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The Miami Open, sometimes known as the Miami Masters and part of the Sunshine Double, is an annual tennis tournament for men and women now held at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.[1] Before 2019, the tournament was held on hard courts at the Tennis Center at Crandon Park in Key Biscayne, Florida. The tournament, held annually in late March, is a Masters 1000 event on the men's tour and a Premier Mandatory event on the women's tour.

Miami Open
Tournament information
Founded1985; 34 years ago (1985)
LocationMiami Gardens, Florida
USA
VenueHard Rock Stadium (beginning in 2019)
Key Biscayne (1987-2018)
SurfaceHard (Laykold) - outdoors
Websitemiamiopen.com
Current champions (2019)
Men's singlesSwitzerland Roger Federer
Women's singlesAustralia Ashleigh Barty
Men's doublesUnited States Bob Bryan
United States Mike Bryan
Women's doublesBelgium Elise Mertens
Belarus Aryna Sabalenka
ATP World Tour
CategoryMasters 1000
Draw96S / 48Q / 32D
Prize moneyUS$9,035,428 (2019)
WTA Tour
CategoryPremier Mandatory
Draw96S / 48Q / 32D
Prize moneyUS$9,035,428 (2019)

Over $500 million was spent in additions and renovations to transform the Hard Rock Stadium to accommodate the event.[2] Organizers believe that the new infrastructure will enhance visitor experience with additional food and entertainment options.[3] The new tennis features 29 permanent tournament and practice courts, a larger parking area, and additional infrastructure like food and entertainment facilities.[4]

The tournament has had multiple sponsorships in its history. During its inaugural playing in 1985, the tournament was known as the Lipton International Players Championships and it was a premier event of the Grand Prix Tennis Tour as part of the Grand Prix Super Series from that first year until 1990. In 2000, the event was renamed the Ericsson Open and in 2002, the event became known as the NASDAQ-100 Open. In 2007, the tournament was renamed the Sony Ericsson Open, in a deal by which Sony Ericsson paid $20 million total over four years ending in 2014. From 2015 to 2019, the international bank Itaú was the presenting sponsor, making the official name of the tournament the Miami Open presented by Itaú.[5]

In 2010, a record 300,000 visitors attended matches at the 12-day Sony Ericsson Open, making it one of the largest tennis tournaments outside the four Grand Slams.[6] In 2011, 316,267 visitors attended the Open.[7]

The courts at the Tennis Center at Crandon Park had been criticized as the slowest hardcourt on the tour, subjecting players to endless grinding rallies in extreme heat and humidity.[8][9]

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
Stadium Court, the main venue at the Miami Open at night time
 
A 2009 match between Rafael Nadal and Juan Martín del Potro at Stadium Court

The initial idea of holding an international tennis tournament in Miami was born in the 1960s, when famous tennis players such as Pancho Gonzalez, Jack Kramer, Pancho Segura, Frank Sedgman, and Butch Buchholz toured across the country in a station wagon, playing tennis in fairgrounds with portable canvas court.[10] The tournament officially was founded by former player Butch Buchholz who was executive director of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) in the 1980s. His original aim was to make the event the first major tournament of the year (the Australian Open was held in December at that time), and he dubbed it the "Winter Wimbledon". Buchholz approached the ATP and the WTA, offering to provide the prize-money and to give them a percentage of the ticket sales and worldwide television rights in return for the right to run the tournament for 15 years. The two associations agreed.

The first tournament was held in February 1985 at Laver's International Tennis Resort in Delray Beach, Florida. Buchholz brought in Alan Mills, the tournament referee at Wimbledon, as the head referee, and Ted Tinling, a well-known tennis fashion designer since the 1920s, as the director of protocol. At the time, the prize money of US$1.8 million was surpassed only by Wimbledon and the US Open. The event's prize money has since grown to over $13 million.

In 1986, the tournament relocated to Boca West. After its successful second year there, Merrett Stierheim, Dade County manager and Women's Tennis Association (WTA) president, helped Buchholz in 1987 move the tournament to its long-term home in Key Biscayne for 1988.[11] In keeping with ambitions of its founder, the tournament has been maintained as one of the premier events in pro tennis after the Grand Slams and the ATP World Tour Finals sometimes referred to as the "Fifth Major" up until the mid-2000s.[12] In 1999, Buchholz sold the tournament to IMG.[13] In 2004, the Indian Wells Masters also expanded to a multi-week 96 player field, and since then, the two March extravaganzas have been colloquially termed the 'Sunshine Double'.[14][15]

The land on which the Crandon Park facility stands had been donated to Miami-Dade County by the Matheson family in 1992 under a stipulation that only one stadium could be built on it. The tournament organizers proposed a $50 million upgrade of Crandon Park that would have added several permanent stadiums, and the family responded with a lawsuit.[16] In 2015, an appeals court ruled in the family's favor, preventing upgrades from being made to the aging complex. The organizers decided not to pursue further legal action and started looking for a new site. In November of 2017, the Miami Open signed an agreement with Miami-Dade County to move the annual tournament from the tennis complex in Key Biscayne to the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida beginning in 2019.[17][18]

Event characteristicsEdit

Beside the four Major championships, the Miami Open is one of a small number of events on the ATP and WTA tours where the main singles draw (for both the men and the women) involves more than 64 players, and where main draw play extends beyond one week. 96 men and 96 women compete in the singles competition, and 32 teams compete in each of the doubles competitions with the event lasting 12 days. Tennis Channel and ESPN televises early-round coverage in the U.S., and ESPN broadcasts the final.

In 2006, the tournament became the first event in the United States to use Hawk-Eye to allow players to challenge close line calls. Players were allowed three challenges per set, with an additional challenge allowed for tiebreaks. The first challenge was made by Jamea Jackson against Ashley Harkleroad in the first round.

From 1985 until 1990 and again from 1997 to 2007, the men's final was held as a best-of-five set match, similar to the Grand Slam events. After 2007 the ATP required that the handful of ATP World Tour Masters 1000 events which had best-of-five finals switch to the usual ATP best-of-three match format because several times the participants in long finals matches ended up withdrawing from tennis tournaments they were scheduled to participate in which were commencing in only two or three days. The last best-of-five set final was won by Novak Djokovic in 2007.

Points and prize moneyEdit

As an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 event, the tournament is worth up to 1000 ATP Rankings points to the singles and doubles champions. This is a table detailing the points and prize money allocation for each round of the 2016 Miami ATP Masters 1000 and WTA Premier Mandatory event:

Point distributionEdit

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q Q2 Q1
Men's Singles 1000 600 360 180 90 45 25* 10 16 8 0
Men's Doubles 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Singles 650 390 215 120 65 35* 10 30 20 2
Women's Doubles 10 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
  • Players with byes receive first round points.

Prize moneyEdit

Event W F SF QF Round of 16 Round of 32 Round of 64 Round of 128 Q2 Q1
Men's Singles $1,028,300 $501,815 $251,500 $128,215 $67,590 $36,170 $19,530 $11,970 $3,565 $1,825
Women's Singles[19][20]
Men's Doubles $336,920 $164,420 $82,410 $42,000 $22,140 $11,860 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Women's Doubles[21] N/A N/A N/A N/A

Past resultsEdit

Men's singlesEdit

  • The men's final has been abandoned three times since the tournament's inception.
    • In 1989, Thomas Muster was hit by a drunk driver just hours after his semifinal victory, severing left knee ligaments, which put him in a wheelchair for months. He won the championship eight years later.
    • In 1996, Goran Ivanišević retired from the final early with a stiff neck, after sleeping awkwardly the night before.
    • In 2004, Guillermo Coria was visibly bothered by back pain from late in the first set of the final. Coria eventually retired during the first game of the fourth set due to this back pain. The problem turned out to be kidney stones.
Year Champion Runner-up Score Name
1985   Tim Mayotte   Scott Davis 4–6, 4–6, 6–3, 6–2, 6–4
Lipton International Players Championship
1986   Ivan Lendl   Mats Wilander 3–6, 6–1, 7–6(7–5), 6–4
1987   Miloslav Mečíř   Ivan Lendl 7–5, 6–2, 7–5
1988   Mats Wilander   Jimmy Connors 6–4, 4–6, 6–4, 6–4
1989   Ivan Lendl (2)   Thomas Muster Walkover
1990   Andre Agassi   Stefan Edberg 6–1, 6–4, 0–6, 6–2
1991   Jim Courier   David Wheaton 4–6, 6–3, 6–4
1992   Michael Chang   Alberto Mancini 7–5, 7–5
1993   Pete Sampras   MaliVai Washington 6–3, 6–2
Lipton Championship
1994   Pete Sampras (2)   Andre Agassi 5–7, 6–3, 6–3
1995   Andre Agassi (2)   Pete Sampras 3–6, 6–2, 7–6(7–3)
1996   Andre Agassi (3)   Goran Ivanišević 3–0 Ret.
1997   Thomas Muster   Sergi Bruguera 7–6(8–6), 6–3, 6–1
1998   Marcelo Ríos   Andre Agassi 7–5, 6–3, 6–4
1999   Richard Krajicek   Sébastien Grosjean 4–6, 6–1, 6–2, 7–5
2000   Pete Sampras (3)   Gustavo Kuerten 6–1, 6–7(2–7), 7–6(7–5), 7–6(10–8)
Ericsson Open
2001   Andre Agassi (4)   Jan-Michael Gambill 7–6(7–4), 6–1, 6–0
2002   Andre Agassi (5)   Roger Federer 6–3, 6–3, 3–6, 6–4
NASDAQ-100 Open
2003   Andre Agassi (6)   Carlos Moyá 6–3, 6–3
2004   Andy Roddick   Guillermo Coria 6–7(2–7), 6–3, 6–1, Ret.
2005   Roger Federer   Rafael Nadal 2–6, 6–7(4–7), 7–6(7–5), 6–3, 6–1
2006   Roger Federer (2)   Ivan Ljubičić 7–6(7–5), 7–6(7–4), 7–6(8–6)
2007   Novak Djokovic   Guillermo Cañas 6–3, 6–2, 6–4
Sony Ericsson Open
2008   Nikolay Davydenko   Rafael Nadal 6–4, 6–2
2009   Andy Murray   Novak Djokovic 6–2, 7–5
2010   Andy Roddick (2)   Tomáš Berdych 7–5, 6–4
2011   Novak Djokovic (2)   Rafael Nadal 4–6, 6–3, 7–6(7–4)
2012   Novak Djokovic (3)   Andy Murray 6–1, 7–6(7–4)
2013   Andy Murray (2)   David Ferrer 2–6, 6–4, 7–6(7–1)
Sony Open Tennis
2014   Novak Djokovic (4)   Rafael Nadal 6–3, 6–3
2015   Novak Djokovic (5)   Andy Murray 7–6(7–3), 4–6, 6–0
Miami Open presented by Itaú
2016   Novak Djokovic (6)   Kei Nishikori 6–3, 6–3
2017   Roger Federer (3)   Rafael Nadal 6–3, 6–4
2018   John Isner   Alexander Zverev 6–7(4–7), 6–4, 6–4
2019   Roger Federer (4)   John Isner 6–1, 6–4

Women's singlesEdit

Year Champion Runner-up Score
Lipton International Players Championships
1985   Martina Navratilova   Chris Evert 6–2, 6–4
1986   Chris Evert   Steffi Graf 6–4, 6–2
1987   Steffi Graf   Chris Evert 6–1, 6–2
↓  Tier I tournament  ↓
1988   Steffi Graf (2)   Chris Evert 6–4, 6–4
1989   Gabriela Sabatini   Chris Evert 6–1, 4–6, 6–2
1990   Monica Seles   Judith Wiesner 6–1, 6–2
1991   Monica Seles (2)   Gabriela Sabatini 6–3, 7–5
1992   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario   Gabriela Sabatini 6–1, 6–4
Lipton Championships
1993   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (2)   Steffi Graf 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
1994   Steffi Graf (3)   Natasha Zvereva 4–6, 6–1, 6–2
1995   Steffi Graf (4)   Kimiko Date 6–1, 6–4
1996   Steffi Graf (5)   Chanda Rubin 6–1, 6–3
1997   Martina Hingis   Monica Seles 6–2, 6–1
1998   Venus Williams   Anna Kournikova 2–6, 6–4, 6–1
1999   Venus Williams (2)   Serena Williams 6–1, 4–6, 6–4
Ericsson Open
2000   Martina Hingis (2)   Lindsay Davenport 6–3, 6–2
2001   Venus Williams (3)   Jennifer Capriati 4–6, 6–1, 7–6(7–4)
NASDAQ-100 Open
2002   Serena Williams   Jennifer Capriati 7–5, 7–6(7–4)
2003   Serena Williams (2)   Jennifer Capriati 4–6, 6–4, 6–1
2004   Serena Williams (3)   Elena Dementieva 6–1, 6–1
2005   Kim Clijsters   Maria Sharapova 6–3, 7–5
2006   Svetlana Kuznetsova   Maria Sharapova 6–4, 6–3
Sony Ericsson Open
2007   Serena Williams (4)   Justine Henin 0–6, 7–5, 6–3
2008   Serena Williams (5)   Jelena Janković 6–1, 5–7, 6–3
↓  Premier Mandatory tournament  ↓
2009   Victoria Azarenka   Serena Williams 6–3, 6–1
2010   Kim Clijsters (2)   Venus Williams 6–2, 6–1
2011   Victoria Azarenka (2)   Maria Sharapova 6–1, 6–4
2012   Agnieszka Radwańska   Maria Sharapova 7–5, 6–4
Sony Open Tennis
2013   Serena Williams (6)   Maria Sharapova 4–6, 6–3, 6–0
2014   Serena Williams (7)   Li Na 7–5, 6–1
Miami Open presented by Itaú
2015   Serena Williams (8)   Carla Suárez Navarro 6–2, 6–0
2016   Victoria Azarenka (3)   Svetlana Kuznetsova 6–3, 6–2
2017   Johanna Konta   Caroline Wozniacki 6–4, 6–3
2018   Sloane Stephens   Jeļena Ostapenko 7–6(7–5), 6–1
2019   Ashleigh Barty   Karolína Plíšková 7–6(7–1), 6–3

Men's doublesEdit

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1985   Paul Annacone
  Christo van Rensburg
  Sherwood Stewart
  Kim Warwick
7–5, 7–5, 6–4
1986   Brad Gilbert
  Vince Van Patten
  Stefan Edberg
  Anders Järryd
Walkover
1987   Paul Annacone (2)
  Christo van Rensburg (2)
  Ken Flach
  Robert Seguso
6–2, 6–4, 6–4
1988   John Fitzgerald
  Anders Järryd
  Ken Flach
  Robert Seguso
7–6, 6–1, 7–5
1989   Jakob Hlasek
  Anders Järryd (2)
  Jim Grabb
  Patrick McEnroe
6–3, Ret.
1990   Rick Leach
  Jim Pugh
  Boris Becker
  Cássio Motta
6–3, 6–4
1991   Wayne Ferreira
  Piet Norval
  Ken Flach
  Robert Seguso
5–7, 7–6, 6–2
1992   Ken Flach
  Todd Witsken
  Kent Kinnear
  Sven Salumaa
6–4, 6–3
1993   Richard Krajicek
  Jan Siemerink
  Patrick McEnroe
  Jonathan Stark
6–7, 6–4, 7–6
1994   Jacco Eltingh
  Paul Haarhuis
  Mark Knowles
  Jared Palmer
7–6, 7–6
1995   Todd Woodbridge
  Mark Woodforde
  Jim Grabb
  Patrick McEnroe
6–3, 7–6
1996   Todd Woodbridge (2)
  Mark Woodforde (2)
  Ellis Ferreira
  Patrick Galbraith
6–1, 6–3
1997   Todd Woodbridge (3)
  Mark Woodforde (3)
  Mark Knowles
  Daniel Nestor
7–6, 7–6
1998   Ellis Ferreira
  Rick Leach (2)
  Alex O'Brien
  Jonathan Stark
6–2, 6–4
1999   Wayne Black
  Sandon Stolle
  Boris Becker
  Jan-Michael Gambill
6–1, 6–1
2000   Todd Woodbridge (4)
  Mark Woodforde (4)
  Martin Damm
  Dominik Hrbatý
6–3, 6–4
2001   Jiří Novák
  David Rikl
  Jonas Björkman
  Todd Woodbridge
7–5, 7–6(7–3)
2002   Mark Knowles
  Daniel Nestor
  Donald Johnson
  Jared Palmer
6–3, 3–6, 6–1
2003   Roger Federer
  Max Mirnyi
  Leander Paes
  David Rikl
7–5, 6–3
2004   Wayne Black (2)
  Kevin Ullyett
  Jonas Björkman
  Todd Woodbridge
6–2, 7–6(14–12)
2005   Jonas Björkman
  Max Mirnyi (2)
  Wayne Black
  Kevin Ullyett
6–1, 6–2
2006   Jonas Björkman (2)
  Max Mirnyi (3)
  Bob Bryan
  Mike Bryan
6–4, 6–4
2007   Bob Bryan
  Mike Bryan
  Martin Damm
  Leander Paes
6–7(7–9), 6–3, [10–7]
2008   Bob Bryan (2)
  Mike Bryan (2)
  Mahesh Bhupathi
  Mark Knowles
6–2, 6–2
2009   Max Mirnyi (4)
  Andy Ram
  Ashley Fisher
  Stephen Huss
6–7(4–7), 6–2, [10–7]
2010   Lukáš Dlouhý
  Leander Paes
  Mahesh Bhupathi
  Max Mirnyi
6–2, 7–5
2011   Mahesh Bhupathi
  Leander Paes (2)
  Max Mirnyi
  Daniel Nestor
6–7(5–7), 6–2, [10–5]
2012   Leander Paes (3)
  Radek Štěpánek
  Max Mirnyi
  Daniel Nestor
3–6, 6–1, [10–8]
2013   Aisam-ul-Haq Qureshi
  Jean-Julien Rojer
  Mariusz Fyrstenberg
  Marcin Matkowski
6–4, 6–1
2014   Bob Bryan (3)
  Mike Bryan (3)
  Juan Sebastián Cabal
  Robert Farah Maksoud
7–6(10–8), 6–4
2015   Bob Bryan (4)
  Mike Bryan (4)
  Vasek Pospisil
  Jack Sock
6–3, 1–6, [10–8]
2016   Pierre-Hugues Herbert
  Nicolas Mahut
  Raven Klaasen
  Rajeev Ram
5–7, 6–1, [10–7]
2017   Łukasz Kubot
  Marcelo Melo
  Nicholas Monroe
  Jack Sock
7–5, 6–3
2018   Bob Bryan (5)
  Mike Bryan (5)
  Karen Khachanov
  Andrey Rublev
4–6, 7–6(7–5), [10–4]
2019   Bob Bryan (6)
  Mike Bryan (6)
  Wesley Koolhof
  Stefanos Tsitsipas
7–5, 7–6(10–8)

Women's doublesEdit

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1985   Gigi Fernández
  Martina Navratilova
  Barbara Jordan
  Hana Mandlíková
7–6(7–4), 6–2
1986   Pam Shriver
  Helena Suková
  Chris Evert
  Wendy Turnbull
6–2, 6–3
1987   Martina Navratilova (2)
  Pam Shriver (2)
  Claudia Kohde-Kilsch
  Helena Suková
6–3, 7–6(8–6)
1988   Steffi Graf
  Gabriela Sabatini
  Gigi Fernández
  Zina Garrison
7–6(8–6), 6–3
1989   Jana Novotná
  Helena Suková (2)
  Gigi Fernández
  Lori McNeil
7–6(7–5), 6–4
1990   Jana Novotná (2)
  Helena Suková (3)
  Betsy Nagelsen
  Robin White
6–4, 6–3
1991   Mary Joe Fernández
  Zina Garrison
  Gigi Fernández
  Jana Novotná
7–5, 6–2
1992   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario
  Larisa Savchenko Neiland
  Jill Hetherington
  Kathy Rinaldi
7–5, 5–7, 6–3
1993   Jana Novotná (3)
  Larisa Savchenko Neiland (2)
  Jill Hetherington
  Kathy Rinaldi
6–2, 7–5
1994   Gigi Fernández (2)
  Natasha Zvereva
  Patty Fendick
  Meredith McGrath
6–3, 6–1
1995   Jana Novotná (4)
  Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (2)
  Gigi Fernández
  Natasha Zvereva
7–5, 2–6, 6–3
1996   Jana Novotná (5)
  Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (3)
  Meredith McGrath
  Larisa Savchenko Neiland
6–4, 6–4
1997   Arantxa Sánchez Vicario (4)
  Natasha Zvereva (2)
  Sabine Appelmans
  Miriam Oremans
6–4, 6–2
1998   Martina Hingis
  Jana Novotná (6)
  Arantxa Sánchez
  Natasha Zvereva
6–2, 3–6, 6–3
1999   Martina Hingis (2)
  Jana Novotná (7)
  Mary Joe Fernández
  Monica Seles
0–6, 6–4, 7–6(7–1)
2000   Julie Halard-Decugis
  Ai Sugiyama
  Nicole Arendt
  Manon Bollegraf
4–6, 7–5, 6–4
2001   Arantxa Sánchez-Vicario (5)
  Nathalie Tauziat
  Lisa Raymond
  Rennae Stubbs
6–0, 6–4
2002   Lisa Raymond
  Rennae Stubbs
  Virginia Ruano Pascual
  Paola Suárez
7–6(7–4), 6–7(4–7), 6–3
2003   Liezel Huber
  Magdalena Maleeva
  Shinobu Asagoe
  Nana Miyagi
6–4, 3–6, 7–5
2004   Nadia Petrova
  Meghann Shaughnessy
  Svetlana Kuznetsova
  Elena Likhovtseva
6–2, 6–3
2005   Svetlana Kuznetsova
  Alicia Molik
  Lisa Raymond
  Rennae Stubbs
7–5, 6–7(5–7), 6–2
2006   Lisa Raymond (2)
  Samantha Stosur
  Liezel Huber
  Martina Navratilova
6–4, 7–5
2007   Lisa Raymond (3)
  Samantha Stosur (2)
  Cara Black
  Liezel Huber
6–4, 3–6, [10–2]
2008   Katarina Srebotnik
  Ai Sugiyama (2)
  Cara Black
  Liezel Huber
7–5, 4–6, [10–3]
2009   Svetlana Kuznetsova (2)
  Amélie Mauresmo
  Květa Peschke
  Lisa Raymond
4–6, 6–3, [10–3]
2010   Gisela Dulko
  Flavia Pennetta
  Nadia Petrova
  Samantha Stosur
6–3, 4–6, [10–7]
2011   Daniela Hantuchová
  Agnieszka Radwańska
  Liezel Huber
  Nadia Petrova
7–6(7–5), 2–6, [10–8]
2012   Maria Kirilenko
  Nadia Petrova (2)
  Sara Errani
  Roberta Vinci
7–6(7–0), 4–6, [10–4]
2013   Nadia Petrova (3)
  Katarina Srebotnik (2)
  Lisa Raymond
  Laura Robson
6–1, 7–6(7–2)
2014   Martina Hingis (3)
  Sabine Lisicki
  Ekaterina Makarova
  Elena Vesnina
4–6, 6–4, [10–5]
2015   Martina Hingis (4)
  Sania Mirza
  Ekaterina Makarova
  Elena Vesnina
7–5, 6–1
2016   Bethanie Mattek-Sands
  Lucie Šafářová
  Tímea Babos
  Yaroslava Shvedova
6–3, 6–4
2017   Gabriela Dabrowski
  Xu Yifan
  Sania Mirza
  Barbora Strýcová
6–4, 6–3
2018   Ashleigh Barty
  CoCo Vandeweghe
  Barbora Krejčíková
  Kateřina Siniaková
6–2, 6–1
2019   Elise Mertens
  Aryna Sabalenka
  Samantha Stosur
  Zhang Shuai
7–6 (7–5), 6–2

Mixed doublesEdit

Year Champion Runner-up Score
1985   Heinz Günthardt
  Martina Navratilova
  Wojciech Fibak
  Carling Bassett
6–3, 6–4
1986   John Fitzgerald
  Elizabeth Smylie
  Emilio Sánchez
  Steffi Graf
6–4, 7–5
1987   Miloslav Mečíř
  Jana Novotná
  Christo van Rensburg
  Elna Reinach
6–3, 3–6, 6–3
1988   Michiel Schapers
  Ann Henricksson
  Jim Pugh
  Jana Novotná
6–4, 6–4
1989   Ken Flach
  Jill Hetherington
  Sherwood Stewart
  Zina Garrison
6–2, 7–6(7–3)

RecordsEdit

Player Record Year
Most Singles Titles
Men's Singles   Andre Agassi (USA)
  Novak Djokovic (SRB)
6
1990, 1995, 1996, 2001, 2002, 2003
2007, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016
Women's Singles   Serena Williams (USA)
8
2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2013, 2014, 2015
Most Consecutive Titles
Men's Singles   Andre Agassi (USA)
  Novak Djokovic (SRB)
3
2001, 2002, 2003
2014, 2015, 2016
Women's Singles   Steffi Graf (GER)
  Serena Williams (USA)
3
1994, 1995, 1996
2002, 2003, 2004 & 2013, 2014, 2015
Most Consecutive Matches Won
Men's Singles   Andre Agassi (USA)
19
2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
Women's Singles   Steffi Graf (GER)
  Venus Williams (USA)
22
1994, 1995, 1996, 1999
1998, 1999, 2001, 2002
Most Times Seeded No. 1 at the Tournament
Men's Singles   Roger Federer (SUI)
7
2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2018
Women's Singles   Serena Williams (USA)
7
2003, 2004, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Unseeded Players Who Advanced to the Finals
Men's Singles   Sébastien Grosjean (FRA)
  David Wheaton (USA)
  Tim Mayotte (USA) (winner)
  Scott Davis (USA)
1999
1991
1985
1985
Women's Singles   Kim Clijsters (BEL) (winner)
2005
Youngest & Oldest Winners
Youngest Men's Singles   Novak Djokovic (SRB)
19 years,
316 days old
2007
Youngest Women's Singles   Monica Seles (YUG)
16 years,
111 days old
1990
Oldest Men's Singles   Roger Federer (SUI)
37 years,
235 days old
2019
Oldest Women's Singles   Serena Williams (USA)
33 years,
190 days old
2015
Most Finals Reached
Men's Singles   Andre Agassi (USA)
8
1990, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003
Women's Singles   Serena Williams (USA)
10
1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2015
Most Doubles Titles – Teams
Men's Doubles   Bryan (USA) /   Bryan (USA)
6
2007, 2008, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019
Women's Doubles   Novotná (CZE) /   Suková (CZE)
  Novotná (CZE) /   Sánchez (ESP)
  Novotná (CZE) /   Hingis (SUI)
  Raymond (USA) /   Stosur (AUS)
2
1989, 1990
1995, 1996
1998, 1999
2006, 2007
Most Doubles Titles – Individual
Men's Doubles   Bob Bryan (USA)
  Mike Bryan (USA)
6
2007, 2008, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019
Women's Doubles   Jana Novotná (CZE)
7
1989, 1990, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999

Sunshine DoubleEdit

 
In 2005 Belgian Kim Clijsters became the first unseeded woman to win Miami Open and, after Steffi Graf, the second who completed Sunshine Double
Players who have completed the Sunshine Double
Indian Wells Masters and Miami Masters in the same year[22]
# Player Title(s) Year(s)
1   Jim Courier (USA) 1 1991
2   Michael Chang (USA) 1 1992
3   Pete Sampras (USA) 1 1994
4   Steffi Graf (GER) 2 1994, 1996
5   Marcelo Ríos (CHI) 1 1998
6   Andre Agassi (USA) 1 2001
7     Roger Federer (SUI) 3 2005, 2006, 2017
8   Kim Clijsters (BEL) 1 2005
9   Novak Djokovic (SRB) 4 2011, 2014, 2015, 2016
10   Victoria Azarenka (BLR) 1 2016

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Renderings unveiled for Miami Open in Hard Rock Stadium". Miami Herald. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  2. ^ http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/miami-dolphins/fl-sp-dolphins-hard-rock-20170808-story.html
  3. ^ "How The Miami Open Is Repositioning Itself At Hard Rock Stadium And Increasing Ticket Sales". Forbes. Jan 7, 2019. Retrieved Feb 27, 2019.
  4. ^ "Miami Open".
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 11, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Open Carrying Slam Appeal". Retrieved April 3, 2010.[dead link]
  7. ^ "Sony Ericsson a hit with Fans". Retrieved April 6, 2011.[dead link]
  8. ^ Rusedski, Greg. "Miami courts too slow". blogs.reuters.com. Reuters.
  9. ^ Nemeroff, Nick. "On Purple Clay: Miami and the Homogenization of Tennis". thetennisisland.com. The MH Magazine Theme.
  10. ^ "Tournament History".
  11. ^ "Sony Ericsson Open". Prolebrity. Archived from the original on 16 March 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2011.
  12. ^ "Murray wins Miami Masters title". BBC Online. 2009-05-04.
  13. ^ Buchholz Is Selling, But Not Giving Up, Tournament He Founded
  14. ^ Sias, Van (23 March 2019). "The Stat Sheet: Broken stranglehold on 'Sunshine Double'". Baseline. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  15. ^ Braden, Jonathon (21 March 2017). "Roger Federer Will Go For His Third Sunshine Double At The Miami Open | ATP Tour | Tennis". ATP Tour. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  16. ^ Bembry, Jerry (20 March 2019). "Picassos, DJs, and a new stadium: Inside the new Miami Open". ESPN.com. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  17. ^ "See First Glimpses of the Miami Open at Hard Rock Stadium".
  18. ^ Brenner, Steve (30 March 2018). "Why is the Miami Open moving to a 65,000-capacity NFL stadium?". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  19. ^ http://www.wtatennis.com/SEWTATour-Archive/posting/2016/837/MDS.pdf[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ http://www.wtatennis.com/SEWTATour-Archive/posting/2016/837/QS.pdf[permanent dead link]
  21. ^ http://www.wtatennis.com/SEWTATour-Archive/posting/2016/837/MDD.pdf[permanent dead link]
  22. ^ Neelabhra Roy (2017-03-28). "10 tennis players who have completed the Sunshine Double". Sports Keeda. Retrieved 2018-04-03.

External linksEdit