Chanda Rubin

Chanda Rubin (born February 18, 1976) is an American former top 10 professional tennis player. During her career, she reached the semifinals at the 1996 Australian Open, the quarterfinals of the French Open three times, and had wins over world number ones Serena Williams and Martina Hingis. In doubles, she won the 1996 Australian Open with Arantxa Sánchez Vicario and was runner-up at the 1999 US Open with Sandrine Testud.

Chanda Rubin
Chanda Rubin at the 2010 US Open 01.jpg
Chanda Rubin playing in the U.S. Open Champions Team Tennis September 9, 2010
Country (sports)United States United States
ResidenceLafayette, Louisiana
Born (1976-02-18) February 18, 1976 (age 44)
Lafayette, Louisiana
Height1.68 m (5 ft 6 in)
Turned proAugust 1991
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$4,469,990
Singles
Career record399–254
Career titles7 WTA, 2 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 6 (April 8, 1996)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenSF (1996)
French OpenQF (1995, 2000, 2003)
Wimbledon4R (2002)
US Open4R (1992, 1995, 2002)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsRR (2003)
Olympic Games3R (2004)
Doubles
Career record226–160
Career titles10 WTA, 3 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 9 (April 15, 1996)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenW (1996)
French OpenSF (2003)
WimbledonSF (2002)
US OpenF (1999)
Other doubles tournaments
Olympic Games1R (2004)

Early life and familyEdit

Rubin was born to Edward D. Rubin, a state judge in Louisiana, and Bernadette Fontenot Rubin. She was the middle child of three siblings.[1] As a child, she was taught the sport of tennis by Nehemiah Atkinson.[2]

She married Mireyou Hollier in April 2015 and their daughter was born in October 2016.[3]

In early 2016, her younger brother - Edward Rubin Jr. - died aged 38 at his home in Lafayette, Louisiana.[4]

Tennis careerEdit

In 1992, Rubin won the girls' singles title at Wimbledon, and reached a peak ranking of world number 2 in the ITF Junior rankings.

Rubin's breakthrough season on the women's tour was 1995. In the third round of the French Open, Rubin came from 0–5, 0–40 down in the third set against Jana Novotná, saving nine match points, before winning 8-6. In the second round of Wimbledon, Rubin defeated Patricia Hy-Boulais 7–6, 6–7, 17–15, the longest women's match in Wimbledon history. At LA Women's Tennis Championships in August, she defeated Gabriela Sabatini and world no. 2 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario on her way to the final.

In 1996, Rubin reached the Australian Open semifinals, defeating Gabriela Sabatini in the fourth round and then Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 6–4, 2–6, 16–14 in the quarterfinals. The 48 games played in their quarterfinal are the most for a women's match at the Australian Open (tied in 2018). Rubin lost in the semifinals to Monica Seles 6–7, 6–1, 7–5, despite holding a 5–2 lead in the third set. Rubin rose to a career-high ranking of No. 6, after reaching the final of the Lipton Championships in 1996 where she lost to Steffi Graf. However, after fracturing a bone in her right hand in Miami, Rubin underwent surgery and missed the majority of the rest of the season.[5]

Representing the USA, Rubin won the Hopman Cup alongside Justin Gimelstob. She remained undefeated through three ties and the final in her singles matches. At the Linz Open, Rubin defeated world no. 4 Jana Novotna on the way to her first singles title.

In Indian Wells in 1999, Rubin defeated both Amanda Coetzer and world no. 1 Martina Hingis in straight sets on her way to the semifinals. She also won her second career title at the Hobart International.

Rubin underwent arthroscopic surgery on her left knee in 2001 after the Australian Open, and then suffered a left Achilles tendon injury in April, thereby missing the majority of the season [6]

In 2002, Rubin underwent surgery on her left knee again, missing the first half of the season. In August, she defeated Lindsay Davenport, Jelena Dokic and the world no. 1 Serena Williams on her way to the title in Los Angeles. Her upset of Williams ended the top-ranked player's winning streak of 21 matches, a stretch that had carried Williams through titles at the French Open and Wimbledon.

At the Miami Open in 2003, Rubin beat both Amélie Mauresmo and Justine Henin in straight sets on her way to the semi-finals, after which she peaked again at world no. 6 in the rankings. She reached her third and final French Open quarterfinal, and also won the Eastbourne International title for a second time, defeating Jennifer Capriati in the semifinals and Conchita Martinez in the final. It would be Rubin's last career title.

Rubin missed the majority of the 2004-2006 seasons due to the persistent knee injury. Her last professional match was in October 2006 in Quebec City.[7]

She was inducted into the Southern Tennis Hall of Fame in 2009, and the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 2013.[8]

Post-RetirementEdit

In 2013, Rubin completed a four year Bachelor of Economics degree at Harvard University, graduating cum laude.[9]

In recent years, she has developed a career in broadcasting, working for Tennis Channel as a presenter and commentator.[10]

AwardsEdit

Grand Slam finalsEdit

Doubles: 2 (1–1)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1996 Australian Open   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario   Lindsay Davenport
  Mary Joe Fernández
7–5, 2–6, 6–4
Runner-up 1999 US Open   Sandrine Testud   Serena Williams
  Venus Williams
6–4, 1–6, 4–6

WTA career finalsEdit

Singles: 19 (7–12)Edit

Result W/L Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Loss 1. Nov 1991 Scottsdale, US Hard   Sabine Appelmans 5–7, 1–6
Loss 2. Feb 1994 Chicago, US Hard (i)   Natasha Zvereva 3–6, 5–7
Loss 3. Jun 1995 Eastbourne, UK Grass   Nathalie Tauziat 6–3, 0–6, 5–7
Loss 4. Aug 1995 Manhattan Beach, US Hard   Conchita Martínez 6–4, 1–6, 3–6
Loss 5. Mar 1996 Key Biscayne, US Hard   Steffi Graf 1–6, 3–6
Win 1. Feb 1997 Linz, Austria Hard (i)   Karina Habšudová 6–4, 6–2
Loss 6. Nov 1998 Quebec City, Canada Carpet (i)   Tara Snyder 6–4, 4–6, 6–7(6–8)
Win 2. Jan 1999 Hobart, Australia Hard   Rita Grande 6–2, 6–3
Loss 7. Nov 1999 Quebec City, Canada Carpet (i)   Jennifer Capriati 6–4, 1–6, 2–6
Loss 8. Jan 2000 Hobart, Australia Hard   Kim Clijsters 6–2, 2–6, 2–6
Win 3. Nov 2000 Quebec City, Canada Carpet (i)   Jennifer Capriati 6–4, 6–2
Loss 9. May 2002 Madrid, Spain Clay   Monica Seles 4–6, 2–6
Win 4. Jun 2002 Eastbourne, UK Grass   Anastasia Myskina 6–1, 6–3
Win 5. Aug 2002 Los Angeles, US Hard   Lindsay Davenport 5–7, 7–6(7–5), 6–3
Win 6. May 2003 Madrid, Spain Clay   María Sánchez Lorenzo 6–4, 5–7, 6–4
Win 7. Jun 2003 Eastbourne, UK Grass   Conchita Martínez 6–4, 3–6, 6–4
Loss 10. Sep 2003 Bali, Indonesia Hard   Elena Dementieva 2–6, 1–6
Loss 11. Sep 2003 Shanghai, China Hard   Elena Dementieva 3–6, 6–7(6–8)
Loss 12. Oct 2003 Luxembourg City, Luxembourg Hard (i)   Kim Clijsters 2–6, 5–7

Doubles: 17 (10–7)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam (1–1)
WTA Championships (0–0)
Tier I (1–1)
Tier II (5–3)
Tier III (1–2)
Tier IV (2–0)
Result W/L Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1. Sep 1993 Tokyo, Japan Hard   Lisa Raymond   Amanda Coetzer
  Linda Wild
6–4, 6–1
Win 2. Jan 1994 Hobart, Australia Hard   Linda Wild   Jenny Byrne
  Rachel McQuillan
7–5, 4–6, 7–6
Loss 1. Nov 1994 Quebec City, Canada Carpet (i)   Linda Wild   Elna Reinach
  Nathalie Tauziat
4–6, 3–6
Win 3. May 1995 Prague, Czech Republic Clay   Linda Wild   Maria Lindström
  Maria Strandlund
6–7, 6–3, 6–2
Loss 2. Oct 1995 Zürich, Switzerland Hard (i)   Caroline Vis   Nicole Arendt
  Manon Bollegraf
4–6, 6–7(4–7), 4–6
Win 4. Jan 1996 Australian Open, Melbourne Hard   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario   Lindsay Davenport
  Mary Joe Fernández
7–5, 2–6, 6–4
Win 5. Feb 1996 Oklahoma City, US Hard (i)   Brenda Schultz-McCarthy   Katrina Adams
  Debbie Graham
6–4, 6–3
Win 6. Mar 1996 Indian Wells, US Hard   Brenda Schultz-McCarthy   Julie Halard-Decugis
  Nathalie Tauziat
6–1, 6–4
Win 7. Apr 1996 Amelia Island, US Clay   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario   Meredith McGrath
  Larisa Neiland
6–1, 6–1
Loss 3. Sep 1997 Tokyo, Japan Hard   Julie Halard-Decugis   Monica Seles
  Ai Sugiyama
1–6, 0–6
Loss 4. Oct 1998 Quebec City, Canada Carpet (i)   Sandrine Testud   Lori McNeil
  Kimberly Po
7–6(7–3), 5–7, 4–6
Loss 5. Sep, 1999 US Open Hard   Sandrine Testud   Serena Williams
  Venus Williams
6–4, 1–6, 4–6
Win 8. Oct 1999 Filderstadt, Germany Hard (i)   Sandrine Testud   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
  Larisa Neiland
6–3, 6–4
Loss 6. Nov 1999 Philadelphia, US Carpet (i)   Sandrine Testud   Lisa Raymond
  Rennae Stubbs
1–6, 6–7(2–7)
Win 9. Jul 2000 Stanford, US Hard   Sandrine Testud   Cara Black
  Amy Frazier
6–4, 6–4
Win 10. Oct 2000 Linz, Austria Carpet (i)   Amélie Mauresmo   Ai Sugiyama
  Nathalie Tauziat
6–4, 6–4
Loss 7. Oct 2001 Linz, Austria Hard (i)   Els Callens   Jelena Dokić
  Nadia Petrova
1–6, 4–6

Grand Slam singles performance timelineEdit

Tournament 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Career SR
Australian Open A A 1R 1R 4R 2R SF 4R 1R 4R 2R 1R A 4R 4R A A A 0 / 12
French Open A Q2 1R A 1R QF A 2R 4R 2R QF A 4R QF A Q1 A A 0 / 9
Wimbledon A Q1 1R 2R 1R 3R A 1R 3R 1R 1R 1R 4R 3R 1R A A A 0 / 12
US Open 1R 2R 4R 3R 1R 4R A 1R 2R 1R 3R 3R 4R 1R 3R A 1R A 0 / 15
Grand Slam SR 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 48
WTA Tour Championships A A A A A 1R A A A A 1R A 1R RR A A A A 0 / 4
Year-end ranking 521 83 83 69 23 15 17 30 34 22 13 54 13 9 53 546 481 NR
  • A=did not participate in the tournament
  • SR=the ratio of the number of tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played

Wins over Top 10 playersEdit

Season 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Total
Wins 5 4 2 0 2 1 0 4 4 22
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score Rubin
Rank
1995
1.   Jana Novotna 5 French Open Clay Third Round 7-6, 4-6, 8-6 53
2.   Kimiko Date 6 Eastbourne International, UK Grass Quarterfinals 6-3, 6-0 29
3.   Gabriela Sabatini 8 Manhattan Beach, USA Hard Quarterfinals 6-7, 7-6, 6-0 22
4.   Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario 2 Manhattan Beach, USA Hard Semifinal 6-3, 6-1 22
5.   Lindsay Davenport 9 Filderstadt, Germany Carpet 3rd Round 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 15
1996
6.   Gabriela Sabatini 7 Australian Open Hard R16 6-2, 6-4 14
7.   Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario 3 Australian Open Hard Quarterfinals 6-4, 2-6, 16-14 14
8.   Gabriela Sabatini 6 Miami, USA Hard Quarterfinals 6-3, 5-7, 6-3 9
9.   Iva Majoli 8 Philadelphia, USA Carpet Third Round 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 14
1997
10.   Jana Novotna 4 Linz, Austria Carpet Semifinals 7-5, 5-7, 6-3 22
11.   Karina Habsudova 10 Linz, Austria Carpet Final 6-4, 6-2 22
1999
12.   Amanda Coetzer 9 Indian Wells, USA Hard R16 6-4, 6-4 26
13.   Martina Hingis 1 Indian Wells, USA Hard Quarterfinals 6-3, 7-6 26
2000
14.   Nathalie Tauziat 6 French Open Clay Third Round 6-4, 7-6 25
2002
15.   Serena Williams 1 Los Angeles, USA Hard Quarterfinals 6-2, 4-6, 7-5 21
16.   Jelena Dokic 5 Los Angeles, USA Hard Semifinals 6-0, 6-2 21
17.   Lindsay Davenport 9 Los Angeles, USA Hard Final 5-7, 7-6, 6-3 21
18.   Jelena Dokic 8 Linz, Austria Hard Quarterfinals 7-5, 6-2 14
2003
19.   Amelie Mauresmo 4 Miami, USA Hard Fourth Round 6-3, 6-2 10
20.   Justine Henin 7 Miami, USA Hard Quarterfinals 6-0, 6-2 10
21.   Jennifer Capriati 8 Eastbourne International, UK Grass Semifinals 2-6, 7-6, 6-2 7
22.   Amelie Mauresmo 6 WTA Finals Hard Semifinals 4-6, 6-4, 6-2 10

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Judge Edward D. Rubin, Division D". 15th Judicial District of Louisiana. Retrieved September 22, 2014.
  2. ^ Lyman, Tim. "Jumping the Net". nola.com. Georges Media Group. Retrieved January 10, 2020.
  3. ^ Henley, Blair (December 9, 2016). "DRIVEN TO SUCCEED: CHANDA RUBIN IS ON A MISSION TO KEEP GROWING TENNIS". Tennis Magazine (Online). Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  4. ^ "Edward Rubin Jr., son of Lafayette judge, dies". Daily Advertiser. March 3, 2016. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  5. ^ "WTA Profile Page: Chanda Rubin". WTA Website. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  6. ^ "WTA Profile Page: Chanda Rubin". WTA Website. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  7. ^ "WTA Profile Page: Chanda Rubin". WTA Website. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  8. ^ Cioffi, Ron. "USTA Southern Director, Communications". Southern Tennis Foundation. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  9. ^ "Life after Professional Tennis". Harvard Extension School. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  10. ^ "FORMER WTA STAR CHANDA RUBIN HAS DIFFERENT ROLE AS TENNIS CHANNEL COMMENTATOR". WTA Volvo Car Cup. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  11. ^ "Chanda Rubin: Director at Large". USTA Website. Retrieved July 9, 2020.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Mary Pierce
WTA Most Improved Player of the Year
1995
Succeeded by
Martina Hingis