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The 2009–10 UEFA Champions League was the 55th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 18th under the current UEFA Champions League format. The final was played on 22 May 2010, at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, home of Real Madrid, in Madrid, Spain.[1] The final was won by Italian club Inter Milan, who beat German side Bayern Munich 2–0. Internazionale went on to represent Europe in the 2010 FIFA Club World Cup, beating Congolese side TP Mazembe 3–0 in the final, and played in the 2010 UEFA Super Cup against Europa League winners Atlético Madrid, losing 2–0.

2009–10 UEFA Champions League
Santiago Bernabeu Stadium - panoramio.jpg
Tournament details
Dates30 June 2009 – 22 May 2010
Teams32 (group stage)
76 (total) (from 52 associations)
Final positions
ChampionsItaly Internazionale (3rd title)
Runners-upGermany Bayern Munich
Tournament statistics
Matches played125
Goals scored318 (2.54 per match)
Attendance5,193,947 (41,552 per match)
Top scorer(s)Argentina Lionel Messi (8 goals)

Barcelona were the defending champions, but were eliminated by eventual winners Internazionale in the semi-finals.[2][3]

Contents

Association team allocationEdit

A total of 76 teams participated in the 2009–10 Champions League, from 52 UEFA associations (Liechtenstein organises no domestic league competition). Associations are allocated places according to their 2008 UEFA country coefficient, which takes into account their performance in European competitions from 2003–04 to 2007–08.[4]

Below is the qualification scheme for the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League:[5]

  • Associations 1–3 each have four teams qualify
  • Associations 4–6 each have three teams qualify
  • Associations 7–15 each have two teams qualify
  • Associations 16–53 each have one team qualify (except Liechtenstein)

Association rankingEdit

Rank Association Coeff. Teams
1   England 75.749 4
2   Spain 75.266
3   Italy 60.410
4   France 52.668 3
5   Germany 48.722
6   Russia 43.750
7   Romania 40.599 2
8   Portugal 39.927
9   Netherlands 38.213
10   Scotland 33.375
11   Turkey 31.725
12   Ukraine 30.100
13   Belgium 26.700
14   Greece 25.831
15   Czech Republic 25.750
16   Switzerland 24.225 1
17   Bulgaria 23.166
18   Norway 22.425
Rank Association Coeff. Teams
19   Denmark 20.450 1
20   Austria 17.700
21   Serbia 16.750
22   Israel 15.750
23   Sweden 13.691
24   Slovakia 12.332
25   Poland 12.041
26   Hungary 11.999
27   Croatia 11.624
28   Cyprus 10.082
29   Slovenia 9.915
30   Finland 9.623
31   Latvia 8.831
32   Bosnia and Herzegovina 8.498
33   Lithuania 7.999
34   Moldova 7.499
35   Republic of Ireland 7.332
36   Macedonia 6.331
Rank Association Coeff. Teams
37   Iceland 5.999 1
38   Georgia 5.831
39   Liechtenstein 5.500 0
40   Belarus 5.332 1
41   Estonia 4.332
42   Azerbaijan 3.832
43   Albania 3.666
44   Armenia 3.665
45   Kazakhstan 2.582
46   Northern Ireland 2.332
47   Wales 2.331
48   Faroe Islands 1.832
49   Luxembourg 1.498
50   Malta 0.832
51   Montenegro 0.500
52   Andorra 0.500
53   San Marino 0.250

DistributionEdit

Since the winners of the 2008–09 UEFA Champions League, Barcelona, obtained a place in the group stage through their domestic league placing, the reserved title holder spot in the group stage was effectively vacated. To compensate:[6]

  • The champions of association 13 (Belgium) were promoted from the third qualifying round to the group stage.
  • The champions of association 16 (Switzerland) were promoted from the second qualifying round to the third qualifying round.
  • The champions of associations 48 and 49 (Faroe Islands and Luxembourg) were promoted from the first qualifying round to the second qualifying round.
Teams entering in this round Teams advancing from previous round
First qualifying round
(4 teams)
  • 4 champions from associations 50–53
Second qualifying round
(34 teams)
  • 32 champions from associations 17–49 (except Liechtenstein)
  • 2 winners from the first qualifying round
Third qualifying round Champions
(20 teams)
  • 3 champions from associations 14–16
  • 17 winners from the second qualifying round
Non-champions
(10 teams)
  • 9 runners-up from associations 7–15
  • 1 third-placed team from association 6
Play-off round Champions
(10 teams)
  • 10 winners from the third qualifying round for champions
Non-champions
(10 teams)
  • 2 third-placed teams from associations 4 and 5
  • 3 fourth-placed teams from associations 1–3
  • 5 winners from the third qualifying round for non-champions
Group stage
(32 teams)
  • 13 champions from associations 1–13
  • 6 runners-up from associations 1–6
  • 3 third-placed teams from associations 1–3
  • 5 winners from the play-off round for champions
  • 5 winners from the play-off round for non-champions
Knockout phase
(16 teams)
  • 8 group winners from the group stage
  • 8 group runners-up from the group stage

TeamsEdit

League positions of the previous season shown in parentheses.[7]

Group stage
  BarcelonaTH (1st)   Internazionale (1st)   Bayern Munich (2nd)   AZ (1st)
  Manchester United (1st)   Juventus (2nd)   Rubin Kazan (1st)   Rangers (1st)
  Liverpool (2nd)   Milan (3rd)   CSKA Moscow (2nd)   Beşiktaş (1st)
  Chelsea (3rd)   Bordeaux (1st)   Unirea Urziceni (1st)   Dynamo Kyiv (1st)
  Real Madrid (2nd)   Marseille (2nd)   Porto (1st)   Standard Liège (1st)
  Sevilla (3rd)   Wolfsburg (1st)
Play-off round
Champions Non-champions
  Arsenal (4th)   Fiorentina (4th)   Stuttgart (3rd)
  Atlético Madrid (4th)   Lyon (3rd)
Third qualifying round
Champions Non-champions
  Olympiacos (1st)   Dynamo Moscow (3rd)   Celtic (2nd)   Anderlecht (2nd)
  Slavia Prague (1st)   Timișoara (2nd)   Sivasspor (2nd)   Panathinaikos (2nd)
  Zürich (1st)   Sporting CP (2nd)   Shakhtar Donetsk (2nd)   Sparta Prague (2nd)
  Twente (2nd)
Second qualifying round
  Levski Sofia (1st)   Wisła Kraków (1st)   Ekranas (1st)   Baku (1st)
  Stabæk (1st)   Debrecen (1st)   Sheriff Tiraspol (1st)   Tirana (1st)
  Copenhagen (1st)   Dinamo Zagreb (1st)   Bohemians (1st)   Pyunik (1st)
  Red Bull Salzburg (1st)   APOEL (1st)   Makedonija (1st)   Aktobe (1st)
  Partizan (1st)   Maribor (1st)   FH (1st)   Glentoran (1st)
  Maccabi Haifa (1st)   Inter Turku (1st)   WIT Georgia (1st)   Rhyl (1st)
  Kalmar FF (1st)   Ventspils (1st)   BATE Borisov (1st)   EB/Streymur (1st)
  Slovan Bratislava (1st)   Zrinjski (1st)   Levadia (1st)   F91 Dudelange (1st)
First qualifying round
  Hibernians (1st)   Mogren (1st)   Sant Julià (1st)   Tre Fiori (1st)

TH Title Holder

Round and draw datesEdit

All draws held at UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland unless stated otherwise.[6]

Phase Round Draw date First leg Second leg
Qualifying First qualifying round 22 June 2009 30 June–1 July 2009 7–8 July 2009
Second qualifying round 14–15 July 2009 21–22 July 2009
Third qualifying round 17 July 2009 28–29 July 2009 4–5 August 2009
Play-off Play-off round 7 August 2009 18–19 August 2009 25–26 August 2009
Group stage Matchday 1 27 August 2009
(Monaco)
15–16 September 2009
Matchday 2 29–30 September 2009
Matchday 3 20–21 October 2009
Matchday 4 3–4 November 2009
Matchday 5 24–25 November 2009
Matchday 6 8–9 December 2009
Knockout phase Round of 16 18 December 2009 16–17 & 23–24 February 2010 9–10 & 16–17 March 2010
Quarter-finals 19 March 2010 30–31 March 2010 6–7 April 2010
Semi-finals 20–21 April 2010 27–28 April 2010
Final 22 May 2010 at Santiago Bernabéu Stadium, Madrid

Qualifying phaseEdit

In a new system for the Champions League, there are two separate qualifying tournaments.[8] The Champions Path (which start from the first qualifying round) is for clubs which won their domestic league and did not automatically qualify for the group stage, while the Non-Champions Path (which start from the third qualifying round) is for clubs which did not win their domestic league and did not automatically qualify for the group stage.

In the qualifying phase and the play-off round, teams play against each other over two legs on a home-and-away basis.

The draw for the first and second qualifying rounds, conducted by UEFA President Michel Platini and UEFA General Secretary David Taylor, was held on 22 June 2009, and the draw for the third qualifying round, conducted by UEFA Competitions Director Giorgio Marchetti and Head of Club Competitions Michael Heselschwerdt, was held on 17 July 2009. For the draws, clubs were separated into seeded and unseeded teams based on their club coefficient. Because the draws for the second and third qualifying rounds took place before the previous round was completed, the teams were seeded assuming the seeded side in the previous round would be victorious.

First qualifying roundEdit

The first legs were played on 30 June and 1 July, and the second legs were played on 7 and 8 July 2009.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Tre Fiori   2–2 (4–5 p)1   Sant Julià 1–1 1–1 (aet)
Hibernians   0–6   Mogren 0–2 0–4
Notes
  • Note 1: Sant Julià was originally drawn to play the first leg at home, but the tie was switched so that Tre Fiori would host the first leg.

Second qualifying roundEdit

The first legs were played on 14 and 15 July, and the second legs were played on 21 and 22 July 2009.

Partizan's 8–0 win over Rhyl in the second leg equalled the record for the largest margin of victory in the current Champions League format.

As of November 2009, the second leg between Stabæk and Tirana was under investigation by UEFA and German authorities for possible match-fixing.[9]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Tirana   1–5   Stabæk 1–1 0–4
WIT Georgia   1–3   Maribor 0–0 1–3
EB/Streymur   0–5   APOEL 0–2 0–3
Copenhagen   12–0   Mogren 6–0 6–0
Debrecen   3–3 (a)   Kalmar FF 2–0 1–3
Makedonija Gjorče Petrov   0–4   BATE Borisov 0–2 0–2
FH   0–6   Aktobe 0–4 0–2
Pyunik Yerevan   0–3   Dinamo Zagreb 0–0 0–3
Ventspils   6–1   F91 Dudelange 3–0 3–1
Ekranas   4–6   Baku 2–2 2–4
Red Bull Salzburg   2–1   Bohemians 1–1 1–0
Zrinjski   1–4   Slovan Bratislava 1–0 0–4
Inter Turku   0–2   Sheriff Tiraspol 0–1 0–1
Rhyl   0–12   Partizan 0–4 0–8
Wisła Kraków   1–2   Levadia 1–1 0–1
Levski Sofia   9–0   Sant Julià 4–0 5–0
Maccabi Haifa   10–0   Glentoran 6–0 4–0

Third qualifying roundEdit

The third qualifying round was split into two separate sections: one for champions and one for non-champions. The first legs were played on 28 and 29 July, and the second legs were played on 4 and 5 August 2009. The losing teams in both sections entered the play-off round of the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Champions Path
Red Bull Salzburg   3–2   Dinamo Zagreb 1–1 2–1
Slovan Bratislava   0–4   Olympiacos 0–2 0–2
Zürich   5–3   Maribor 2–3 3–0
APOEL   2–1   Partizan 2–0 0–1
Sheriff Tiraspol   1–1 (a)   Slavia Prague 0–0 1–1
Aktobe   3–4   Maccabi Haifa 0–0 3–4
Baku   0–2   Levski Sofia 0–0 0–2
Ventspils   2–2 (a)   BATE Borisov 1–0 1–2
Levadia   0–2   Debrecen 0–1 0–1
Copenhagen   3–1   Stabæk 3–1 0–0
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Non-Champions Path
Sparta Prague   3–4   Panathinaikos 3–1 0–3
Shakhtar Donetsk   2–2 (a)   Timișoara 2–2 0–0
Sporting CP   1–1 (a)   Twente 0–0 1–1
Celtic   2–1   Dynamo Moscow 0–1 2–0
Anderlecht   6–3   Sivasspor 5–0 1–3

Play-off roundEdit

An extra qualifying round, the play-off round, was introduced from this season. The teams were split into two separate sections: one for champions and one for non-champions. The draw for the play-off round, conducted by UEFA General Secretary David Taylor and UEFA Competitions Director Giorgio Marchetti, was held on 7 August 2009. For the draw, clubs were separated into seeded and unseeded teams based on their club coefficient. The first legs were played on 18 and 19 August, and the second legs were played on 25 and 26 August 2009. The losing teams in both sections entered the group stage of the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Champions Path
Sheriff Tiraspol   0–3   Olympiacos 0–2 0–1
Red Bull Salzburg   1–5   Maccabi Haifa 1–2 0–3
Ventspils   1–5   Zürich 0–3 1–2
Copenhagen   2–3   APOEL 1–0 1–3
Levski Sofia   1–4   Debrecen 1–2 0–2
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Non-Champions Path
Lyon   8–2   Anderlecht 5–1 3–1
Celtic   1–5   Arsenal 0–2 1–3
Timișoara   0–2   Stuttgart 0–2 0–0
Sporting CP   3–3 (a)   Fiorentina 2–2 1–1
Panathinaikos   2–5   Atlético Madrid 2–3 0–2

Group stageEdit

Location of teams of the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League group stage.
  Brown: Group A;   Red: Group B;   Orange: Group C;   Yellow: Group D;
  Green: Group E;   Blue: Group F;   Purple: Group G;   Pink: Group H.

The draw for the group stage was held at the Grimaldi Forum in Monaco on 27 August 2009. A total of 32 teams were drawn into eight groups of four. Teams were divided into four pots, based on their club coefficient. Clubs from the same pot or the same association cannot be drawn into the same group.

In each group, teams played against each other home-and-away. The matchdays were 15–16 September, 29–30 September, 20–21 October, 3–4 November, 24–25 November, and 8–9 December 2009. The top two in each group advanced to the knockout phase, and the third-placed teams entered the round of 32 of the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League.

Based on Article 7.06 in the UEFA regulations, if two or more teams are equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following criteria are applied to determine the rankings:[5]

  1. higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. superior goal difference from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. higher number of goals scored away from home in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. superior goal difference from all group matches played;
  5. higher number of goals scored;
  6. higher number of coefficient points accumulated by the club in question, as well as its association, over the previous five seasons.

AZ, Wolfsburg, Standard Liège, Zürich, APOEL, Rubin Kazan, Unirea Urziceni and Debrecen made their debut in the group stage. [10]

Key to colours in group tables
Group winners and runners-up advance to the round of 16
Third-placed teams enter the UEFA Europa League at the round of 32

Group AEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts BDX BAY JUV MHA
  Bordeaux 6 5 1 0 9 2 +7 16 2–1 2–0 1–0
  Bayern Munich 6 3 1 2 9 5 +4 10 0–2 0–0 1–0
  Juventus 6 2 2 2 4 7 −3 8 1–1 1–4 1–0
  Maccabi Haifa 6 0 0 6 0 8 −8 0[a] 0–1 0–3 0–1
Source:[citation needed]
Notes:
  1. ^ Maccabi Haifa was the first club to finish the Champions League group stage with 0 wins, 0 goals and 0 points.

Group BEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts MU CSK WOL BJK
  Manchester United 6 4 1 1 10 6 +4 13 3–3 2–1 0–1
  CSKA Moscow 6 3 1 2 10 10 0 10 0–1 2–1 2–1
  Wolfsburg 6 2 1 3 9 8 +1 7 1–3 3–1 0–0
  Beşiktaş 6 1 1 4 3 8 −5 4 0–1 1–2 0–3

Group CEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts RM MIL OM ZÜR
  Real Madrid 6 4 1 1 15 7 +8 13 2–3 3–0 1–0
  Milan 6 2 3 1 8 7 +1 9 1–1 1–1 0–1
  Marseille 6 2 1 3 10 10 0 7 1–3 1–2 6–1
  Zürich 6 1 1 4 5 14 −9 4 2–5 1–1 0–1

Group DEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts CHE POR ATL APO
  Chelsea 6 4 2 0 11 4 +7 14 1–0 4–0 2–2
  Porto 6 4 0 2 8 3 +5 12 0–1 2–0 2–1
  Atlético Madrid 6 0 3 3 3 12 −9 3 2–2 0–3 0–0
  APOEL 6 0 3 3 4 7 −3 3 0–1 0–1 1–1

Group EEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts FIO OL LIV DEB
  Fiorentina 6 5 0 1 14 7 +7 15 1–0 2–0 5–2
  Lyon 6 4 1 1 12 3 +9 13 1–0 1–1 4–0
  Liverpool 6 2 1 3 5 7 −2 7 1–2 1–2 1–0
  Debrecen 6 0 0 6 5 19 −14 0 3–4 0–4 0–1

Group FEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts BAR INT RUB DK
  Barcelona 6 3 2 1 7 3 +4 11 2–0 1–2 2–0
  Internazionale 6 2 3 1 7 6 +1 9 0–0 2–0 2–2
  Rubin Kazan 6 1 3 2 4 7 −3 6 0–0 1–1 0–0
  Dynamo Kyiv 6 1 2 3 7 9 −2 5 1–2 1–2 3–1

Group GEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts SEV STU URZ RAN
  Sevilla 6 4 1 1 11 4 +7 13 1–1 2–0 1–0
  Stuttgart 6 2 3 1 9 7 +2 9 1–3 3–1 1–1
  Unirea Urziceni 6 2 2 2 8 8 0 8 1–0 1–1 1–1
  Rangers 6 0 2 4 4 13 −9 2 1–4 0–2 1–4

Group HEdit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts ARS OLY STD AZ
  Arsenal 6 4 1 1 12 5 +7 13 2–0 2–0 4–1
  Olympiacos 6 3 1 2 4 5 −1 10 1–0 2–1 1–0
  Standard Liège 6 1 2 3 7 9 −2 5 2–3 2–0 1–1
  AZ 6 0 4 2 4 8 −4 4 1–1 0–0 1–1

Knockout phaseEdit

In the knockout phase, teams play against each other over two legs on a home-and-away basis, except for the one-match final.

The draw for the round of 16 was held on 18 December 2009, conducted by UEFA General Secretary Gianni Infantino and Giorgio Marchetti, the UEFA Director of Competitions.[11] The eight group winners, which would play the second leg at home, were drawn against the eight group runners-up, with the restriction that teams from the same group or the same association cannot be drawn with each other.

The draws for the quarter-finals, semi-finals and final (to determine the "home" team) was held on 19 March 2010, conducted by Gianni Infantino and Emilio Butragueño, the ambassador for the final in Madrid.[12] From the quarter-finals onwards, there were no seedings, and teams from the same group or the same association may be drawn with each other.

BracketEdit

  Round of 16 Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
                                         
   Bayern Munich (a) 2 2 4  
   Fiorentina 1 3 4  
     Bayern Munich (a) 2 2 4  
     Manchester United 1 3 4  
   Milan 2 0 2
   Manchester United 3 4 7  
     Bayern Munich 1 3 4  
     Lyon 0 0 0  
   Lyon 1 1 2  
   Real Madrid 0 1 1  
     Lyon 3 0 3
     Bordeaux 1 1 2  
   Olympiacos 0 1 1
   Bordeaux 1 2 3  
     Bayern Munich 0
     Internazionale 2
   Internazionale 2 1 3  
   Chelsea 1 0 1  
     Internazionale 1 1 2
     CSKA Moscow 0 0 0  
   CSKA Moscow 1 2 3
   Sevilla 1 1 2  
     Internazionale 3 0 3
     Barcelona 1 1 2  
   Porto 2 0 2  
   Arsenal 1 5 6  
     Arsenal 2 1 3
     Barcelona 2 4 6  
   Stuttgart 1 0 1
   Barcelona 1 4 5  

Round of 16Edit

Starting from this season, the matches in the round of 16 were held over four weeks, instead of the previous two weeks. The first legs were played on 16, 17, 23 and 24 February, and the second legs were played on 9, 10, 16 and 17 March 2010.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Stuttgart   1–5   Barcelona 1–1 0–4
Olympiacos   1–3   Bordeaux 0–1 1–2
Internazionale   3–1   Chelsea 2–1 1–0
Bayern Munich   4–4 (a)   Fiorentina 2–1 2–3
CSKA Moscow   3–2   Sevilla 1–1 2–1
Lyon   2–1   Real Madrid 1–0 1–1
Porto   2–6   Arsenal 2–1 0–5
Milan   2–7   Manchester United 2–3 0–4

Quarter-finalsEdit

The first legs were played on 30 and 31 March, and the second legs were played on 6 and 7 April 2010.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Lyon   3–2   Bordeaux 3–1 0–1
Bayern Munich   (a) 4–4   Manchester United 2–1 2–3
Arsenal   3–6   Barcelona 2–2 1–4
Internazionale   2–0   CSKA Moscow 1–0 1–0

Semi-finalsEdit

The first legs were played on 20 and 21 April, and the second legs were played on 27 and 28 April 2010.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Bayern Munich   4–0   Lyon 1–0 3–0
Internazionale   3–2   Barcelona 3–1 0–1

FinalEdit

The final of the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League was played at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in Madrid on 22 May 2010, between Germany's Bayern Munich and Italy's Internazionale.[13] The stadium, home of Real Madrid, has hosted three previous European Cup finals, in 1957, 1969 and 1980.[14] It was the first time that a UEFA Champions League final has been played on a Saturday night.[15] England's Howard Webb was appointed to referee the Final.[16] The two clubs competing in the Final had each won their domestic league and cup competitions, meaning that the winner became only the sixth club in Europe to have achieved a continental treble, and the first such club from their respective countries. It was also the second consecutive treble, following that of Barcelona in the previous season.

Bayern Munich  0–2  Internazionale
Report Milito   35'70'

StatisticsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Madrid and Hamburg awarded 2010 finals". uefa.com. Union of European Football Association. 28 March 2008. Archived from the original on 31 March 2008. Retrieved 28 March 2008.
  2. ^ Lyon, Sam (28 April 2010). "Barcelona 1-0 Inter Milan (agg 2-3)". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 24 May 2010.
  3. ^ Lyon, Sam (22 May 2010). "Bayern Munich 0–2 Inter Milan". BBC Sport. British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 24 May 2010.
  4. ^ "Country coefficients 2007/08". UEFA.com.
  5. ^ a b "Regulations of the UEFA Champions League 2009/10" (PDF). uefa.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 7 August 2009.
  6. ^ a b "2009/10 Champions League access list and calendar". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 July 2009.
  7. ^ "2009/10 UEFA Champions League list of participants". UEFA.com. 7 September 2009.
  8. ^ "2009/10 Competition format". UEFA. 18 December 2008. Archived from the original on 21 December 2008. Retrieved 18 December 2008.
  9. ^ "UEFA, FAs discuss match-fixing inquiry". UEFA.com. 25 November 2009. Retrieved 12 June 2011.
  10. ^ "Group-stage rivals ready for draw". UEFA.com. 27 August 2009.
  11. ^ "Draws for UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League – Draws for knock-out rounds to be held on 18 December" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 24 November 2009.
  12. ^ Quarter-final, semi-final draws scheduled
  13. ^ Lyon, Sam (21 May 2010). "Battle of the Bernabeu". BBC News. British Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on 24 May 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  14. ^ "El Santiago Bernabéu: guía de Butragueño" (in Spanish). UEFA. 12 May 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  15. ^ Ashby, Kevin (22 May 2010). "Saturday night UEFA Champions League fever". UEFA. Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  16. ^ "Howard Webb will referee the Champions League final". BBC News. British Broadcasting Corporation. 20 May 2010. Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  17. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Assists". UEFA.com. UEFA. Retrieved 15 March 2012.

External linksEdit