springfield and lasts the duration of Governor Pritzker's executive order that was declared on March 20.[140] On April 8, Mayor Langfelder issued another emergency order allowing for the Springfield Police Department to issue tickets and fine individuals who are "repeat offenders" who do not adhere to the prohibition of gatherings of more than 10 people and overall lack of compliance with the State's Stay-at-Home order.[141][142]

Village of Peoria HeightsEdit

In Peoria Heights an employee of a gas station was fired after posting a sign refusing to serve customers who wore masks.[143][144]

School closuresEdit

On March 9, Loyola Academy in Wilmette canceled classes due to potential exposure of a student to the virus.[145]

In the following days, several universities in Illinois closed or cancelled classes. Northwestern University extended its spring break by one week, after which classes would be held remotely rather than on campus.[32] The University of Illinois and Northern Illinois University took similar measures, adding that residence and dining halls would remain open.[33]

Many more Illinois schools, both public and private, announced closures in the following days, including the Archdiocese of Chicago. When Chicago Public Schools did not announce a closure, the Chicago Teachers Union demanded that the district close its schools immediately.[146] On March 13 Governor Pritzker announced that all schools in the state would be closed between March 17 and 30, and later extended to at least April 8.[36][147] On March 19 Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot announced that Chicago Public Schools will remain closed until Tuesday, April 21, 2020.[148] On March 31, Governor Pritzker extended the statewide school closures until April 30.[149] On April 17, Governor Prizker announced that all schools in the state will stay closed for the remainder of the school year.[150]

Socio-economic impactEdit

Economic impactEdit

 
Navy Pier, closed on March 22, 2020
 
Empty shelves due to panic buying in a Jewel supermarket in Lincoln Square, Chicago

From March 16 until May 6, American Airlines, which has a major hub at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, will suspend long haul international flights, reducing its international capacity by 75%.[151]

Chicago's Navy Pier announced that it will be closed to the public until April 2.[152][153]

On March 15, Pritzker ordered all bars and restaurant dining rooms to close from March 17 to 30 to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus affecting the state.[7]

United Airlines, whose primary hub is at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, canceled 95% of its international flights in response to the pandemic starting in April.[154] United reported a $2.1 billion loss in the first quarter of 2020, blaming restrictions on the aviation industry due to the coronavirus pandemic.[155]

Racial inequalityEdit

In early April, a number of news organizations analyzed data provided by the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office, and the Chicago Department of Public Health showing that African Americans experienced a disproportionately higher death rate due to the virus.[156][157][158] African Americans accounted for 42% of coronavirus-related deaths and 30% of confirmed cases statewide, despite only comprising 14% of the state's population.[156] In Cook County, African Americans accounted for 58% of deaths while comprising 23% of the population.[157] A similar pattern emerged in the city of Chicago, where 72% of deaths and 53% of confirmed cases affected African Americans, who make up 30% of the city's population.[159] On April 16, the Cook County government launched a dashboard with regularly updated information on coronavirus-related deaths, disaggregated by race.[160]

On April 6, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced a plan to address the racially disproportionate impact of COVID-19, proposing surveillance of grocery and corner stores, increase bus service to the city's South and West sides, and a "racial equity rapid-response team."[161][162] On April 9, a group of progressive African American activists and elected officials (including Chicago Alderwoman Jeanette Taylor, Cook County Board Commissioner Brandon Johnson, and Illinois House Rep. Sonya Harper) called for a range of policy reforms to address this racial inequality. Their demands included a rent and mortgage holiday, a freeze on utility payments, increases in paid sick leave and hazard pay, an end to cash bonds.[163][162] They also called for a stop to the use of the pandemic as an “excuse to double-down on racist policing,” reporting that residents of heavily black neighborhoods in Chicago were being told about a 5pm curfew and being ticketed and detained for being outside.[162]

Cultural impactEdit

Impact on sportsEdit

Most of state's sports teams were affected. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on March 12, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the Chicago White Sox and Chicago Cubs.[164] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association suspended the season for 30 days, affecting the Chicago Bulls.[165] Also on that date, the National Hockey League, suspended the season indefinitely, affecting the Chicago Blackhawks.[166] Also on March 12, Major League Soccer suspended the season for 30 days, affecting the Chicago Fire FC.[167] On April 3, the Women's National Basketball Association announced that the beginning of the season originally scheduled for May 15 would be delayed indefinitely, affecting the Chicago Sky.[168]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments on March 12, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[169] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[170] Also on March 12, the Illinois High School Association announced the cancellation of most remaining winter State Series postseason tournaments, with basketball being the main activity affected.[171]

Light showsEdit

In Chicago's South Loop district, light-shows became a regular daily event at 8pm every day by mid-April.[172]

StatisticsEdit

County[a] Cases[b] Deaths Recov.[c] Pop (2012) cases/100k Ref.[d][173]
99 / 102 96,485 4,234 3,237 12,830,632 751.16
Adams 42 1 37 67,103 62.59 [174]
Alexander 8 0 6 8,238 97.11 [175][176]
Bond 11 1 6 17,768 61.91 [177][178]
Boone 307 14 130 54,165 566.79 [179]
Brown 11 0 6,937 158.57 [180]
Bureau 15 1 6 34,978 42.88 [181][182]
Calhoun 1 0 1 5,089 19.65 [183][184]
Carroll 14 2 9 15,387 90.99 [185][186]
Cass 64 0 30 13,642 469.14 [187]
Champaign 515 7 301 201,081 234.73 [188]
Christian 32 4 34,800 91.95 [e] [189][190][191]
Clark 9 0 6 16,335 55.10 [192][193]
Clay 2 0 13,815 14.48 [194][195]
Clinton 161 14 48 37,762 426.35 [196]
Coles 85 5 22 53,873 157.78 [197][198]
Cook 63,690 2,889 247 5,194,675 1,226.06 [f][g][199][200][201][202][203][204]
Crawford 11 0 10 19,817 55.51 [205][206]
Cumberland 9 0 4 11,048 81.46 [207][208]
DeKalb 262 2 105,160 249.14 [209]
DeWitt 4 0 3 16,561 24.15 [210]
Douglas 26 0 19,980 130.13 [211][212][213]
DuPage 6,076 300 916,924 662.65 [214]
Edgar 0 0 18,576 0 [215][216]
Edwards 2 0 6,721 29.76 [217]
Effingham 6 1 4 34,242 17.52 [218]
Fayette 19 2 13 22,140 85.82 [219][220]
Ford 18 1 11 14,081 127.83 [221][222]
Franklin 11 0 8 39,561 27.81 [223]
Fulton 8 0 3 37,069 21.58 [224]
Gallatin 2 0 2 5,589 35.78 [225]
Greene 4 0 13,886 28.81 [226][227][228]
Grundy 75 1 40 50,063 149.81 [229]
Hamilton 2 0 8,457 23.65 [230][231]
Hancock 13 0 7 19,104 68.05 [232][233]
Hardin 1 0 1 4,320 23.15 [175][176]
Henderson 8 0 2 7,331 109.13 [234][235]
Henry 65 0 16 50,486 128.75 [236][237][238]
Iroquois 118 3 34 29,718 397.07 [239]
Jackson 234 10 171 60,218 300.57 [240]
Jasper 45 7 35 9,698 464.01 [241][242]
Jefferson 99 17 77 38,827 254.98 [243][244]
Jersey 19 1 10 22,985 82.66 [245][246]
Jo Daviess 19 0 22,678 83.78 [247]
Johnson 7 0 4 12,582 55.64 [175][176]
Kane 4,584 115 515,269 889.63 [248]
Kankakee 673 31 204 113,449 593.22 [249]
Kendall 579 18 265 114,736 504.64 [250]
Knox 89 0 52,919 168.18 [251]
Lake 6,645 215 703,462 944.61 [252]
LaSalle 121 8 51 113,924 106.21 [253]
Lawrence 4 0 3 16,833 23.76 [254][255]
Lee 74 1 0 36,031 205.38 [256]
Livingston 27 1 23 38,950 69.32 [257]
Logan 10 0 7 30,305 33.00 [258]
Macon 169 17 54 110,768 152.57 [259]
Macoupin 41 1 28 47,765 85.84 [260][261]
Madison 493 42 224 269,282 183.08 [262]
Marion 48 0 35 39,437 121.71 [263][264]
Marshall 5 0 1 12,640 39.56 [181][182]
Mason 16 0 13 14,666 109.10 [265]
Massac 6 0 5 15,429 38.89 [175][176]
McDonough 64 2 24 32,612 196.25 [266][267]
McHenry 1,209 62 308,760 391.57 [268]
McLean 186 6 104 169,572 109.69 [269]
Menard 17 0 2 12,705 133.81 [270]
Mercer 14 0 10 16,434 85.19 [271]
Monroe 89 11 32,957 270.05
Montgomery 39 1 30,104 129.55 [190][272]
Morgan 36 1 35,547 101.27 [273]
Moultrie 8 0 14,846 53.89 [274]
Ogle 172 2 101 53,497 321.51 [275]
Peoria 160 6 112 186,494 85.79 [276]
Perry 39 0 29 22,350 174.50 [277]
Piatt 9 0 6 16,729 53.80 [210]
Pike 1 0 16,430 6.09 [278]
Pope 1 0 1 4,470 22.37 [175][176]
Pulaski 40 0 18 6,161 649.25 [175][176]
Putnam 1 0 6,006 16.65 [181]
Randolph 237 3 170 33,476 707.97 [279]
Richland 3 0 3 16,233 18.48 [280]
Rock Island 590 18 147,546 399.88 [281]
Saline 6 0 5 24,913 24.08 [225]
Sangamon 309 25 136 197,465 156.48 [270]
Schuyler 7 0 7,544 92.79 [282]
Scott 0 0 5,355 0
Shelby 13 1 9 22,363 58.13 [283]
St. Clair 815 66 270,056 301.79 [284]
Stark 2 0 5,994 33.37 [236][235]
Stephenson 156 1 65 47,711 326.97 [285]
Tazewell 63 3 14 135,394 46.53 [286]
Union 122 4 16 17,808 685.09 [175][176]
Vermilion 31 1 17 81,625 37.98 [287]
Wabash 1 0 11,947 8.37 [288]
Warren 109 0 77 17,707 615.58 [289]
Washington 17 0 14 14,716 115.52 [290]
Wayne 9 1 2 16,760 53.70 [225]
White 2 0 2 14,665 13.64 [225]
Whiteside 123 8 73 58,498 210.26 [291][292]
Will 4,455 240 677,560 657.51 [293]
Williamson 52 1 36 66,357 78.36 [223]
Winnebago 1,537 37 327 295,266 520.55 [294]
Woodford 16 1 13 38,664 41.38 [295]
Unassigned County 74 1 [h]
Non-Resident 87 1
Updated May 18, 2020
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case reside, not where they were diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported confirmed cases. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ "–" denotes that no data is currently available for that county, not that the value is zero. IDPH is not providing up-to-date recovered case numbers. Local health departments could be providing this information at their discretion.
  4. ^ All counties assumed to use the IDPH official totals unless additionally referenced by county health department data.
  5. ^ County Health Department is not providing recovery numbers to the public.
  6. ^ Reported on February 15, 2020 by IDPH and no further information has been provided since. 2 reported.
  7. ^ Reported by Village of Skokie, Illinois 245 reported.
  8. ^ These numbers are published by IDPH and are cases or deaths which have not been assigned to a county yet.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Number includes confirmed COVID cases along with persons under investigation (PUI) admitted into hospitals.
  2. ^ The Illinois Department of Public Health has not released data on the number of recovered cases since confirming the first two on February 15, 2020.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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