Hanna Ljungberg

Hanna Carolina Ljungberg (born 8 January 1979 in Umeå, Västerbotten) is a Swedish former football player, who played the position of forward. She played for the club side Umeå IK and for the Swedish national football team. She debuted for Sweden, at age 17, on 6 February 1996, when Sweden won 8-0 against Spain.

Hanna Ljungberg
Hanna Ljungberg.jpg
Hanna Ljungberg playing for Team Sweden against Team Denmark in November 2007
Personal information
Full name Hanna Carolina Ljungberg
Date of birth (1979-01-08) 8 January 1979 (age 41)
Place of birth Umeå, Sweden
Height 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in)
Playing position(s) Forward
Youth career
1986–1994 Mariehem SK
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1994–1998 Sunnanå SK
1998–2009 Umeå IK 227 (196)
National team
1996–2008 Sweden 130[1] (72[1])
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Ljungberg can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

CareerEdit

Hanna Ljungberg was one of several professional players in the Swedish women's league, Damallsvenskan. She was chosen as Swedish Player of the Year in 2002, winning the Diamond Ball (Diamantbollen).[2] She also scored a record setting number of goals that season with 39 goals (roughly 1.78 goals per game).[3] Ljungberg made altogether 227 league appearances for Umeå IK and scored 196 goals.

As a world class forward, Ljungberg was instrumental in the Swedish side that were runners up in the FIFA Women's World Cup 2003 held in the United States, scoring three goals and assisting another. She was also voted 3rd best World Player of the Year by FIFA in 2003. Until October 2014 when she was surpassed by Lotta Schelin, Ljungberg was the goal leader of the Swedish national team with 72 goals.[4] During the UEFA Women's Cup 2002-03, Ljungberg was the top goalscorer in the tournament with 10 goals.[5] Italian men's football club Perugia contacted Ljungberg to hire her for their Serie A roster, but the deal aborted.[6][7]

She debuted as a goalkeeper on 17 May 2007 for Umeå IK when they played against AIK in the Swedish Cup because of Carola Söberg's injury at the 70th minute. She ended the game with a clean sheet.[8] Her fame in Sweden has led to stamps commemorating her and several other Swedish footballers for the Swedish Football Association's 100th anniversary.[9]

In August 2009 Ljungberg announced her retirement from football after a knee injury in a league match on 5 July. The right anterior cruciate ligament, previously reconstructed in 2004, was again partly torn and she decided with her doctors that to continue to play presented too high a risk of permanent disability.

For two years Ljungberg helped Joakim Blomqvist, head coach of Umeå IK, and Maria Bergkvist assistant coach, in the coaching of her old team. At the same time she was studying at Umeå University to become a physiotherapist and graduated in June 2012. She then began a new career as a personal trainer.[10]

Matches and goals scored at World Cup & Olympic tournamentsEdit

Hanna Ljungberg featured for Sweden in three World Cups (USA 1999, USA 2003, China 2007) and three Olympic Games (Athens 1996, Sydney 2000, Athens 2004.) She scored Sweden's lone goal in the 2003 World Cup Final, where Sweden lost to Germany for a second place finish.[11]

Key (expand for notes on “world cup and olympic goals”)
Location Geographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
Lineup Start – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
(c) – captain

Min The minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/pass The ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pk Goal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
Score The match score after the goal was scored.
Result The final score.

W – match was won
L – match was lost to opponent
D – match was drawn
(W) – penalty-shoot-out was won after a drawn match
(L) – penalty-shoot-out was lost after a drawn match

aet The score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament
Goal Match Date Location Opponent Lineup Min Score Result Competition
 Atlanta 1996 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
1
1996-7-21[m 1] Miami   China PR 71.

on 71' (off Kalte)

0–2 L

Group match
2
1996-7-23[m 2] Orlando   United States 56.

on 56' (off Carlsson)

1–2 L

Group match
  USA 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup
3
1999-6-19[m 3] San Jose   China PR Start

1–2 L

Group match
1
4
1999-6-23[m 4] Washington, DC   Australia Start 21 2-0

3–1 W

Group match
2 69 3-1
5
1999-6-26[m 5] Chicago   Ghana 6.

off 6' (on Lundin)

2–0 W

Group match
 Sydney 2000 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
6
2000-9-13[m 6] Melbourne   Brazil Start

0–2 L

Group match
7
2000-9-16[m 7] Sydney   Australia Start

1–1 D

Group match
8
2000-9-19[m 8] Melbourne   Germany Start

0–1 L

Group match
  USA 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
9
2003-9-21[m 9] Washington, DC   United States 83.

off 83' (on Öqvist)

1–3 L

Group match
10
2003-9-25[m 10] Philadelphia   North Korea 86.

off 86' (on Öqvist)

1–0 W

Group match
3
11
2003-9-28[m 11] Columbus   Nigeria Start 56 1-0

3–0 W

Group match
4 79 2-0
12
2003-10-1[m 12] Foxborough   Brazil Start

2–1 W

Quarter Final
13
2003-10-5[m 13] Portland   Canada Start

2–1 W

Semi-Final
5
14
2003-10-12[m 14] Carson   Germany Start 41 1-0

1–2 L

Final
 Athens 2004 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
15
2004-8-11[m 15] Volos   Japan 68.

off 68' (on Öqvist)

0–1 L

Group match
16
2004-8-17[m 16] Volos   Nigeria 80.

off 80' (on Fagerström)

2–1 W

Group match
6
17
2004-8-20[m 17] Volos   Australia 77.

off 77' (on Fagerström)

25 1-0

2–1 W

Quarter-Final
18
2004-8-23[m 18] Patras   Brazil Start

0–1 L

Semi Final
19
2004-8-26[m 19] Piraeus   Germany Start

0–1 L

Bronze Medal Match
  China 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
20
2007-9-11[m 20] Chengdu   Nigeria 69.

off 69' (on Johansson)

1–1 D

Group match
21
2007-9-14[m 21] Chengdu   United States Start

0–2 L

Group match
22
2007-9-18[m 22] Tianjin   North Korea 40.

off 40' (on Thunebro)

2–1 W

Group match

Matches and goals scored at European Championship tournamentsEdit

Hanna Ljungberg appeared at three European Championship tournaments: Norway/Sweden 1997, Germany 2001, and England 2005. In the 2005 Semi-Final, she scored twice against Norway, erasing Norwegian leads each time. Her second goal in the 89th minute knotted the score at 2-2 and forced extra time. Sweden could not find a match winner though, and exited the tournament in a 2-3 defeat.[12]

Goal Match Date Location Opponent Lineup Min Score Result Competition
  1997 European Championship
1
1
1997-6-29[m 23] Karlstad   Russia off 46' 10 1-0

2–1 W

Group match
2
1997-7-2[m 24] Karlskoga   Spain off 46'

1–0 W

Group match
3
1997-7-5[m 25] Karlstad   France 45.

off 45' (on Jonsson)

3–0 W

Group match
 2001 European Championship
2
4
2001-6-23[m 26] Erfurt   Germany Start 14 1-0

1–3 L

Group match
3
5
2001-6-27[m 27] Jena   England Start 74 3-0

4–0 W

Group match
6
2001-6-30[m 28] Erfurt   Russia Start

1–0 W

Group match
7
2001-7-4[m 29] Ulm   Denmark Start

1–0 W

Semi-Final
8
2001-7-7[m 30] Ulm   Germany Start

0–1 L

Final
 2005 European Championship
4
9
2005-6-5[m 31] Blackpool   Denmark Start 21 1-0

1–1 D

Group match
10
2005-6-8[m 32] Blackpool   Finland Start

0–0 D

Group match
11
2005-6-11[m 33] Blackburn   England Start

1–0 W

Group match
5
12
2005-6-16[m 34] Warrington   Norway Start 42 1-1

2–3 L

Semi-Final
6 89 2-2

HonoursEdit

IndividualEdit

2001-02
  • Sweden: Female Forward of the Year (1):
2004-05
  • Damallsvenskan Top Goalscorer (1):
2001-02 (39 goals)
3rd Place: 2002-03

ClubEdit

  Umeå IK:

Champion (7): 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008
  • Svenska Cupen Damer:
Champion (4): 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007
Runners-up (2): 2005 ,2006
Champion (2): 2007, 2008
Runners-up (1): 2009
Champion (2): 2003, 2004 (did not play in final)
Runners-up (3): 2002, 2007, 2008

National TeamEdit

  Sweden:

Runners-up (1): 2003
Champion (1): 2001
3rd Place (3): 2002, 2006, 2007

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Caps and goals
  2. ^ "Diamantbollen" (in Swedish). Swedish Football Association. Archived from the original on 17 December 2011. Retrieved 17 December 2011.
  3. ^ Thorsten Frennstedt. "'Publik & Skytteliga 2002'". Svenskfotboll.se. Retrieved 2007-11-20.
  4. ^ Dutt, Sujay (29 October 2014). "Sjögran reaches 200 in Sweden loss to Germany". Stockholm: UEFA. Retrieved 1 November 2014.
  5. ^ Sébastien Duret. "'UEFA Club Championship (Women) 2002/03". rsssf.com. Retrieved 2007-12-07.
  6. ^ Jo Tuckman (2005-01-05). "'It's a man's game'". London: Guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 2007-10-17.
  7. ^ Dave Thrilling. "'Ljungberg off to Serie A'". Squarefootball.net. Archived from the original on 2007-12-24. Retrieved 2007-08-15.
  8. ^ Stefan Persson. "'Målsprutan blev målvakt – höll nollan'". Aftonbladet.se. Retrieved 2007-02-20.
  9. ^ Lukas Muller. "'Liedholm, Ljungberg and Ravelli featured on stamps celebrating 100 years of Swedish football'". BvDP.de. Archived from the original on February 6, 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-22.
  10. ^ Andersson, Freja (28 December 2012). "Hanna inledde en ny karriär". Idrottens Affärer. Retrieved 12 June 2013.
  11. ^ "Germany wins World Cup by beating Sweden". China Daily. 13 October 2003. Retrieved 15 December 2019.
  12. ^ Ashby, Kevin (19 June 2005). "2005: Official approval for EURO success". UEFA. Retrieved 15 December 2019.
  1. ^ "1996 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - China: Group Matches". FIFA.
  2. ^ "1996 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: USA - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  3. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: China - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  4. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Australia - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  5. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Ghana - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  6. ^ "2000 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - Brazil: Group Matches". FIFA.
  7. ^ "2000 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Australia - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  8. ^ "2000 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Germany - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  9. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA - Sweden: Group Matches". FIFA.
  10. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Sweden - Korea DPR: Group Matches". FIFA.
  11. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Sweden - Nigeria: Group Matches". FIFA.
  12. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Brazil - Sweden: Quarter-Final". FIFA.
  13. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Sweden - Canada: Semi-Final". FIFA.
  14. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany - Sweden: Final". FIFA.
  15. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - Japan: Group Matches". FIFA.
  16. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - Nigeria: Group Matches". FIFA.
  17. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - Australia: Quarter-Finals". FIFA.
  18. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Sweden - Brazil: Semi-Final". FIFA.
  19. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: MATCH Report: Germany - Sweden: Bronze Medal Match". FIFA.
  20. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Nigeria - Sweden: Group matches". FIFA.
  21. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Sweden - USA: Group matches". FIFA.
  22. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Korea DPR - Sweden: Group matches". FIFA.
  23. ^ "1997 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - Russia: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  24. ^ "1997 European Championship: MATCH Report: Spain - Sweden: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  25. ^ "1997 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - France: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  26. ^ "2001 European Championship: MATCH Report: Germany - Sweden: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  27. ^ "2001 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - England: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  28. ^ "2001 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - Russia: Group matches". worldfootball.net.
  29. ^ "2001 European Championship: MATCH Report: Denmark - Sweden: Semi-Final". worldfootball.net.
  30. ^ "2001 European Championship: MATCH Report: Germany - Sweden: Final". worldfootball.net.
  31. ^ "2005 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - Denmark: Group match". UEFA.
  32. ^ "2005 European Championship: MATCH Report: Sweden - Finland: Group match". UEFA.
  33. ^ "2005 European Championship: MATCH Report: England - Sweden: Group match". UEFA.
  34. ^ "2005 European Championship: MATCH Report: Norway - Sweden: Semi-Finals". UEFA.

External linksEdit