Adolphus Jones

Adolphus "Dolly" Jones (born 24 July 1984)[nb] is a Kittitian and Nevisian track and field athlete and soccer player.

Adolphus Jones
Personal information
Full nameAdolphus Bentos Jones
Nickname(s)Dolly
Born (1984-07-24) 24 July 1984 (age 37)
Basseterre, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Years active2002–present
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Sport
Country Saint Kitts and Nevis
SportAthletics, soccer
Event(s)Decathlon, goalkeeper
College teamUT Arlington Mavericks
ClubFLOW 4G Cayon Rockets
Updated on 28 December 2014.

In the decathlon he competed for his native country at the 2007 Pan American Games, the 2010 Commonwealth Games, and the Central American and Caribbean Championships in Athletics in 2008 and 2009. He holds several Saint Kitts and Nevis records in athletics, including 7258 points in the decathlon and 5475 points for the indoor heptathlon.

He played as goalkeeper for the Saint Kitts and Nevis national football team in two matches for the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifiers.

CareerEdit

Early lifeEdit

Born in Basseterre, he began taking part in both athletics and soccer as a teenager.[citation needed] At the 2003 Leeward Islands Junior Championships in Athletics he competed in a variety of events, winning medals in the 800 metres, high jump, long jump, triple jump and javelin throw.[1] He entered the 800 m and 1500 metres at the 2003 CARIFTA Games, placing sixth and seventeenth, respectively.[2]

He was selected for the Saint Kitts and Nevis national football team in 2004 and was the goalkeeper for two of their games in the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifiers. In November that year, he conceded thirteen goals over two matches against Mexico.[3][4] He had better outings in the 2005 Caribbean Cup qualifiers, keeping a clean sheet in a 2–0 win against Antigua and Barbuda and winning 6–1 against Montserrat, although the team lost to Haiti by a goal to nil.[5]

Senior competitionEdit

In 2006, he began studying at Paul Quinn College in Texas, United States. He competed athletically for the school in track events, as well as soccer.[6] In his first year there he finished fourth in the high jump at the NAIA national men's outdoor track and field championship, setting a school record and Saint Kitts and Nevis national record of 2.08 m (6 ft 9+34 in).[7] He competed at July's 2006 NACAC Under-23 Championships in Athletics, where he jumped a height of 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) for tenth place. Later that month he made his senior debut international performance in track and field, running in the 800 m heats and placing twelfth in the high jump at the 2006 Central American and Caribbean Games.[8] Two further outings came in 2007, both in July. First, he made his decathlon debut at the 2007 NACAC Championships, coming second with 6092 points to Darwin Colón in a two-man contest.[9] The following week both men entered the decathlon at the 2007 Pan American Games, although Jones failed to complete all ten events. He also ran with the 4×400 m relay team in the heat stages.[8]

Jones gave two national record performances in 2008, having a high jump best of 2.11 m (6 ft 11 in) and a decathlon best of 6852 points. His high jump mark came in the decathlon competition at the 2008 Central American and Caribbean Championships in Athletics, which he failed to finish. He enrolled at The University of Texas at Arlington, majoring in interdisciplinary studies. Competing on the Texas-Arlington Mavericks team, he scored 5146 points in the indoor heptathlon at the Southland Conference Indoor Championships[10] Outdoors he scored a best of 6980 points at the Texas Relays before setting a national record mark of 7178 points for fourth at the Southland Conference Outdoor Championships. His third and last decathlon outing that year was at the 2009 Central American and Caribbean Championships in Athletics, where he came seventh with 6774 points in total. In the individual events he set seven personal bests outdoors, including national records in the 110 metres hurdles (15.19 seconds) and the pole vault (4.25 m (13 ft 11+14 in)).[8]

2010 Commonwealth GamesEdit

Working with track coach Eric Francis, who grew up in Saint Kitts,[11] he opened his 2010 indoor season with a 5532-point heptathlon at the Iowa State Track and Field Classic (on an oversized track not suitable for record purposes).[12] Following this he set a series of national indoor records at the Southland Conference meet: he ran 8.46 seconds for the 60 m hurdles, recorded 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) in the high jump, 4.45 m (14 ft 7 in) in the pole vault, and a total of 5475 points in the heptathlon. His sole major outdoor performance that year saw him improve his decathlon national record to 7258 points, which was enough for seventh place at the 2010 Commonwealth Games and included a 110 m hurdles national record of 14.89 seconds. He was the highest rankings Caribbean athlete in the event.[13] Despite this result, he ceased competing internationally that year.[8]

He returned to Saint Kitts and became involved with Garden Hotspurs FC, a Basseterre soccer club, and played for the team as well as being appointed as club Vice President in 2013.[14][15]

Personal bestsEdit

Outdoor
Indoor

International competition recordEdit

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
Representing   Saint Kitts and Nevis
2002 Leeward Islands Junior Championships (U20) Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands 5th 800m 2:15.12
2003 CARIFTA Games (U-20) Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago 6th 800 metres 1:56.81
17th 1500 metres 4:30.61
Leeward Islands Junior Championships (U20) Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands 4th 400 m 52.80
3rd 800 m 2:12.83
2nd High jump 1.90 m
3rd Long jump 6.42 m (wind: NWI)
2nd Triple jump 12.99 m (wind: NWI)
5th Discus 26.90 m
2nd Javelin 39.84 m
2006 NACAC Under-23 Championships Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic 10th High jump 2.05 m
Central American and Caribbean Games Cartagena, Colombia 17th (heats) 800 m 1:59.59
12th High jump 1.95 m
2007 NACAC Championships San Salvador, El Salvador 2nd Decathlon 6092 pts
Pan American Games Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Decathlon DNF
9th (heats) 4×400 m relay]] 3:21.77
2008 Central American and Caribbean Championships Cali, Colombia Decathlon DNF
2009 Central American and Caribbean Championships Havana, Cuba 5th Decathlon 6774 pts
2010 Commonwealth Games New Delhi, India 7th Decathlon 7258 pts
2014 Central American and Caribbean Games Xalapa, México 7th Decathlon 6315 pts A

NotesEdit

  • nb Some sources list his birthday as 29 January 1984.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2003 LEEWARD ISLANDS TRACK & FIELD JUNIOR CHAMPIONSHIP. Nevis Amateur Athletic Association. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  2. ^ CARIFTA Games 2003 Archived 20 December 2013 at the Wayback Machine. World Junior Athletics History. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  3. ^ Adolphus JONES[dead link]. FIFA. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  4. ^ Con paso impresionante (in Spanish). ESPN. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  5. ^ Courtney, Barrie (2005-02-02). 2004 MATCHES NORTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN. Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  6. ^ Paul Quinn College vs University of Dallas (26 September 2008). NEAC Sports. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  7. ^ NAIA Outdoor Track & Field Championships - 5/25/2006 to 5/27/2006 . CFPI Timing and Data. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  8. ^ a b c d Adolphus Jones. Tilastopaja. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  9. ^ I NACAC Senior T&F Championships Archived 2011-07-24 at the Wayback Machine. Revsys Siada. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  10. ^ Adolphus Jones. UT Arlington Mavericks. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  11. ^ Coach Francis Archived 13 April 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Pacesetters. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  12. ^ Haas, Ryan (2010-02-14). Jones breaks national heptathlon record at US meet. SKNVibes. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  13. ^ Creque, Suelika (2011-01-13). SKNAAA PRO says 2011 Athletics Calendar bears the fruits of 2010’s labour. SKN Vibes. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  14. ^ New Executive Committee Selected. Garden Hotspurs (2013-10-09). Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  15. ^ Season Opening Draw . Garden Hotspurs (2013-03-21). Retrieved on 2014-04-10.
  16. ^ Adolphus JONES Archived 13 April 2014 at the Wayback Machine. AthleCac. Retrieved on 2014-04-10.

External linksEdit