Coppa Italia

The Coppa Italia (English: Italy Cup) is an Italian football annual cup competition. Its first edition was held in 1922 and was won by Vado. The second tournament, scheduled in the 1926–27 season, was cancelled during the round of 32. The third edition was not held until 1935–36 when it started being scheduled annually. The events of World War II interrupted the tournament after the 1942–43 season, and it did not resume again until 1958. Since then, it has been played every year.

Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia - Logo 2019.svg
Organising bodyLega Serie A
Founded1922; 99 years ago (1922)
RegionItaly
Number of teams44
Qualifier forUEFA Europa League
Domestic cup(s)Supercoppa Italiana
Current championsJuventus (14th title)
Most successful club(s)Juventus (14 titles)
Television broadcastersMediaset
List of international broadcasters
Websitelegaseriea.it/timcup
2021–22 Coppa Italia

Juventus is the competition's most successful club with fourteen wins, followed by Roma with nine. Juventus has contested the most finals with twenty, followed by Roma with seventeen finals. The holder can wear a cockade of Italy (Italian: coccarda), akin to the roundels that appear on military aircraft. The winner automatically qualifies for both the UEFA Europa League group stage and the Supercoppa Italiana the following year.

FormatEdit

 
The Coccarda, the winner's patch
 
Gianluigi Buffon in 2016, wearing the Coccarda won with Juventus the season before. Also present is the Scudetto, worn by the holders of the Serie A title

The competition is a knockout tournament with pairings for each round made in advance; the draw for the whole competition is made before a ball is kicked. Each tie is played as a single leg, except the two-legged semi-finals. If a match is drawn, extra time is played. In the event of a draw after 120 minutes, a penalty shoot-out is contested. As well as being presented with the trophy, the winning team also qualifies for the UEFA Europa League (formerly the UEFA Cup). If the winners have already qualified for the UEFA Champions League via Serie A, or are not entitled to play in UEFA competitions for any reason, the place goes to the next highest placed team in the league table.

There are a total of seven rounds in the competition. The competition begins in August with the preliminary round and is contested only by the eight lowest-ranked clubs. Clubs playing in Serie B join in during the first round with the 12 lowest-ranked teams in Serie A based on the previous league season's positions (unless they are to compete in European competition that year) begin the competition in the first round before August is over. The remaining eight Serie A teams join the competition in the third round in January, at which point 16 teams remain. The round of 16, the quarter-finals and the first leg of the semi-finals are then played in quick succession after the fourth round and the second leg of the semi-finals is played a couple of months later—in April before the final in May. The two-legged final was eliminated for the 2007–08 edition and a single-match final is now played at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome.[1]

Phase Round Clubs remaining Clubs involved From previous round Entries in this round Teams entering at this round
First
phase
Preliminary round 44 8 none 8 Four teams from Serie B and four teams from Serie C (ranked 36–44)
First round 40 32 4 28 12 teams from Serie A and 16 teams from Serie B (ranked 9–35)
Second round 24 16 16 none
Second
phase
Round of 16 16 16 8 8 Eight teams from Serie A (ranked 1–8)
Quarter-finals 8 8 8 none
Semi-finals 4 4 4 none
Final 2 2 2 none

Winners by yearEdit

List of winners of Coppa Italia

Performance by clubEdit

TrophiesEdit

Club Winners Winning years
Juventus 14 1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1995, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2021
Roma 9 1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 2007, 2008
Internazionale 7 1939, 1978, 1982, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011
Lazio 7 1958, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013, 2019
Fiorentina 6 1940, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 2001
Napoli 6 1962, 1976, 1987, 2012, 2014, 2020
Torino 5 1936, 1943, 1968, 1971, 1993
Milan 5 1967, 1972, 1973, 1977, 2003
Sampdoria 4 1985, 1988, 1989, 1994
Parma 3 1992, 1999, 2002
Bologna 2 1970, 1974
Vado 1 1922
Genoa 1 1937
Venezia 1 1941
Atalanta 1 1963
Vicenza 1 1997
Total 73
Notes
  • The 1922 tournament was contested only by minor teams, the biggest clubs having left FIGC to form a private league of their own.
  • Although 74 tournaments have been contested, only 73 championships have been assigned. The 1926–27 tournament was cancelled in the round of 32.

FinalsEdit

In bold are the winners of the finals.

Club Finalists Finals years
Juventus 20 1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1973, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1992, 1995, 2002, 2004, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2020, 2021
Roma 17 1937, 1941, 1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 1993, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2013
Milan 14 1942, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1985, 1990, 1998, 2003, 2016, 2018
Torino 13 1936, 1938, 1943, 1963, 1964, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1988, 1993
Internazionale 13 1939, 1959, 1965, 1977, 1978, 1982, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011
Fiorentina 10 1940, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2014
Lazio 10 1958, 1961, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2019
Napoli 10 1962, 1972, 1976, 1978, 1987, 1989, 1997, 2012, 2014, 2020
Sampdoria 7 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2009
Atalanta 5 1963, 1987, 1996, 2019, 2021
Parma 5 1992, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2002
Palermo 3 1974, 1979, 2011
Hellas Verona 3 1976, 1983, 1984
Genoa 2 1937, 1940
Venezia 2 1941, 1943
Bologna 2 1970, 1974
Vado 1 1922
Udinese 1 1922
Alessandria 1 1936
Novara 1 1939
SPAL 1 1962
Catanzaro 1 1966
Padova 1 1967
Cagliari 1 1969
Ancona 1 1994
Vicenza 1 1997
Total 146
Notes
  • From 1968 to 1971, FIGC introduced a final group instead of semifinals and finals. For statistical equity, only champions and runners-up of those groups are counted as finalists.

Performance by playerEdit

Top appearancesEdit

Rank Player Period Games
1   Roberto Mancini 1981–2001 72
2   Roberto Baggio 1982–2004 65
  Fausto Salsano 1979–2000
4   Pietro Fanna 1975–1993 59
5   Alessandro Altobelli 1973–1990 55
  Gianluca Vialli 1980–1996
7   Paolo Pulici 1966–1985 54
8   Maurizio Ganz 1985–2007 52
  Nicola Caccia 1987–2005
10   Francesco Totti 1992–2017 46
  Pietro Paolo Virdis 1973–1991
12   Andrea Carnevale 1978–1996 45
  Oscar Damiani 1968–1986
  Daniele Massaro 1979–1989
15   Pietro Anastasi 1966–1981 44
  Giuseppe Giannini 1981–1996
1997–1999
17   Giancarlo Marocchi 1982–2000 43
18   Roberto Boninsegna 1963–1980 42
  Francesco Flachi 1993–2010
  Massimo Agostini 1982–2008
  Giuseppe Incocciati 1981–1995
22   Alessandro Del Piero 1993–2012 41
  Vincenzo D'Amico 1972–1988
  Domenico Caso 1971–1989

Top goalscorersEdit

Rank Player Club(s) Goals
1   Alessandro Altobelli Brescia, Internazionale, Juventus 56
2   Roberto Boninsegna Hellas Verona, Varese, Juventus, Cagliari, Internazionale 48
3   Giuseppe Savoldi Atalanta, Bologna, Napoli 47
4   Gianluca Vialli Cremonese, Sampdoria, Juventus 43
5   Bruno Giordano Lazio, Napoli, Ascoli, Bologna 38
  Paolo Pulici Torino, Udinese, Fiorentina
7   Roberto Baggio Vicenza, Fiorentina, Juventus, Milan, Bologna, Internazionale, Brescia 36
  Pietro Anastasi Varese, Juventus, Internazionale, Ascoli
9   Roberto Mancini Bologna, Sampdoria, Lazio 33
10   Luigi Riva Cagliari 32
11   Roberto Pruzzo Genoa, Roma, Fiorentina 30
12   Diego Maradona Napoli 29
13   Andrea Carnevale Avellino, Reggiana, Cagliari, Udinese, Napoli, Roma, Pescara 28
  Gianni Rivera Milan
15   Francesco Graziani Arezzo, Torino, Fiorentina, Roma, Udinese 27
16   Pierino Prati Milan, Roma 26
  Oscar Damiani Vicenza, Napoli, Juventus, Genoa, Milan, Parma
  Aldo Serena Bari, Internazionale, Milan, Juventus
19   Alessandro Del Piero Juventus 25
  Antonio Di Natale Empoli, Udinese
  Sandro Tovalieri Arezzo, Roma, Avellino, Ancona, Atalanta, Reggiana, Sampdoria
  Gabriel Batistuta Fiorentina, Roma

Most titlesEdit

Gianluigi Buffon and Roberto Mancini (6)[2]

Media coverageEdit

This is a list of television broadcasters which provide coverage of Coppa Italia, as well as the Supercoppa Italiana and maybe exclude the Serie A matches (depending on broadcasting rights in selected regions).

2021–2024Edit

ItalyEdit

The Supercoppa Italian and the Coppa Italia are currently aired by Mediaset from 2021–22 onwards. Previously, the tournament aired by the public broadcaster RAI until 2020–21 season.[3]

InternationalEdit

Selected matches of the Supercoppa and Coppa Italia are streamed through Serie A YouTube channel in the unsold markets with highlights available in all territories.[4]

Countries Broadcaster Ref
  Andorra DAZN [5]
  Austria
  Germany
  Japan
  Spain
  Bosnia and Herzegovina Arena Sport [6]
  Croatia
  Montenegro
  North Macedonia
  Serbia
  Slovenia
  Bulgaria Max Sport
  Cyprus Cytavision Sports
  Greece Nova Sports
  Ireland Premier Sports
  Israel Sport1 [7]
  Kosovo ArtMotion [8]
Kujtesa
  Malta TSN [7]
  Netherlands Ziggo Sport [7]
  Poland Polsat Sport
  Russia Okko Sport [7]
  Sub-Saharan Africa Startimes Sports
  Sweden Aftonbladet
  Turkey S Sport [7]
  Ukraine Football [7]
  United Kingdom Premier Sports
  United States CBS [9]

NotesEdit

TBA

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "TIM Cup – Sede di Gara Finale 2007/2008" (PDF) (in Italian). Lega Nazionale Professionisti. 2007-12-06. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 28, 2008.
  2. ^ "Buffon wins Coppa with Chiesa Senior and Junior". www.football-italia.net. 19 May 2021. Retrieved 19 May 2021.
  3. ^ "Coppa Italia: diritti tv in esclusiva a Mediaset - Sportmediaset". Sportmediaset.it (in Italian). Retrieved 13 July 2021.
  4. ^ "All Italian Cup games live and free on the Serie A youtube channel". SBS Your Language. Retrieved 22 June 2019.
  5. ^ "Dazn will broadcast the Coppa Italia in Spain and Germany". Italy24 News English. 12 May 2021. Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  6. ^ "Dazn will broadcast the Coppa Italia in Spain and Germany". Italy24 News English. 12 May 2021. Retrieved 18 July 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "COMUNICAZIONE DIRITTI AUDIOVISIVI INTERNAZIONALI STAGIONI SPORTIVE 2021/22, 2022/23, 2023/24" (PDF). legaseriea.it. 10 May 2021. Retrieved 31 July 2021.
  8. ^ "Copa di Italia ekskluzivisht në ArtMotion dhe Kujtesa". klankosova.tv. Klan Kosova. 18 June 2021. Retrieved 20 June 2021.
  9. ^ "Serie A is coming to Paramount+: CBS Sports acquires exclusive rights for Italian soccer beginning this summer". CBS Sports. Retrieved 18 July 2021.

External linksEdit