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Katrina Adams (born August 5, 1968) is a former professional American tennis player from Chicago. She is the immediate past President and CEO of the United States Tennis Association, Chairperson of the US Open and Chairperson of the Fed Cup. Adams was a doubles specialist, reaching the quarterfinal stage or better at all four Grand Slams as well as achieving a career-high doubles ranking of no. 8 (August 1989).

Katrina Adams
Katrina Adams.jpg
Country (sports)United States
ResidenceBradenton, Florida / White Plains, New York, United States
Born (1968-08-05) August 5, 1968 (age 50)
Chicago, Illinois
Turned pro1988
Retired1999
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$1,292,658
Singles
Career record182–194
Career titles1 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 67 (May 8, 1989)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open3R (1992)
French Open1R (1988, 1989, 1992, 1996)
Wimbledon4R (1988)
US Open3R (1995)
Doubles
Career record419–226
Career titles20 WTA, 7 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 8 (August 14, 1989)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian OpenQF (1992)
French OpenQF (1988, 1989, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996)
WimbledonSF (1988)
US OpenQF (1991, 1994)

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Adams joined a tennis program on Chicago's West Side when she was six years old. She attended Whitney Young High School, becoming Illinois High School Association singles champion in 1983 and 1984,[1] and Northwestern University. After winning the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) doubles title with Diane Donnelly in 1987,[2] she was twice voted All-American.[3]

ResultsEdit

Adams won seven of her 20 WTA doubles titles between 1987 and 1996 partnering Zina Garrison, including the 1988 World Doubles Championships.[4]

Her best Grand Slam singles result was in the 1988 Wimbledon Championships when she reached the fourth round, losing to Chris Evert 5–7 6–3 6–0. The same year, she was Wimbledon doubles semifinalist with Zina Garrison.

AwardsEdit

Adams twice won the annual WTA Player Service Award - in 1996 and 1997.

Post-retirementEdit

Adams has been a television commentator for the Tennis Channel since 2003,[5] a regular contributor to CBS Sports Network all-female sports panel We Need to Talk and is also an executive director of the Harlem Junior Tennis and Education Program.[6]

In January 2015, Adams became President and CEO of the United States Tennis Association, becoming the first former professional tennis player, first African-American and the youngest person to serve as President in the 135-year history of the organisation.[7]

In 2016, Adams became Chairperson of the Fed Cup committee, which governs the Fed Cup.[8]

Adams also serves on the board of directors for the International Tennis Hall of Fame.[9]

WTA Tour finalsEdit

Singles 2 (0–2)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0/0)
WTA Championships (0/0)
Tier I (0/0)
Tier II (0/0)
Tier III (0/0)
Tier IV & V (0/2)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. February 1, 1988 Wellington Hard   Jill Hetherington 6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 2. November 4, 1991 Brentwood Hard (i)   Sabine Appelmans 6–2, 6–4

Doubles 36 (20–16)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0/0)
Olympic Gold (0/0)
WTA Championships (0/0)
Virginia Slims (2/0)
Tier I (1/1)
Tier II (4/5)
Tier III (6/4)
Tier IV & V (7/6)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. December 7, 1987 Guarujá Hard   Cheryl Jones   Jill Hetherington
  Mercedes Paz
6–4, 4–6, 6–4
Winner 2. March 7, 1988 Boca Raton Hard   Zina Garrison   Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
  Helena Suková
4–6, 7–5, 6–4
Runner-up 1. April 11, 1988 Amelia Island Clay   Penny Barg   Zina Garrison
  Eva Pfaff
4–6, 6–2, 7–6(7–5)
Winner 3. April 18, 1988 Houston Clay   Zina Garrison   Lori McNeil
  Martina Navratilova
6–7(4–7), 6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 2. October 24, 1988 Indianapolis Hard (i)   Zina Garrison   Larisa Savchenko
  Natasha Zvereva
6–2, 6–1
Winner 4. November 25, 1988 Tokyo Carpet   Zina Garrison   Gigi Fernández
  Robin White
7–5, 7–5
Winner 5. January 30, 1989 Tokyo Carpet   Zina Garrison   Gigi Fernández
  Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
6–3, 3–6, 7–6(7–5)
Winner 6. February 27, 1989 San Antonio Hard   Pam Shriver   Patty Fendick
  Jill Hetherington
3–6, 6–1, 6–4
Winner 7. April 24, 1989 Houston Clay   Zina Garrison   Gigi Fernández
  Lori McNeil
6–3, 6–4
Winner 8. May 22, 1989 Geneva Clay   Lori McNeil   Larisa Savchenko
  Natalia Zvereva
2–6, 6–3, 6–4
Winner 9. June 19, 1989 Eastbourne Grass   Zina Garrison   Jana Novotná
  Helena Suková
6–3 ret.
Winner 10. October 23, 1989 Brighton Carpet   Lori McNeil   Hana Mandlíková
  Jana Novotná
4–6, 7–6(9–7), 6–4
Winner 11. October 30, 1989 Indianapolis Hard (i)   Lori McNeil   Claudia Porwik
  Larisa Savchenko
6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 3. November 5, 1990 Indianapolis Hard (i)   Jill Hetherington   Patty Fendick
  Meredith McGrath
6–1, 6–1
Runner-up 4. February 18, 1991 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Jill Hetherington   Meredith McGrath
  Anne Smith
6–2, 6–4
Runner-up 5. July 22, 1991 Westchester Hard   Lori McNeil   Rosalyn Fairbank
  Lise Gregory
7–5, 6–4
Winner 12. August 5, 1991 Albuquerque Hard   Isabelle Demongeot   Lise Gregory
  Peanut Louie Harper
6–7(2–7), 6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 6. November 11, 1991 Indianapolis Hard (i)   Mercedes Paz   Patty Fendick
  Gigi Fernández
6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 7. February 10, 1992 Chicago Carpet   Zina Garrison   Martina Navratilova
  Pam Shriver
6–4, 7–6(9–7)
Runner-up 8. February 17, 1992 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Manon Bollegraf   Lori McNeil
  Nicole Provis
3–6, 6–4, 7–6(8–6)
Winner 13. November 9, 1992 Indianapolis Hard (i)   Elna Reinach   Sandy Collins
  Mary-Lou Daniels
5–7, 6–2, 6–4
Winner 14. February 8, 1993 Chicago Carpet   Zina Garrison   Amy Frazier
  Kimberly Po
7–6(9–7), 6–3
Runner-up 9. February 15, 1993 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Manon Bollegraf   Patty Fendick
  Zina Garrison
6–3, 6–2
Winner 15. March 22, 1993 Houston Clay   Manon Bollegraf   Eugenia Maniokova
  Radomira Zrubáková
6–3, 5–7, 7–6(9–7)
Runner-up 10. March 28, 1993 Hilton Head Clay   Manon Bollegraf   Gigi Fernández
  Natalia Zvereva
6–3, 6–1
Winner 16. November 1, 1993 Quebec City Hard (i)   Manon Bollegraf   Katerina Maleeva
  Nathalie Tauziat
6–4, 6–4
Winner 17. November 8, 1993 Philadelphia Carpet   Manon Bollegraf   Conchita Martínez
  Larisa Neiland
6–2, 4–6, 7–6(9–7)
Runner-up 11. February 14, 1994 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Manon Bollegraf   Patty Fendick
  Meredith McGrath
7–6(7–3), 6–2
Runner-up 12. March 21, 1994 Houston Clay   Zina Garrison   Manon Bollegraf
  Martina Navratilova
6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 13. February 13, 1995 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Brenda Schultz   Nicole Arendt
  Laura Golarsa
6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 14. October 30, 1995 Oakland Carpet   Zina Garrison   Lori McNeil
  Helena Suková
3–6, 6–4, 6–3
Runner-up 15. February 19, 1996 Oklahoma City Hard (i)   Debbie Graham   Chanda Rubin
  Brenda Schultz-McCarthy
6–4, 6–3
Winner 18. May 6, 1996 Budapest Clay   Debbie Graham   Radka Bobková
  Eva Melicharová
6–3, 7–6(7–3)
Winner 19. May 13, 1996 Cardiff Clay   Mariaan de Swardt   Els Callens
  Laurence Courtois
6–0, 6–4
Winner 20. June 9, 1997 Birmingham Grass   Larisa Neiland   Nathalie Tauziat
  Linda Wild
6–2, 6–3
Runner-up 16. January 12, 1998 Sydney Hard   Meredith McGrath   Martina Hingis
  Helena Suková
6–1, 6–2

Singles performance timelineEdit

Tournament 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 1R 2R 1R A 3R LQ LQ LQ A 1R 4–8
French Open A 1R 1R LQ LQ 1R LQ LQ A 1R LQ 4–9
Wimbledon A 4R 3R 1R LQ 2R LQ 1R 1R 2R LQ 18–10
US Open LQ 1R 1R 1R LQ A 1R 1R 3R 1R LQ 7–10

Women's doubles performance timelineEdit

Tournament 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A 3R 3R 3R A QF 3R 2R 1R A 2R 1R 1R 13–10
French Open A A QF QF 3R 3R QF QF 1R QF QF 2R 3R 1R 25–12
Wimbledon A A SF QF 3R QF 3R 1R 2R 3R QF 3R 3R 1R 23–12
US Open 1R 1R 2R 3R 3R QF A 3R QF 3R 2R 3R 2R 1R 19–13

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Girls Tennis Top Finishers". Illinois High School Association. Retrieved 2008-07-28.
  2. ^ "ITA Hall of Fame - Katrina Adams". ITA Hall of Fame. ITA. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
  3. ^ "Tennis: A Great Match for Katrina Adams". Northwestern Magazine. Northwestern University. Winter 2004. Retrieved 2008-07-28.
  4. ^ Katrina Adams at the International Tennis Federation Retrieved 2008-07-28
  5. ^ "Katrina Adams". Programs. Tennis Channel. Archived from the original on 2008-07-20. Retrieved 2008-07-28.
  6. ^ "News You Can Use". Pro Tennis. United States Tennis Association. 2006-10-25. Retrieved 2008-07-28.
  7. ^ "USTA CHAIRMAN, CEO AND PRESIDENT KATRINA M. ADAMS". USTA. 1 Jan 2017.
  8. ^ "FED CUP COMMITTEE". Fed Cup. Retrieved 26 Jan 2018.
  9. ^ "Leadership". International Tennis Hall of Fame. Retrieved 26 Jan 2018.

External linksEdit