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List of Juventus F.C. records and statistics

This is a list of Juventus F.C. records and statistics. Juventus Football Club is an Italian professional association football club based in Turin, Piedmont that competes in Serie A, the top football league in the country. The club was formed in 1897 as Sport Club Juventus by a group of Massimo D'Azeglio Lyceum young students and played its first competitive match on 11 March 1900, when it entered the Piedmont round of the IIIº Federal Championship.[1]

This list encompasses the major honours won by Juventus and records set by the club, their managers and their players. The individual records section includes details of the club's leading goalscorers and those who have made most appearances in first-team competitions. The club's players have received, among others, a record twenty five Oscar del Calcio, the awards given by the Italian Footballers' Association (AIC), eight Ballon d'Or awards and four FIFA World Player of the Year awards, more than any other Italian club in both cases.

Contents

HonoursEdit

 
A partial view of the club's trophy room with the titles won between 1905 and 2013 at J-Museum

Italy's most successful club of the 20th century[2] and the most successful club in the history of Italian football,[3] Juventus have won the Italian League Championship, the country's premier football club competition and organised by Lega Nazionale Professionisti Serie A (LNPA), a record 35 times and have the record of consecutive triumphs in that tournament (eight, between 2011–12 and 2018–19).[4][5] They have also won the Coppa Italia, the country's primary single-elimination competition, a record 13 times, becoming the first team to retain the trophy successfully with their triumph in the 1959–60 season, and the first to win it in three consecutive seasons from the 2014–15 season to the 2016–17 season, and went on to win it a fourth consecutive time in 2017–18.[6] In addition, the club holds the record for Supercoppa Italiana wins with eight, the most recent coming in 2018.

Overall, Juventus have won 67 official competitions,[nb 1] more than any other Italian club: 56 domestic trophies (which is also a record) and 11 official international competitions,[7] making them, in the latter case, the second most successful Italian club in European competition.[8] The club is currently fifth in Europe and eleventh in the world with the most international titles won officially recognised by their respective continental football confederation and Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).[9] In 1977, the Torinese side become the first in Southern Europe to have won the UEFA Cup and the first—and only to date—in Italian football history to achieve an international title with a squad composed by national footballers.[10] In 1993, the club won its third competition's trophy, an unprecedented feat in the continent until then and the most for an Italian club. Juventus was also the first Italian club to achieve the title in the European Super Cup, having won the competition in 1984, and the first European club to win the Intercontinental Cup in 1985, since it was restructured by Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (CONMEBOL)'s organizing committee five years beforehand.[11]

The club has earned the distinction of being allowed to wear three Golden Stars (Italian: stelle d'oro) on its shirts representing its league victories: the tenth of which was achieved during the 1957–58 season, the twentieth in the 1981–82 season and the thirtieth officially in the 2013–14 season. Juventus were the first Italian team to have achieved the national double four times (winning the Italian top tier division and the national cup competition in the same season), in the 1959–60, 1994–95, 2014–15 and 2015–16 seasons. In the 2015–16 season, Juventus won the Coppa Italia for the 11th time and their second-straight title, becoming the first team in Italy's history to complete Serie A and Coppa Italia doubles in back-to-back seasons; Juventus would go on to win another two consecutive doubles in 2016–17 and 2017–18.[12][13][14]

In 1985, Juventus became the first club in the history of European football to have won all three major UEFA competitions, the European Champion Clubs' Cup, the (now-defunct) UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and the UEFA Cup,[15][16] being also the only one to reach it with the same coach.[17] After their triumph in the Intercontinental Cup in the same year, Juventus also became the first football team ever—remain the only one at present—to have won all possible official confederation tournaments.[18][19][20]

Only in the 1910s the club has not won any official competition, a unique case in the country. In terms of overall official trophies won, Juventus' most successful decade was the 2010s. In that period the club won fifteen competitions, ahead the 1980s and 1990s (both with eleven titles).[21]

National titlesEdit

European titlesEdit

World-wide titlesEdit

Other honoursEdit

Awards and recognitionsEdit

NationalEdit

1958, 1982 and 2014
1939
1997, 1998, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017
1985, 1996 and 2013
  • Awarded as Piedmont's Sports Team of the Year by the Unione Stampa Sportiva Italiana (USSI): 2[43][44]
2012 and 2013

InternationalEdit

23 December 2000
10 September 2009
for three years since the institution of the ranking on 2007
1993 and 1996
January 2004, September 2005, January 2012 and December 2012
  • Awarded as World's Sports Team of the Year by the Association Internationale de la Presse Sportive (AIPS): 2[49]
1984–85 and 1985–86 seasons
  • Nominated Champion of the Century in Italian football and second most successful club of the 20th century by the Brazilian sports magazine Placar[50]
November 1999
March 2014
1985
1977 and 1990
2005
16 times since the institution of the ranking on 1991
for seven seasons since the institution of the ranking on 1979

OtherEdit

  • Gianni Brera Award to the Sports Personality of the Year: 1[58]
2013

AchievementsEdit

As one of the most successful sportive clubs in Italy and the world, Juventus have received during their history of important national and international special recognitions, among them:

  • Medaglia di Bronzo al Valore Atletico: 1935
received on 7 July 1935 from the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI) in recognition to the fifth consecutive Serie A title won (Italian record).[59]
  • Stella d'oro al Merito Sportivo: 1966
received on 22 June 1967 from the CONI in recognition for the club's outstanding contribution to the Italian sport.[60]
  • Collare d'oro al Merito Sportivo: 2001
received on 10 November 2004 from the Italian National Olympic Committee in recognition for the club's contribution to the Italian football and sport.[61][62]
received on 12 July 1988 at Geneva (Switzerland) by the Union of European Football Associations in recognition for the club's triumph in the all three major UEFA competitions (European record).[63][64]

Divisional movementsEdit

Series Years First Last Promotions Relegations
A 86 1929–30 2018–19 -   1 (2005–06)
B 1 2006–07 2006–07   1 (2006–07) never
87 years of professional football in Italy since 1929

Individual recordsEdit

AppearancesEdit

Appearances in competitive matchesEdit

All-time over 300 appearancesEdit

As of 26 May 2019 (competitive matches only):

No. Name Years Italian championship Coppa Italia Europe Other Total
1   Alessandro Del Piero 1993–2012 513 (Serie B: 35) 56 127 9 705
2   Gianluigi Buffon 2001–2018
2019–
509 (Serie B: 37) 15 124 8 656
3   Gaetano Scirea 1974–1988 377 88 85 2 552
4   Giuseppe Furino 1969–1984 361 89 78 0 528
5   Giorgio Chiellini 2005–present 383 (Serie B: 32) 30 88 5 506
6   Roberto Bettega 1970–1983 326 74 81 1 482
7   Dino Zoff 1972–1983 330 74 71 1 476
8   Giampiero Boniperti 1946–1961 443 13 3 0 459
9   Sandro Salvadore 1962–1974 331 56 62 1 450
10   Franco Causio 1967–1968
1970–1981
305 70 71 1 447
11   Antonio Cabrini 1976–1989 297 72 68 3 440
12   Antonello Cuccureddu 1969–1981 298 66 69 1 434
13   Antonio Conte 1991–2004 295 43 78 3 419
14   Claudio Gentile 1973–1984 283 67 64 1 415
15   Giovanni Varglien 1929–1947 379 19 0 13 411
16   Alessio Tacchinardi 1994–2007 261 43 90 10 404
17   Mario Varglien 1927–1942 353 17 0 32 402
18   Claudio Marchisio 2005–2018 294 (Serie B: 25) 24 66 5 389
19   Teobaldo Depetrini 1933–1949 359 23 0 6 388
20   Gianfranco Leoncini 1958–1970 289 38 52 5 384
21   Sergio Brio 1974–1990 243 73 59 3 378
22   Stefano Tacconi 1983–1992 254 64 56 3 377
23   Marco Tardelli 1975–1985 259 55 60 1 375
24   Francesco Morini 1969–1980 256 54 61 1 372
25   Gianpiero Combi 1921–1934 352 1 0 17 370
26   Gianluca Pessotto 1995–2006 243 39 82 2 366
27   Virginio Rosetta 1923–1936 338 3 0 25 366
28   Leonardo Bonucci 2010–2017
2018–present
256 26 73 5 360
29   Ciro Ferrara 1994–2005 253 26 72 7 358
30   Ernesto Castano 1958–1970 265 31 39 5 340
31   Carlo Parola 1939–1954 333 6 0 0 339
32   Pietro Rava 1935–1943
1944
1946–1947
303 21 0 6 330
33   Pavel Nedvěd 2001–2009 247 (Serie B: 33) 22 55 3 327
34   David Trezeguet 2000–2010 245 (Serie B: 31) 16 57 2 320
35   Giancarlo Marocchi 1988–1996 213 51 54 1 319
36   Roberto Anzolin 1961–1970 230 29 46 5 310
37   Felice Placido Borel II 1932–1941

1942–1946

280 11 0 17 308
38   Alessandro Birindelli 1997–2008 196 (Serie B: 37) 38 66 5 305
39   Alfredo Foni 1934–1947 266 25 0 13 304
40   Pietro Anastasi 1968–1976 205 51 46 1 303
41   Angelo Peruzzi 1991–1999 208 24 63 6 301
  • Note: bold signifies current Juventus player.
  • Italian championship = Serie A + Serie B
  • Europe = European Champions Cup/Champions League, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, UEFA Cup/Europa League, Cup Winners' Cup, UEFA Intertoto Cup.
  • Other = Supercoppa Italiana, UEFA Super Cup, Intercontinental Cup, European Cup Playoff, Central European Cup (Mitropa Cup).

GoalscorersEdit

Goalscorers in competitive matchesEdit

All-time top 15 goalscorersEdit

As of 26 May 2019 (competitive matches only):

No. Name Years Italian championship Coppa Italia Europe Other Total
1   Alessandro Del Piero 1993–2012 208 25 50 7 290
2   Giampiero Boniperti 1946–1961 178 1 0 0 179
3   Roberto Bettega 1970–1983 129 22 27 0 178
4   David Trezeguet 2000–2010 138 2 30 1 171
5     Omar Sívori 1957–1965 135 24 8 0 167
6   Felice Placido Borel II 1932–1941
1942–1946
138 9 0 11 158
7   Pietro Anastasi 1968–1976 78 30 22 0 130
8   John Hansen 1948–1954 124 0 0 0 124
9   Roberto Baggio 1990–1995 78 14 22 1 115
10   Federico Munerati 1922–1933 110 0 1 2 113
11   John Charles 1957–1962 93 12 0 0 105
12   Michel Platini 1982–1987 68 16 19 1 104
13   Guglielmo Gabetto 1934–1941 85 12 0 5 102
14   Filippo Inzaghi 1997–2001 57 2 20 10 89
15     Raimundo Orsi 1928–1935 77 0 0 11 88
  • Note: bold signifies current Juventus player.
  • Italian championship = Serie A + Serie B.
  • Europe = European Champions Cup/Champions League, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, UEFA Cup/Europa League, Cup Winners' Cup, UEFA Intertoto Cup.
  • Other = Supercoppa Italiana, UEFA Super Cup, Intercontinental Cup, European Cup Playoff, Central European Cup (Mitropa Cup).

Juventus’ top goalscorers in a single season (All competitive matches)Edit

Name Season Goals
1   Ferenc Hirzer 1925–26 35
2   Felice Placido Borel II 1933–34 32
2   Alessandro Del Piero 1997–98 32
2   David Trezeguet 2001–02 32
2   Gonzalo Higuaín 2016–17 32
6    Omar Sívori 1957–58 31
6    Omar Sívori 1959–60 31
8   Fabrizio Ravanelli 1994–95 30
8   Roberto Baggio 1992–93 30
8   John Hansen 1951–52 30
11   Carlos Tévez 2014–15 29
11   David Trezeguet 2005–06 29
11   Michel Platini 1984–85 29
11   John Charles 1957–58 29
11   Felice Placido Borel II 1932–33 29
  • Note: bold signifies current Juventus player.

GoalkeepingEdit

TrophiesEdit

As of 22 April 2019:

PlayersEdit

No. Name Total Serie A Coppa Italia Supercoppa Italia ECC/CL UEFA Cup/EL CWC EuSC IntCup ITC Serie B
1   Gianluigi Buffon (2001–2018) 21 11 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2   Alessandro Del Piero (1993–2012) 18 8 1 4 1 0 0 1 1 1 1
2   Giorgio Chiellini (2005–present) 18 9 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
4   Andrea Barzagli (2011–2019) 16 8 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5   Ciro Ferrara (1994–2005) 15 6 1 4 1 0 0 1 1 1 0
5   Alessio Tacchinardi (1994–2007) 15 6 1 4 1 0 0 1 1 1 0
5   Antonio Conte (1991–2004) 15 5 1 4 1 1 0 1 1 1 0
5   Claudio Marchisio (2005–2018) 15 7 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
9   Gaetano Scirea (1974–1988) 14 7 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
9   Gianluca Pessotto (1995–2006) 14 6 0 4 1 0 0 1 1 1 0
9   Stephan Lichtsteiner (2011–2018) 14 7 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
12   Leonardo Bonucci (2010–2017, 2018–present) 13 6 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
12   Antonio Cabrini (1976–1989) 13 6 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
12   Kwadwo Asamoah (2012–2018) 13 6 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
15   Giuseppe Furino (1969–1984) 12 8 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
15   Sergio Brio (1974–1990) 12 4 3 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0
15   Michelangelo Rampulla (1992–2002) 12 4 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0
18   Marco Tardelli (1975–1985) 11 5 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0
18   Paolo Montero (1996–2005) 11 5 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 0
18   Martín Cáceres (2009–2010, 2012–2016, 2019-present) 11 6 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
21   Roberto Bettega (1970–1983) 10 7 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
21   Claudio Gentile (1973–1984) 10 6 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0
21   Angelo Peruzzi (1991–1999) 10 3 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0
21   Moreno Torricelli (1992–1998) 10 3 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0
21   Mark Iuliano (1996–2005) 10 4 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 0
21   Simone Padoin (2012–2016) 10 5 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  • Note: bold signifies current Juventus player.
  • ECC/CL = European Champions Cup/Champions League, CWC = Cup Winners' Cup, EuSC = European Super Cup, IntCup = Intercontinental Cup, ITC = Intertoto Cup.

ManagersEdit

No. Name Total Serie A Coppa Italia Supercoppa Italiana ECC/CL UEFA Cup/EL CWC EuSC IntCup ITC Serie B
1   Giovanni Trapattoni (1976–1986, 1991–1994) 14 6 2 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0
2   Marcello Lippi (1994–1999, 2001–2004) 13 5 1 4 1 0 0 1 1 0 0
3   Massimiliano Allegri (2014–present) 11 5 4 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4   Antonio Conte (2011–2014) 5 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4   Carlo Parola (1959–1961, 1961–62, 1974–1976) 5 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6   Carlo Carcano (1930–1934) 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7   Čestmír Vycpálek (1971–1974) 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7   Fabio Capello (2004–2006) 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7   Heriberto Herrera (1964–1969) 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7   Dino Zoff (1988–1990) 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
11   Carlo Bigatto (1934–1935) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   Ljubiša Broćić (1957–1958) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   Jesse Carver (1949–1951) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   Jenő Károly (1923–1926) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   György Sárosi (1951–1953) 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11     Luis Monti (1942) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   Virginio Rosetta (1935–1939) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
11   Carlo Ancelotti (1999–2001) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
11   Didier Deschamps (2006–2007) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
  • Note: bold signifies current Juventus manager.
  • ECC/CL = European Champions Cup/Champions League, CWC = Cup Winners' Cup, EuSC = European Super Cup, IntCup = Intercontinental Cup, ITC = Intertoto Cup.

Individual recognitionsEdit

UEFA Golden Player Award 1955–2005Edit

Country Player
Belarus   Sergeij Alejnikov
Denmark   Michael Laudrup
Italy   Dino Zoff
San Marino   Massimo Bonini
Wales   John William Charles

European Footballer of the Year (Ballon d'Or)Edit

Year Player
2003   Pavel Nedvěd
1998   Zinedine Zidane
1993   Roberto Baggio
1983, 1984, 1985   Michel Platini
1982   Paolo Rossi
1961     Omar Sívori

* Juventus is the European team with the most players recognized with the Ballon d'Or (6 players in 8 times).

FIFA World Player AwardEdit

Year Player
2006   Fabio Cannavaro
1998, 2000   Zinedine Zidane
1993   Roberto Baggio

World Soccer's World Football Player of the Year AwardEdit

Year Player
2006   Fabio Cannavaro
2003   Pavel Nedvěd
1998   Zinedine Zidane
1995   Gianluca Vialli
1993   Roberto Baggio
1984, 1985   Michel Platini
1982   Paolo Rossi

* Juventus is the European team with the most players recognized with the World Soccer Player of the Year Award (7 players in 8 times).

Golden Foot International Football AwardEdit

Year Player
2016   Gianluigi Buffon
2007   Alessandro Del Piero
2004   Pavel Nedvěd

Serie A Italian Footballer of the YearEdit

Year Player
2008   Alessandro Del Piero
2006   Fabio Cannavaro
1998   Alessandro Del Piero

Serie A Foreign Footballer of the YearEdit

Year Player
2005   Zlatan Ibrahimović
2003   Pavel Nedvěd
2002  David Trezeguet
1997, 2001   Zinedine Zidane

Serie A Footballer of the YearEdit

Year Player
2017   Gianluigi Buffon
2016   Leonardo Bonucci
2015   Carlos Tevez
2014   Andrea Pirlo
2013   Andrea Pirlo
2012   Andrea Pirlo
2006   Fabio Cannavaro
2003   Pavel Nedvěd
2002   David Trezeguet
2001   Zinedine Zidane

Serie A Goalkeeper of the YearEdit

Player Count Year
  Gianluigi Buffon 10 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Serie A Coach of the YearEdit

Coach Year
  Massimiliano Allegri 2018
  Massimiliano Allegri 2016
  Massimiliano Allegri 2015
  Antonio Conte 2014
  Antonio Conte 2013
  Antonio Conte 2012
  Fabio Capello 2005
  Carlo Ancelotti 2001
  Marcello Lippi 1998
  Marcello Lippi 1997

Serie A AwardsEdit

Award Winner Club Year
Most Valuable Player   Cristiano Ronaldo Juventus 2018–19

Club recordsEdit

First competitive matchesEdit

Club recordsEdit

As of 20 May 2018.

  • Victories and defeats:
  • Most points in any 20-team European Domestic League
    • 102 in 38 games (2013–14)
  • Most points in a season:
    • 3 points for a win: 102 in 38 games (2013–14)
    • 2 points for a win: 62 in 38 games (1949–50)
  • Most league victories in a season: 33[73] in 38 games (2013–14)
  • Most home wins in a season: 19[73] in 19 games (2013–14)
  • Fewest league draws in a season: 3 in 38 games (2013–14)
  • Most league draws in a season: 17 in 34 games (1955–56)
  • Fewest league defeats in a season: 0 in 38 games (2011–12)
  • Most league defeats in a season: 15 in 38 games (1961–62, 2009–10)
  • Most league goals scored in a season (by team): 103 in 38 games (1950–51)
  • Fewest league goals scored in a season (by team): 28 in 30 games (1938–39)
  • Fewest league goals conceded in a season (by team): 14[77] in 30 games (1981–82)
  • Most league goals conceded in a season (by team): 56 in 34 games (1961–62)
  • Longest sequence of League victories:
    • In a single season: 15, since 11th match on 31 October 2015 (Juventus 2–1 Torino) to 25th match on 13 February 2016 (Juventus 1–0 Napoli)[78]
    • Overlapping seasons: 13, since the 32nd match of the 2013–14 season to the 6th match of the 2014–15 season
    • Since the first match in a single season: 9,[79] (2005–06)
  • Longest sequence of unbeaten league matches (consecutive matches):
    • In a single season: 38 (2011–12. With 38 matches in the 2011–12 league season, Juventus finished unbeaten in the league)
    • Overall: 49 (since 38th match of the 2010–11 season to 10th match of the 2012–13 season)
  • Longest sequence of league matches without a victory:
    • In a single season: 8 (1938–39 season and 1955–56 season)
    • Overall: 13 (since the eighteenth to thirty-first match of 1955–56 season and since the 12th to 25th match of the 1961–62 season)
  • Longest sequence of League defeats:
    • Overall and in a single season: 7 (since the third to 28th to 34th match of the 1961–62 season)

SigningsEdit

The sale of Zinedine Zidane to Real Madrid of Spain from Juventus in 2001 was the world football transfer record at the time, costing the Spanish club around €77.5 million (150 billion lire).[80][81]

The intake of Gianluigi Buffon in 2001 from Parma cost Juventus €52 million (100 billion lire), making it the then-most expensive transfer for a goalkeeper of all-time until 2018.[82][83]

On 26 July 2016, Juventus signing Gonzalo Higuaín became the third highest football transfer of all-time and highest ever transfer for an Italian club, at the time,[84] when he signed for €90 million from Napoli.[85]

On 8 August 2016, Paul Pogba returned to his first club, Manchester United, for the former record for highest football transfer fee at €105 million, surpassing the previous record holder Gareth Bale.[86]

On 10 July 2018, Cristiano Ronaldo became the highest ever transfer for an Italian club with his €100 million transfer from Real Madrid.[87]

Statistics in European competitionsEdit

Serie A Football Club of the YearEdit

  • 7 times: 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

Gazzetta Sports Awards Team of the YearEdit

  • 5 times: 1985, 1996, 2013, 2015, 2017

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Including exclusively the official titles won during its participation in the top flight of Italian football.
  2. ^ Up until 1921, the top division of Italian football was the Federal Football Championship, since then, it has been the First Division, the National Division, and the Serie A.
  3. ^ a b These titles were revoked through the courts following the Calciopoli Scandal.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Juventus Football Club: The History". Juventus Football Club S.p.A official website. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Europe's club of the Century". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  3. ^ "Juventus building bridges in Serie B". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Serie A TIM: Albo d'oro". Lega Nazionale Professionisti (in Italian). Archived from the original on 30 August 2011. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  5. ^ "Juventus win fifth straight Serie A title after Napoli lose to Roma". ESPNFC. 25 April 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  6. ^ a b "Albo d'oro TIM Cup". Lega Nazionale Professionisti Serie A (in Italian). Archived from the original on 27 May 2012. Retrieved 21 May 2012.
  7. ^ a b "Football Europe: Juventus F.C." Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  8. ^ "Italian Football Federation: Profile". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  9. ^ Fifth most successful European club for confederation and FIFA competitions won with 11 titles. Fifth most successful club in Europe for confederation club competition titles won (11), cf. "Confermato: I più titolati al mondo!". A.C. Milan S.p.A official website. 30 May 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  10. ^ "UEFA Europa League: Facts & Figures". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  11. ^ "1985: Juventus end European drought". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 8 December 1985. Archived from the original on 8 December 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  12. ^ "Juventus claim back-to-back doubles after 11th Coppa Italia success". eurosport.com. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  13. ^ "Milan 0-1 Juventus (AET): Morata grabs extra-time winner to seal another double". goal.com. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  14. ^ "Coppa Italia: Morata in extra time". Football Italia. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  15. ^ "History of the UEFA Cup". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Un dilema histórico" (pdf) (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  17. ^ "Giovanni Trapattoni". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 2010-05-31. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  18. ^ In addition, Juventus F.C. were the first club in association football history to have won all possible confederation competitions (e.g. the international tournaments organised by UEFA) and remain the only in the world to achieve this, cf. "Legend: UEFA club competitions". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 21 August 2006. Archived from the original on 31 January 2010. Retrieved 26 February 2013.
    "1985: Juventus end European drought". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 8 December 1985. Archived from the original on 8 December 2013. Retrieved 26 February 2013.
  19. ^ "FIFA Club World Championship TOYOTA Cup: Solidarity – the name of the game" (PDF). FIFA Activity Report 2005. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association: 62. April 2004 – May 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 October 2012. Retrieved 17 December 2012.
  20. ^ "We are the champions". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 12 January 2005. Archived from the original on 30 April 2011. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  21. ^ During the 1980s, Juventus won four Serie A titles, two Coppa Italia titles, one Intercontinental Cup, one European Champions Clubs' Cup, one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, one UEFA Cup and one UEFA Super Cup; meanwhile, in the following decade, the club has won three Italian Championships, one Coppa Italia title, two Supercoppa Italiana titles, one Intercontinental Cup, one UEFA Champions League, one UEFA Cup, one UEFA Intertoto Cup and one UEFA Super Cup. Finally, in the 2010s the club has won seven consecutive national championships, four consecutive national cups and four Supercoppa Italiana titles.
  22. ^ "Supercoppa TIM: Albo d'oro". Lega Nazionale Professionisti (in Italian). Archived from the original on 2009-09-01. Retrieved 2009-08-20.
  23. ^ "Italy – List of Second Division (Serie B) Champions". The Record Sport Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  24. ^ "European Champions' Cup". The Record Sport Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  25. ^ Up until 1992, the UEFA's premier club competition was the European Champion Clubs' Cup; since then, it has been the UEFA Champions League.
  26. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup: All-time finals". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Archived from the original on 23 January 2005. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  27. ^ "UEFA Cup: All-time finals". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Archived from the original on 12 April 2009. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  28. ^ The European Inter-Cities Fairs Cup (1958–1971) was a football tournament organized by foreign trade fairs in European seven cities (London, Barcelona, Copenhagen, and others) played by professional and—in its first editions—amateur clubs. Along these lines, that is not recognised by the Union of European Football Associations as an UEFA club competition. See: "UEFA Europa League: History". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  29. ^ "UEFA Intertoto Cup winners since 1995 (page 2)" (PDF). European Football Pool. Archived from the original (pdf) on 14 March 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  30. ^ "1999: Juve add illustrious name to trophy". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  31. ^ "UEFA Super Cup: All-time finals". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Archived from the original on 28 December 2004. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  32. ^ The UEFA Super Cup 1985 final between Juventus and Everton, 1984–85 Cup Winners' Cup winners, was not played due to the Heysel Stadium disaster. See: "UEFA Super Cup: History". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Archived from the original on 14 October 2008. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  33. ^ Up until 2004, the main world-wide football club competition was the Intercontinental Champions Clubs' Cup (so called European/South American Cup or Toyota Cup). Since then, it has been replaced by the FIFA Club World Cup.
  34. ^ "UEFA/CONMEBOL Intercontinental Cup: All-time finals". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. Archived from the original on 23 January 2005. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  35. ^ a b c d Bruno Perucca (November 22, 1996). "Il bilancio dei 214 derby" (in Italian). La Stampa. p. 2. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  36. ^ The Federal Championship of Prima Categoria (First Category/Division) has been a tournament organized by the Italian Football Federation (FIF) in 1908 equivalent to the Italian Championship of Prima Categoria (the national football championship in these two years).
  37. ^ The Italian Championship of Prima Categoria (First Category/Division) has been a tournament organized by the Italian Football Federation (FIF) in 1909 equivalent to the Federal Championship of Prima Categoria (the national football championship in these two years).
  38. ^ Juventus also has won the Italian-Spanish Friendship's Cup perpetually.
  39. ^ Prize awarded by the DItalian Football Federation (FIGC) board for the record for titles won in the Divisione Nazionale A Championship àt the end of the 1938-39 season, cf. "Il Direttorio della FIGC: Il programma del viaggio in Finlandia. Coppa Meazza alla Juventus cinque volte campione. Nuovi aspiranti allenatori" (in Italian). La Stampa. 27 June 1939. p. 4. Retrieved 16 January 2013.
  40. ^ "AIC – Albo d'oro". Associazione Italiana Calciatori (in Italian). Archived from the original on 15 May 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  41. ^ a b "È Magnini la superstar 2005" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. 30 December 2005. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  42. ^ Simone Battaggia (30 December 2013). "Referendum Gazzetta: vincono Serena e Bolt. Jessica Rossi e Nibali gli italiani più votati" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  43. ^ "Agnelli: "Scudetto è solo il primo passo"" (in Italian). La Stampa. 10 December 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  44. ^ "Sportivo piemontese dell'anno: vince la Juve" (in Italian). Tuttosport. 16 December 2013. Archived from the original on 17 December 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  45. ^ "The FIFA Clubs of the 20th Century" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 23 December 2000. Archived from the original (pdf) on 23 April 2007. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  46. ^ Periods: 1991–2007 (Juventus rank second in the world), 1991–2008 (rank third in the world) and 1991–2009 (idem). All the results of All-Time Club World Ranking are determined by IFFHS from 1 January 1991, when the Club World Ranking began taking all these details into consideration. See also: "All-Time Club World Ranking (since 1.1.1991)". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  47. ^ "The 'Top 25' of each year (since 1991)". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  48. ^ "IFFHS The World's Club Team of the Month". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. 3 January 2008. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  49. ^ "Juve, la migliore del mondo". Hurrà Juventus (in Italian). 4. April 1986.
  50. ^ Celso Unzelte (November 1999). "Os campeões do milênio". Placar (in Portuguese). 1157: 54–59.
  51. ^ "Die legendären Weltklubs, "Die Wappen der Vereine und ihre Geschichte"". Kicker Edition (in German). Kicker-Sportmagazin. March 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-03-22. Retrieved 24 September 2014.
  52. ^ Guilherme Feijó (20 March 2014). "Revista alemã faz ranking dos maiores clubes do planeta, mas 'esquece' sul-americanos" (in Portuguese). CBN Foz do Iguaçu. Archived from the original on 22 March 2014. Retrieved 21 March 2014.
  53. ^ Angelo Caroli (5 November 1977). "Juve 'Europea'" (in Italian). La Stampa. p. 18. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  54. ^ "Schillaci premiato: Pallone e Scarpa d'oro del mondiale" (in Italian). La Stampa. 8 January 1991. p. 33. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  55. ^ "Former champions honoured". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 16 December 2005. Retrieved 28 November 2012.
  56. ^ "Clubs more times first in Club World Ranking". International Federation of Football History & Statistics. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  57. ^ Five-year periods: 1982–1986, 1983–1987, 1984–1988, 1987–1991, 1993–1997, 1995–1999 and 1996–2000, record between Italian clubs and second European record after Real Madrid (9 times in the 1st place). The club coefficient is determined by the results of a club in UEFA club competition in the last five seasons and the league coefficient. See also:
    "UEFA European Cup Coefficients Database: Historical info". Retrieved 22 April 2017.
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  59. ^ "Il Duce premierà gli atleti vanto dello sport fascista" (in Italian). La Stampa. 1935-06-22. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-02-07.
  60. ^ Giampiero Timossi (2009-11-18). "Juve a tre stelle? Dovrebbe decidere la Lega" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. Retrieved 2010-10-23.
  61. ^ The Collare d'Oro al Merito Sportivo or Collare d'Oro per Meriti Sportivi (Golden Collar for Sport Excellence) is the highest prize that the Italian National Olympic Committee (CONI) has been given since 1995 to Olympic athletes, world champions, winners of special international events and sport clubs with 100 years of activity to have honoured the Italian sport.
  62. ^ CONI's Press Agency ANNO XXX - N. 229. See also: "Collare d'Oro 2001: Juventus F.C. S.p.A." Comitato Olimpico Nazionale Italiano (in Italian). Retrieved 10 November 2004.
  63. ^ "Sorteo de las competiciones europeas de fútbol: el Fram de Reykjavic, primer adversario del F.C. Barcelona en la Recopa" (PDF) (in Spanish). La Vanguardia. 1988-07-13. p. 53. Retrieved 2009-11-15.
  64. ^ "Tutto inizio' con un po' di poesia" (in Italian). La Gazzetta dello Sport. Retrieved 1997-05-24. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  65. ^ "La storia di una leggenda" (in Italian). juventus.com.
  66. ^ Joint record of Italian football with Julio Libonatti (Torino F.C. 1906) in 1927–28 season and Gunnar Nordahl (A.C Milan) in 1949–50.
  67. ^ Roberto Baggio scored 19 goals for Italy as Juventus player, while all 27 of Del Piero's goals for Italy were scored during his time with Juventus.
  68. ^ Paolo Rossi (with 3 goals in 1978 and 6 in 1982) and Roberto Baggio (with 2 goals in 1990; 5 goals in 1994 and 2 goals in 1998) are Italy's all-time leading scorers in FIFA World Cups.
  69. ^ Roberto Baggio scored 7 goals at the FIFA World Cup as Juventus player (2 goals in 1990 and 5 in 1994), while Paolo Rossi scored 6 (in 1982).
  70. ^ Christian Vieri, who played for Juventus during the 1996–97 season, also scored 9 goals for Italy at the FIFA World Cup (5 goals in 1998 and 4 in 2002), making him Italy's joint-all-time goalscorer in FIFA World Cups alongside Baggio and Rossi; however he did not feature at the FIFA World Cup as a Juventus player.
  71. ^ Record in Italian Football Championship.
  72. ^ "Partite della Juventus" (in Italian). juworld.net. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  73. ^ a b c d Record in Serie A.
  74. ^ "Buffon sets new Serie A record". Football Italia. 20 March 2016. Retrieved 20 March 2016.
  75. ^ "Buffon eyes all-time record". Football Italia. 11 March 2016. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  76. ^ a b Juventus has played this match with only ten players in its squad.
  77. ^ Second highest record in Italian football after Cagliari in 1969–70 season (11 goals conceded in 30 games).
  78. ^ Second highest record in Serie A after Internazionale (17) in 2006–07 season.
  79. ^ Second highest record in Serie A after Roma (10) in 2013–14 season.
  80. ^ "Zidane al Real". Juventus FC (in Italian). 9 July 2001. Archived from the original on 6 August 2001. Retrieved 29 August 2013.
  81. ^ "Reports and Financial Statement at 30 June 2002" (PDF). Juventus FC. 20 September 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 June 2015. Retrieved 29 August 2013.
  82. ^ "Rui Costa al Parma, Buffon alla Juve". La Repubblica (in Italian). 30 June 2001. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  83. ^ "Gianluigi Buffon". Football Database. Archived from the original on 14 December 2014. Retrieved 2 September 2014.
  84. ^ "Gonzalo Higuain's £75m Juventus move - its place in history and what it means for football". eurosport.com. 26 July 2016. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  85. ^ "Higuain joins Juventus". juventus.com. 26 July 2016. Retrieved 26 July 2016.
  86. ^ "Official: Pogba signs for Man Utd for €105m". Football Italia. 8 August 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  87. ^ "Cristiano Ronaldo signs for Juventus!". juventus.com (Press release). 10 July 2018.

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