List of U.S. presidential campaign slogans

1840–1896Edit

1840Edit

1844Edit

1848Edit

1852Edit

1856Edit

  • "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Speech, Free Men, Fremont" – 1856 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John Fremont
  • "Fremont and freedom" – John Fremont
  • "We'll Buck 'em in '56" – James Buchanan, playing on "Old Buck", the nickname associated with his last name. (Also "We Po'ked 'em in '44, we Pierced 'em in '52, and we'll Buck 'em in '56". See Franklin Pierce, 1852.)

1860Edit

  • "Vote yourself a farm and horses" – Abraham Lincoln, referencing Republican support for a law granting homesteads on the American frontier areas of the West.
  • "Honest old Abe" – Abraham Lincoln
  • "The Union must and shall be preserved!" – Abraham Lincoln
  • "Protection to American industry" – Abraham Lincoln
  • "True to the Union and the Constitution to the last." – Stephen A. Douglas
  • "The champion of popular sovereignty." – Stephen A. Douglas
  • "The Union now and forever" – Stephen A. Douglas
  • The Union and the Constitution" – John Bell (Also "John Bell and the Constitution", and "The Union, the Constitution, and the enforcement of the laws.")

1864Edit

  • "Don't change horses midstream" – Abraham Lincoln
  • "Union, liberty, peace" – Abraham Lincoln
  • "For Union and Constitution" – Abraham Lincoln (Also "The Union and the Constitution")
  • "An honorable, permanent and happy peace." – George B. McClellan

1868Edit

  • "Let Us Have Peace" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Vote as You Shot" – 1868 presidential campaign slogan of Ulysses S. Grant
  • "Peace, Union, and constitutional government." – Horatio Seymour

1872Edit

1876Edit

  • "Tilden and Reform" – Samuel Tilden
  • "Honest Sam Tilden" – Samuel Tilden
  • "Tilden or Blood!" – 1877 slogan of Tilden supporters during conflict that led to the Compromise of 1877
  • "Hayes the true and Wheeler too" – Slogan and campaign song title for Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler, with song adapted from 1840's "Tippecanoe and Tyler too".
  • "The boys in blue vote for Hayes and Wheeler" – Hayes appeal to fellow Union Army veterans.

1884Edit

  • "Rum, Romanism and Rebellion" – Republican attack because of supposed Democratic support for consuming alcoholic beverages, Catholic immigrants, and the Confederacy.
  • "Ma, Ma, where's my Pa?" – Used by James G. Blaine supporters against Grover Cleveland. The slogan referred to the allegation that Cleveland had fathered an illegitimate child. When Cleveland was elected, his supporters added "Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha!"
  • "Burn this letter!" – Cleveland supporters' attack on Blaine's supposed corruption, quoting a line from Blaine correspondence that became public.
  • "Tell the Truth!" – Cleveland's advice to his supporters after the allegations of his illegitimate child came to light.
  • "Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine! The continental liar from the state of Maine!" – Cleveland campaign attack on Blaine's alleged corruption in office.

1888Edit

  • "Rejuvenated Republicanism"[4]Benjamin Harrison
  • "Grandfather's hat fits Ben!"[8]Benjamin Harrison, referring to his grandfather, William Henry Harrison
  • "Unnecessary taxation oppresses industry." – Grover Cleveland
  • "Reduce the tariff on necessaries of life." – Grover Cleveland

1892Edit

  • "Our choice: Cleve and Steve." – Grover Cleveland and Adlai Stevenson
  • "Tariff Reform" – Grover Cleveland
  • "No Force Bill." – Grover Cleveland (To which southern Democrats appended "No Negro Domination!")
  • "Harrison and Protection." – Benjamin Harrison
  • "Protection-Reciprocity-Honest Money." – Benjamin Harrison

1896Edit

1900–1996Edit

1904Edit

1908Edit

1912Edit

1916Edit

  • "America First and America Efficient" – Charles Evans Hughes
  • "He has kept us out of war." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. presidential campaign slogan
  • "He proved the pen mightier than the sword." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in the East, Peace in the West, Thank God for Woodrow Wilson." – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. presidential campaign slogan
  • "War in Europe – Peace in America – God Bless Wilson" – Woodrow Wilson 1916 U.S. presidential campaign slogan

1920Edit

1924Edit

1928Edit

  • "Who but Hoover?" – 1928 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Herbert Hoover.[11]
  • "A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" – Commonly cited version of a claim asserted in a Republican Party flier on behalf of the 1928 U.S. presidential campaign of Herbert Hoover.[12]
  • "Honest. Able. Fearless." – Al Smith
  • "All for 'Al' and 'Al' for All." – Al Smith
  • "Make your wet dreams come true." – Al Smith, referring to his stand in favor of repealing Prohibition.

1932Edit

  • "Happy Days Are Here Again" – 1932 slogan by Democratic presidential candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • "We are turning the corner" – 1932 campaign slogan in the depths of the Great Depression by Republican president Herbert Hoover.

1936Edit

  • "Defeat the New Deal and Its Reckless Spending" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Let's Get Another Deck" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon, using a card game metaphor to answer the "new deal" cards metaphor of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Let's Make It a Landon-Slide" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Life, Liberty, and Landon" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Alfred M. Landon
  • "Remember Hoover!" – 1936 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Forward with Roosevelt" – Franklin Roosevelt

1940Edit

  • "Better A Third Termer than a Third Rater" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "I Want Roosevelt Again!" – Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Willkie for the Millionaires, Roosevelt for the Millions" – Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Carry on with Roosevelt" – Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "No Third Term" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "No Fourth Term Either" – Wendell Willkie
  • "Roosevelt for Ex-President" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell Willkie
  • "There's No Indispensable Man" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "We Want Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie
  • "Win with Willkie" – 1940 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Wendell L. Willkie

1944Edit

  • "Don't swap horses in midstream" – 1944 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Franklin Roosevelt. The slogan was also used by Abraham Lincoln in the 1864 election.
  • "We are going to win this war and the peace that follows" – 1944 campaign slogan in the midst of World War II by Democratic president Franklin D. Roosevelt
  • "Dewey or don't we" – Thomas E. Dewey

1948Edit

1952Edit

1956Edit

  • "I still like Ike" – 1956 U.S presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • "Peace and Prosperity" – 1956 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • "Adlai and Estes – The Bestest" – Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver
  • "The Winning Team" – Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver

1960Edit

  • "A time for greatness 1960" – U.S. presidential campaign theme of John F. Kennedy (Kennedy also used "We Can Do Better" and "Leadership for the 60s").
  • “Peace, Experience, Prosperity” – Richard Nixon's slogan showing his expertise over Kennedy.[15]

1964Edit

  • "All the way with LBJ" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson
  • "In Your Heart, You Know He's Right" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barry Goldwater
  • "In Your Guts, You Know He's Nuts" – 1964 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Lyndon B. Johnson supporters, answering Goldwater's slogan

1968Edit

  • "Some People Talk Change, Others Cause It" – Hubert Humphrey, 1968
  • "This time, vote like your whole world depended on it" – (1968) slogan of Richard Nixon
  • "To Begin Anew..." – Eugene McCarthy 1968[16]
  • "Nixon's the One" – Richard M. Nixon, 1968

1972Edit

  • "Nixon Now" – Richard M. Nixon, 1972[17] (also, "Nixon Now, More than Ever")
  • "Come home, America" – George McGovern, 1972[18]
  • "Acid, Amnesty, and Abortion for All" – 1972 anti-Democratic Party slogan, from a statement made to reporter Bob Novak by Missouri Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (as related in Novak's 2007 memoir, Prince of Darkness)
  • "Dick Nixon Before He Dicks You" – Popular anti-Nixon slogan, 1972[19]
  • "They can't lick our Dick" – Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[20]
  • "Don't change Dicks in the midst of a screw, vote for Nixon in '72" – Popular campaign slogan for Nixon supporters[20]
  • "Unbought and Unbossed" – official campaign slogan for Shirley Chisolm

1976Edit

  • "He's making us proud again" – Gerald Ford
  • "Not Just Peanuts" – Jimmy Carter[4]
  • "A Leader, for a Change" (also "Leaders, for a Change") – Jimmy Carter
  • "Why not the Best?" – Jimmy Carter
  • "Peaches And Cream" – Jimmy Carter (from Georgia) and running mate Walter Mondale (from Minnesota)

1980Edit

1984Edit

  • "It's Morning Again in America" – Ronald Reagan
  • "For New Leadership" (also "America Needs New Leadership") – Walter Mondale
  • "Where's the beef?" – Walter Mondale. An advertising slogan used by the restaurant chain Wendy's to imply that its competitors served sandwiches with relatively small contents of beef. Used by Mondale to imply that the program policies of rival candidate Gary Hart lacked actual substance.

1988Edit

1992Edit

  • "For People, for a Change" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "It's Time to Change America" – a theme of the 1992 U.S. presidential campaign of Bill Clinton
  • "Putting People First" – 1992 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Bill Clinton
  • "It's the economy, stupid" – originally intended for an internal audience, it became the de facto slogan for the Bill Clinton campaign
  • "Stand by the President" – George H. W. Bush
  • "A Proud Tradition" – George H. W. Bush
  • "Don't Change the Team in the Middle of the Stream" – George H. W. Bush and Dan Quayle
  • "America First" – Pat Buchanan
  • "Down with King George" – Pat Buchanan, in reference to Bush
  • "Send Bush a Message" – Pat Buchanan
  • "Conservative of the Heart" – Pat Buchanan
  • "A Voice for the Voiceless" – Pat Buchanan
  • "Ross for Boss" – Ross Perot
  • "I'm Ross, and you're the Boss!" – Ross Perot
  • "Leadership for a Change – Ross Perot

1996Edit

  • "Building a bridge to the twenty-first century" – Bill Clinton
  • "Bob Dole. A Better Man. For a Better America." or "The Better Man for a Better America" – Bob Dole
  • "Go Pat Go" – Pat Buchanan

2000–presentEdit

2000Edit

2004Edit

2008Edit

  • "Yes We Can" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "We are the ones we've been waiting for." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign rallying cry of Barack Obama during the Democratic convention in Denver.
  • "Change We Can Believe In." – 2008 US presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama
  • "Change We Need." and "Change." – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Fired up! Ready to go!" – Barack Obama campaign chant, 2008
  • "Hope" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of Barack Obama during the general election.
  • "Country First" – 2008 U.S. presidential campaign slogan of John McCain
  • "Reform, prosperity and peace" – 2008 U.S. presidential motto of John McCain.[22][23]
  • "People Fighting Back", and "We'll fight back" – Ralph Nader campaign slogan
  • "Ready for change, ready to lead" – Hillary Clinton campaign slogan, also "Big Challenges, Real Solutions: Time to Pick a President," "In to Win," "Working for Change, Working for You," and "The strength and experience to make change happen."[24]

2012Edit

Democratic Party candidatesEdit

  • "Forward" – 2012 U.S. presidential slogan of Barack Obama.

Republican Party candidatesEdit

Libertarian Party candidatesEdit

Green Party candidatesEdit

Constitution Party candidatesEdit

2016Edit

Republican Party candidatesEdit

Democratic Party candidatesEdit

Libertarian Party candidatesEdit

Green Party candidatesEdit

IndependentsEdit

  • "It's never too late to do the right thing" – used by Evan McMullin

2020Edit

Republican Party candidatesEdit

Democratic Party candidatesEdit

Libertarian Party CandidatesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Braiker, Brian (July 14, 2004). "They Might Be Onto Something". Newsweek. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  2. ^ "American Political Prints 1766-1876". loc.harpweek.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2016.
  3. ^ "54° 40' or Fight". www.ushistory.org. Archived from the original on July 20, 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Presidential Campaign Slogans". www.presidentsusa.net. Archived from the original on February 8, 2014.
  5. ^ Berliner, David C. (June 3, 1973). "Frelinghuysen: Moderate Republican". New York Times. New York, NY. Archived from the original on May 10, 2018.
  6. ^ Heritage-Slater Political Memorabilia and Americana Auction Catalog #625. Heritage Numismatic Auctions, Inc.: Dallas, TX. 2005. p. 179. ISBN 9781932899672.
  7. ^ "Slogans in Presidential Campaigns" (PDF). The Center for Civic Education. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  8. ^ Conradt, Stacy (October 8, 2008). "The Quick 10: 10 Campaign Slogans of the Past". Mental Floss. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
  9. ^ "Posters and Election Propaganda: "America First" – Communication Management and Design – Ithaca College". www.ithaca.edu. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017.
  10. ^ "One Hundred Years Ago, Eugene Debs Gave An Anti-War Speech That Landed Him in Prison". Common Dreams. Retrieved January 25, 2019.
  11. ^ Gallery 5: The Logical Candidate Archived October 6, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, The Hoover Library & Museum.
  12. ^ A Chicken for Every Pot, U.S. government archive.
  13. ^ "Buck passing", Wikipedia, September 21, 2020, retrieved October 6, 2020
  14. ^ ""The Buck Stops Here" Desk sign | Harry S. Truman". www.trumanlibrary.gov. Retrieved October 12, 2020.
  15. ^ https://presidentialcampaignselectionsreference.wordpress.com/overviews/20th-century/1960-overview/
  16. ^ Nichols, John (December 11, 2005). "Eugene McCarthy's Lyrical Politics". The Nation (blog). Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  17. ^ Nixon Now (Nixon, 1972) Archived October 11, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Museum of the Moving Image (2012).
  18. ^ Nichols, John (October 19, 2012). "The Genius of McGovern's 'Come Home, America' Vision". The Nation. New York, NY. Archived from the original on October 20, 2016.
  19. ^ Dudden, Arthur Power (May 10, 1989). American Humor. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780195050547 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ a b "Will Rabbe, Producer, Journalist & Historian – Blog – Most Underrated Political Slogan: "They Can't Lick Our Dick"". willrabbe.com. Retrieved April 22, 2017.
  21. ^ a b Tumulty, Karen (January 18, 2017). "How Donald Trump came up with 'Make America Great Again'". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 13, 2019.
  22. ^ Montopoli, Brian (June 17, 2008). "McCain's Slogan: "Reform, Prosperity and Peace"". CBS News. Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  23. ^ Hollywood double takes (#3) "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 24, 2011. Retrieved January 3, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)[failed verification]
  24. ^ Smith, Ben (January 3, 2008). "Undecided: Hillary keeps shifting slogans". Politico. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  25. ^ Sweeney, Dan (December 28, 2015). "Jeb comes to South Florida, sans exclamation mark". Sun-Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  26. ^ Killough, Ashley (January 6, 2016). "Jeb Bush, the 'joyful tortoise,' gives out tiny toy turtles on trail". CNN. Archived from the original on August 30, 2017.
  27. ^ "2016 Presidential Campaign Slogan Survey". tagline guru. Archived from the original on October 29, 2015. Retrieved October 19, 2015.
  28. ^ Allen, Mike (April 6, 2015). "Rand Paul unveils populist, anti-establishment slogan". Politico. Archived from the original on December 28, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  29. ^ Nelson, Angela (December 26, 2015). "Huckabee's Hope is From "Tree Town" to Higher Ground". KIOW. Pilot Knob Broadcasting. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  30. ^ Ashley Killough. "Designers critique campaign logos". CNN. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  31. ^ "Campaign 2016: Carly Fiorina, GOP Presidential Candidate". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved October 1, 2018.
  32. ^ Bloomberg (June 5, 2015), The Best & Worst 2016 Campaign Logos, retrieved October 1, 2018
  33. ^ Benen, Steve (July 26, 2016). "Michelle Obama: 'When they go low, we go high'". MSNBC. Archived from the original on October 18, 2016. Retrieved October 19, 2016.