Gloucester County, New Jersey

Gloucester County (/ˈɡlɒstər/) is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2019 Census estimate, the county's population was 291,636, making it the state's 14th-most populous county,[2][3][4] an increase of 1.0% from the 2010 United States Census, when its population was enumerated at 288,288,[5] in turn an increase of 33,615 (+13.2%) from the 254,673 counted in the 2000 U.S. Census.[6] The percentage increase in the county's population between 2000 and 2010 was the largest in New Jersey, almost triple the statewide increase of 4.5%, and the absolute increase in residents was the third highest.[7][8] Its county seat is Woodbury.[1]

Gloucester County
Rowan College of South Jersey campus
Flag of Gloucester County
Flag
Official seal of Gloucester County
Seal
Map of New Jersey highlighting Gloucester County
Location within the U.S. state of New Jersey
Map of the United States highlighting New Jersey
New Jersey's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°43′N 75°08′W / 39.71°N 75.14°W / 39.71; -75.14Coordinates: 39°43′N 75°08′W / 39.71°N 75.14°W / 39.71; -75.14
Country United States
State New Jersey
Founded1686
Named forGloucester / Gloucestershire, England
SeatWoodbury[1]
Largest municipalityWashington Township (population)
Franklin Township (area)
Government
 • Commissioner directorRobert M. Damminger (D, term ends December 31, 2021)
Area
 • Total337.18 sq mi (873.3 km2)
 • Land322.00 sq mi (834.0 km2)
 • Water15.17 sq mi (39.3 km2)  4.50%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total288,288
 • Estimate 
(2019)
291,636
 • Density850/sq mi (330/km2)
Congressional districts1st, 2nd
Websitewww.co.gloucester.nj.us
Interactive map of Gloucester County, New Jersey

Gloucester County is located south of Philadelphia and northwest of Atlantic City. It is part of the Camden, New Jersey Metropolitan Division of the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area[9] as well as the Delaware Valley Combined Statistical Area.[10]

GeographyEdit

According to the 2010 Census, the county had a total area of 337.18 square miles (873.3 km2), including 322.00 square miles (834.0 km2) of land (95.5%) and 15.17 square miles (39.3 km2) of water (4.5%).[11]

Gloucester County is largely composed of low-lying rivers and coastal plains. The highest elevation in the county is a slight rise along County Route 654 southeast of Cross Keys that reaches approximately 180 feet (55 m) above sea level;[12] the lowest point is at sea level on the Delaware River.

Adjacent countiesEdit

National protected areaEdit

Climate and weatherEdit

Woodbury, New Jersey
Climate chart (explanation)
J
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J
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: The Weather Channel[13]

In recent years, average temperatures in the county seat of Woodbury have ranged from a low of 26 °F (−3 °C) in January to a high of 87 °F (31 °C) in July, although a record low of −11 °F (−24 °C) was recorded in February 1934 and a record high of 106 °F (41 °C) was recorded in August 1918. Average monthly precipitation ranged from 2.75 inches (70 mm) in February to 4.35 inches (110 mm) in July.[13] The county has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa). Average monthly temperatures in Newfield range from 33.0 °F in January to 76.6 °F in July. [1]

HistoryEdit

 
The old Gloucester County Courthouse in Woodbury

Swedesboro and Bridgeport were among the earliest European settlements in New Jersey as a part of the 17th century New Sweden colony. Gloucester dates back to May 26, 1686, when courts were established separate from those of Burlington. It was officially formed and its boundaries defined as part of West Jersey on May 17, 1694. Portions of Gloucester County were set off on February 7, 1837, to create Atlantic County, and on March 13, 1844 to create Camden County.[14] The county was named for the city of Gloucester / county of Gloucestershire in England.[15]

Woodbury, founded in 1683 by Henry Wood, is the oldest municipality in the county.[16] The municipality of National Park hosts the site of the Revolutionary War Battle of Red Bank where Fort Mercer once stood. It is now the site of Red Bank Battlefield Park and the remains of HMS Augusta laid there until they were moved and subsequently re-sunk in Gloucester City on their way to Philadelphia. During the colonial era, Gloucester County's main economic activity was agriculture. Woodbury was the site of the county courthouse, the county jail, a Quaker meeting house (still in existence), and an inn (on the current location of Woodbury Crossings). Because of the county's many creeks leading to the Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean, smuggling was very common.

In 2014, the county heroin death rate was 17.3 deaths per 100,000 people, the fourth-highest rate in New Jersey nearly seven times the national average.[17]

The Gloucester County Historical Society, founded in 1903, maintains a collection of materials and artifacts related to the history of South Jersey. The Hunter-Lawrence-Jessup House Museum in Woodbury, displays many of these artifacts.[18]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
179013,363
180016,11520.6%
181019,74422.5%
182023,08916.9%
183028,43123.1%
184025,438*−10.5%
185014,655*−42.4%
186018,44425.9%
187021,56216.9%
188025,88620.1%
189028,64910.7%
190031,90511.4%
191037,36817.1%
192048,22429.1%
193070,80246.8%
194072,2192.0%
195091,72727.0%
1960134,84047.0%
1970172,68128.1%
1980199,91715.8%
1990230,08215.1%
2000254,67310.7%
2010288,28813.2%
2019 (est.)291,636[19]1.2%
Historical sources: 1790–1990[20]
1970–2010[8] 2000[6] 2010[5]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[14]

2010 CensusEdit

The 2010 United States census counted 288,288 people, 104,271 households, and 75,805 families in the county. The population density was 895.3 per square mile (345.7/km2). There were 109,796 housing units at an average density of 341 per square mile (132/km2). The racial makeup was 83.56% (240,890) White, 10.06% (29,006) Black or African American, 0.17% (501) Native American, 2.64% (7,609) Asian, 0.03% (95) Pacific Islander, 1.41% (4,055) from other races, and 2.13% (6,132) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.76% (13,712) of the population.[5]

Of the 104,271 households, 33.4% had children under the age of 18; 55.6% were married couples living together; 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present and 27.3% were non-families. Of all households, 22% were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.2.[5]

24.4% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.7 years. For every 100 females, the population had 94.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.1 males.[5]

2000 CensusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census[21] there were 254,673 people, 90,717 households, and 67,221 families residing in the county. The population density was 784 people per square mile (303/km2). There were 95,054 housing units at an average density of 293 per square mile (113/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.07% White, 9.06% Black or African American, 0.19% Native American, 1.49% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. 2.58% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[6][22] Among those residents listing their ancestry, 26.9% were of Italian, 24.4% Irish, 22.9% German and 11.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000.[22][23]

There were 90,717 households, out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 23.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.22.[6]

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.40% under the age of 18, 8.90% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 22.60% from 45 to 64, and 11.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.20 males.[6]

The median income for a household in the county was $54,273, and the median income for a family was $62,482. Males had a median income of $43,825 versus $31,077 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,708. Around 4.3% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.6% of those under age 18 and 7.0% of those age 65 or over.[22][24]

EconomyEdit

Based on data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, Gloucester County had a gross domestic product (GDP) of $14.4 billion in 2018, which was ranked 14th in the state and represented an increase of 1.3% from the previous year.[25]

GovernmentEdit

Gloucester County is governed by a board of county commissioners, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. In 2017, commissioners (then called freeholders) were paid $16,908 and the director was paid an annual salary of $17,908.[26] As of 2021, Gloucester County's Commissioners are Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; 2021),[27] Deputy Director Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2022),[28] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2023),[29] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2022),[30] Jim Jefferson (D, Woodbury; 2023),[31] Jim Lavender (D, Woolwich Township; 2021),[32] and Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2023).[33][34]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[35] Gloucester County's constitutional officers are: County Clerk James N. Hogan (D, Franklinville in Franklin Township; 5-year term ends 2022),[36][37][38] Sheriff Carmel Morina (D, Greenwich Township; 3-year term ends 2021)[39][40][41] and Surrogate Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 5-year term ends 2022).[42][43][44][38][45][41]

The Acting Gloucester County Prosecutor is Christine A. Hoffman, who was appointed in March 2020 to succeed Charles A. Fiore.[46]

Gloucester County is a part of Vicinage 15 of the New Jersey Superior Court (along with Cumberland and Salem counties), seated in Woodbury in Gloucester County; the Assignment Judge for the vicinage is Benjamin C. Telsey. The Gloucester County Courthouse is in Woodbury.[47]

Federal RepresentativesEdit

Gloucester County is included in the 1st and 2nd Congressional Districts.[48][49] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[50][51] For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[52]

State RepresentativesEdit

District Senator[53] Assembly [53] Municipalities
3rd Stephen M. Sweeney (D) John J. Burzichelli (D)

Adam Taliaferro (D)

Clayton, East Greenwich Township, Elk Township, Franklin Township, Glassboro, Greenwich Township,

Logan Township, National Park, Newfield, Paulsboro, South Harrison Township,

Swedesboro, West Deptford Township, Woodbury Heights and Woolwich Township.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Cumberland County and all of Salem County.

4th Fred H. Madden (D) Paul Moriarty (D)

Gabriela Mosquera (D)

Monroe Township, Pitman Borough and Washington Township.

The remainder of this district covers portions of Camden County.

5th Nilsa Cruz-Perez (D) William Spearman (D)

Bill Moen (D)

Deptford Township, Harrison Township, Mantua Township, Wenonah, Westville and Woodbury.

The remainder of this district includes portions of Camden County,


The county is part of the 3rd, 4th and 5th Districts in the New Jersey Legislature

The county leans toward the Democratic Party, though to a slightly lesser degree than the state of New Jersey as a whole. In the 2004 U.S. presidential election, John Kerry carried Gloucester County by a 5.3% margin over George W. Bush, while Kerry carried the state by 6.7% over Bush.[54]

In the 2008 U.S. presidential election, Barack Obama carried Gloucester County by a 12.2% margin over John McCain, while Obama carried the state by 15.5% over McCain.[55] However, in the 2009 Gubernatorial Election, Republican Chris Christie received 47% of the vote, defeating Democrat Jon Corzine, who received around 43%. In 2016, Donald Trump became the first Republican to win Gloucester County since 1988 when George H.W. Bush won it; 1988 was the last year a Republican won New Jersey's electoral votes as well. However, a year later, Gloucester County narrowly opted for Democrat Phil Murphy over Republican Kim Guadagno in the gubernatorial election. In the 2020 Presidential Election, Democrat Joe Biden was declared victor in the county.

As of August 1, 2020, there were 219,937 registered voters in Gloucester County, of whom 87,924 (40%) were registered as Democrats, 52,376 (23.8%) were registered as Republicans and 76,930 (35%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2,707 (1.2%) voters registered to other parties.[56]

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[57]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2020 48.1% 83,340 50.0% 86,702 2.0% 3,411
2016 47.8% 67,544 47.3% 66,870 4.8% 6,840
2012 43.9% 59,456 54.6% 74,013 1.6% 2,101
2008 43.1% 60,315 55.2% 77,267 1.7% 2,364
2004 46.9% 60,033 52.2% 66,835 0.9% 1,096
2000 39.4% 42,315 56.9% 61,095 3.6% 3,888
1996 32.0% 32,116 51.7% 51,915 16.4% 16,464
1992 35.7% 37,335 40.6% 42,425 23.8% 24,859
1988 58.7% 51,708 40.3% 35,479 1.1% 930
1984 62.1% 54,041 37.6% 32,702 0.4% 307
1980 51.1% 40,306 37.8% 29,804 11.2% 8,793
1976 46.3% 34,888 51.4% 38,726 2.2% 1,688
1972 62.9% 44,806 35.8% 25,509 1.3% 894
1968 44.5% 30,596 39.9% 27,438 15.6% 10,697
1964 37.0% 23,702 62.9% 40,305 0.1% 45
1960 52.2% 32,474 47.8% 29,752 0.1% 33
1956 60.4% 30,646 39.4% 20,007 0.2% 75
1952 54.9% 25,103 44.9% 20,536 0.2% 98
1948 54.5% 19,477 44.1% 15,785 1.4% 503
1944 48.3% 16,684 51.4% 17,758 0.3% 113
1940 46.4% 17,674 53.2% 20,284 0.4% 153
1936 43.2% 15,813 56.0% 20,516 0.8% 293
1932 56.0% 18,782 41.2% 13,817 2.9% 962
1928 79.3% 25,627 20.4% 6,594 0.3% 81
1924 72.7% 15,513 19.5% 4,167 7.7% 1,648
1920 66.6% 11,693 27.7% 4,869 5.7% 995
1916 54.8% 5,352 38.4% 3,745 6.8% 665
1912 21.1% 1,856 38.3% 3,364 40.6% 3,566[58]
1908 56.4% 5,318 39.3% 3,706 4.3% 409
1904 59.1% 4,829 34.5% 2,818 6.3% 518
1900 57.6% 4,471 36.4% 2,828 6.0% 463
1896 59.0% 4,727 37.2% 2,981 3.7% 301
County CPVI: D+3

TransportationEdit

Roads and highwaysEdit

As of 2010, the county had 1,698.59 miles (2,733.62 km) of roadways, of which 1,126.99 miles (1,813.71 km) were maintained by the local municipality, 406.47 miles (654.15 km) by Gloucester County and 145.11 miles (233.53 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, 2.22 miles (3.57 km) by the Delaware River Port Authority, 1.09 miles (1.75 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority and 16.71 miles (26.89 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[59]

Various county, state, U.S. routes and interstates pass through the county. Major county highways include County Road 534, County Road 536, County Road 538, County Road 544, County Road 551, County Road 553, County Road 555 and County Road 557.

State Routes include Route 41, Route 42 (part of the North-South Freeway), Route 45, Route 47, Route 55, Route 77, Route 168 and Route 324 (only in Logan). The three U.S. routes that traverse include U.S. Route 130 in the northwest, U.S. Route 322 near the center, and U.S. Route 40 in the southern tip.

The Commodore Barry Bridge carries U.S. Route 322 between Chester, PA and Logan.

Interstate 295 is the only Interstate in the county which also runs through the northwest for about 14 miles (23 km). The New Jersey Turnpike also passes through in the northwest. Only one turnpike interchange is located within Gloucester: Exit 2 in Woolwich.

Public transportationEdit

NJ Transit bus service between the county and the Philadelphia Greyhound Terminal is available on the 313 and 315 routes; to Philadelphia on the 400, 401 (from Salem), 402 (from Pennsville Township), 403, 408, 410 (from Bridgeton) and 412 (from Sewell) routes, with local service offered on the 455 (Cherry Hill to Paulsboro) and 463 (between Woodbury and the Avandale Park/Ride in Winslow Township) routes.[60][61]

The Glassboro–Camden Line is a proposed 18-mile (28.97 km) diesel multiple unit (DMU) light rail system that is planned to connect with the River LINE and PATCO Speedline in Camden and was previously anticipated to be in operation in 2019.[62][63] The lack of both an official project sponsor and identified funding source(s), have delayed the start of construction, making the 2019 timeframe unrealistic.

Located within the Conrail South Jersey/Philadelphia Shared Assets Area.[64] freight rail in the county travels along Penns Grove Secondary, the Salem Branch, and the Vineland Secondary. SMS Rail Lines handles interchanges with CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway.

PortEdit

The Port of Paulsboro is located on the Delaware River and Mantua Creek in and around Paulsboro. Traditionally one of the nation's busiest for marine transfer operations of petroleum products, the port is being redeveloped as an adaptable omniport able to handle bulk, break bulk cargo and shipping containers. Studies completed in 2012[65][66] concluded that the port is well suited to become a center for the manufacture, assembly, and transport of wind turbines and platforms the development of wind power in New Jersey.[67][68][69][70][71][72]

MunicipalitiesEdit

 
Index map of Gloucester County municipalities (click to see index key)
 
Interactive map of municipalities in Gloucester County

The following municipalities in Gloucester County (with 2010 Census data for population, housing units and area) are:[73]

Municipality
(with map key)
Map key Municipal
type
Pop. Housing
Units
Total
Area
Water
Area
Land
Area
Pop.
Density
Housing
Density
School
District
Communities[74]
Clayton 2 borough 8,179 3,128 7.33 0.19 7.14 1,145.5 438.1 Clayton
Deptford
Township
20 township 30,561 12,361 17.61 0.25 17.36 1,760.3 712.0 Deptford Almonesson
Good Intent
Oak Valley CDP (3,483)
East Greenwich
Township
15 township 9,555 3,405 14.92 0.48 14.44 661.7 235.8 Kingsway (7-12)
East Greenwich (PK-6)
Mount Royal
Mickleton
Wolfert
Elk Township 24 township 4,216 1,576 19.69 0.19 19.49 216.3 80.8 Delsea (7-12)
Elk Township (PK-6)
Franklin
Township
23 township 16,820 6,104 56.47 0.56 55.91 300.9 109.2 Delsea (7-12)
Franklin Township (K-6)
Franklinville
Malaga
Glassboro 3 borough 18,579 6,590 9.22 0.04 9.18 2,022.9 717.5 Glassboro
Greenwich
Township
13 township 4,899 2,048 12.03 3.06 8.97 546.2 228.3 Paulsboro (9-12) (S/R)
Greenwich Township (K-8)
Billingsport
Gibbstown CDP (3,739)
Harrison
Township
18 township 12,417 4,089 19.23 0.09 19.14 648.7 213.6 Clearview (7-12)
Harrison Township (PK-6)
Mullica Hill CDP (3,982)
Richwood CDP (3,400, part)
Ewan
Logan Township 12 township 6,042 2,172 26.93 5.00 21.93 275.6 99.1 Kingsway (7-12) (S/R)
Logan (PK-6)
Beckett CDP (4,847)
Bridgeport
Repaupo
Mantua
Township
19 township 15,217 5,980 15.92 0.07 15.85 960.1 377.3 Clearview (7-12)
Mantua Township (PK-6)
Richwood CDP (59, part)
Sewell
Monroe
Township
22 township 36,129 13,387 46.93 0.53 46.39 778.8 288.6 Monroe Township Cross Keys
New Brooklyn
Victory Lakes CDP (2,111)
Williamstown CDP (15,567)
National Park 9 borough 3,036 1,153 1.45 0.45 1.00 3,023.2 1,148.1 Gateway (7-12)
National Park (PK-6)
Newfield 1 borough 1,553 626 1.71 0.00 1.70 912.0 367.6 Delsea (7-12)
Franklin Township (K-6) (S/R)
Paulsboro 10 borough 6,097 2,533 2.60 0.71 1.90 3,216.4 1,336.2 Paulsboro
Pitman 4 borough 9,011 3,705 2.31 0.04 2.27 3,976.1 1,634.8 Pitman
South Harrison
Township
17 township 3,162 1,056 15.73 0.05 15.68 201.7 67.4 Kingsway (7-12)
South Harrison (K-6)
Harrisonville
Swedesboro 11 borough 2,584 1,004 0.76 0.03 0.72 3,568.4 1,386.5 Kingsway (7-12)
Swedesboro-Woolwich (K-6)
Washington
Township
21 township 48,559 17,810 21.60 0.22 21.38 2,271.0 833.0 Washington Township Grenloch
Hurffville
Turnersville CDP (3,742)
Wenonah 5 borough 2,278 860 0.98 0.01 0.97 2,342.8 884.4 Gateway (7-12)
Wenonah (K-6)
West Deptford
Township
14 township 21,677 9,441 17.87 2.45 15.41 1,406.6 612.6 West Deptford Colonial Manor
Greenfields Village
Red Bank
Thorofare
Westville 8 borough 4,288 1,912 1.38 0.35 1.02 4,187.0 1,867.0 Gateway (7-12)
Westville (PK-6)
Woodbury 7 city 10,174 4,456 2.06 0.05 2.01 5,064.0 2,217.9 Woodbury
Woodbury Heights 6 borough 3,055 1,125 1.23 0.01 1.22 2,499.4 920.4 Gateway (7-12)
Woodbury Heights (PK-6)
Woolwich
Township
16 township 10,200 3,275 21.23 0.32 20.91 487.8 156.6 Kingsway (7-12)
Swedesboro-Woolwich (K-6)
Gloucester County county 288,288 109,796 337.18 15.17 322.01 895.3 341.0

Emergency servicesEdit

Gloucester County is home to the first county-based EMS agency in New Jersey providing services to the municipalities of Logan Township, Woolwich Township, Swedesboro, East Greenwich Township, Greenwich Township, Paulsboro, West Deptford Township, National Park, Mantua Township, Pitman, Glassboro, Clayton, Woodbury, South Harrison Township, Wenonah, Harrison Township, Franklin Township, Newfield, Woodbury Heights, Westville, Elk Township, and Deptford Township.[75] GCEMS was started in September 2007; its goal is to provide emergency medical services to the residents of the county within nine minutes from the time of dispatch 90% of the time (considered to be the gold standard in EMS). Currently GCEMS has twelve ambulances in service around the clock and three "power shift" ambulances on duty from the hours of 8AM to 8PM seven days a week. Further, GCEMS operates three QRV (Quick Response Vehicle) units which are located in West Deptford, Newfield, and South Harrison. The department operates out of sixteen stations spread strategically throughout the county. The Gloucester County EMS administrative offices are located at the county's Emergency Response Center at 1200 N. Delsea Drive, Clayton, New Jersey 08312.[76] It was the winner of the 2010 Outstanding Public EMS Agency by the State of New Jersey.[77]

Gloucester County SWAT is a multi-jurisdictional team, composed of police officers from departments within the county. Officers are on-call 24/7 for emergency situations such as barricaded subjects, suicidal subjects and hostage rescue. They also provide high-risk warrant service, dignitary protection and counter-terrorism response.[78]

EducationEdit

Unified school districtsEdit

School districts in the county include the Gloucester County Vocational-Technical School District, with its one school being the Gloucester County Institute of Technology, which operates as a four-year vocational-technical high school that serves students from across the county.[79]

Colleges and universitiesEdit

Rowan University in Glassboro, is a public university that was founded in 1923 as Glassboro Normal School on a 25-acre (10 ha) site donated by the borough.[80] After a series of alternative titles over the years, in 1992 the school was renamed Rowan College of New Jersey after Henry Rowan and his wife Betty gave the school $100 million, at the time the largest gift to a public college.[81] It became Rowan University on March 21, 1997, when it won approval for university status from the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education.[82] The Cold War Glassboro Summit Conference between U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin took place from June 23–25, 1967, in Hollybush Mansion. The site was chosen because of its location equidistant between New York City, where Kosygin would be making a speech at the United Nations, and Washington, D.C.[83]

The county college is Rowan College of South Jersey, having been established in 1966 as Gloucester County College and first opening to students two years later.[84]

WineriesEdit

Notable peopleEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b New Jersey County Map, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed July 10, 2017.
  2. ^ QuickFacts – Gloucester County, New Jersey; New Jersey; United States, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  3. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2018 - 2018 Population Estimates Archived February 13, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  4. ^ GCT-PEPANNCHG: Estimates of Resident Population Change and Rankings: July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017 - State -- County / County Equivalent from the 2017 Population Estimates for New Jersey Archived February 13, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 24, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e DP1 – Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Gloucester County, New Jersey Archived February 13, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 26, 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e DP-1 – Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000; Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 30, 2013.
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