In Indonesia, village or subdistrict is the fourth-level subdivision and the smallest administrative division of Indonesia below a district, regency/city, and province. Similar administrative divisions outside of Indonesia include barangays in the Philippines, Muban in Thailand, civil townships and incorporated municipalities in the United States and Canada, communes in France and Vietnam, dehestan in Iran, hromada in Ukraine, Gemeinden in Germany, comuni in Italy, or municipios in Spain. The UK equivalent are civil parishes in England and communities in Wales. There are a number of names and types for villages in Indonesia, with desa (rural village) being the most frequently used for regencies, and kelurahan (urban village) for cities or for those communities within regencies which have town characteristics. According to the 2019 report by the Ministry of Home Affairs, there are 8,488 urban villages and 74,953 rural villages in Indonesia.[1] North Aceh Regency contained the highest number of rural villages (852) amongst all of the regencies of Indonesia, followed by Pidie Regency with 730 rural villages and Bireuen Regency with 609 rural villages. Prabumulih, with only 12 rural villages, contained the fewest. Counted together, the sixteen regencies of Indonesia containing the most rural villages—namely, North Aceh (852), Pidie (730), Bireuen (609), Aceh Besar (604), Tolikara (541), East Aceh (513), Yahukimo (510), Purworejo (469), Lamongan (462), South Nias (459), Kebumen (449), Garut (421), Bojonegoro (419), Bogor (416), Cirebon (412), and Pati (401)—contain one-third of all the rural villages in Indonesia. Five of these are located in Aceh, two in Highland Papua, three in Central Java, two in East Java, three in West Java, and one in North Sumatra. An average number of rural villages in the regencies and 15 cities of Indonesia is 172 villages. A village is the lowest administrative division in Indonesia, and it is the lowest of the four levels. A village is usually divided into a number of hamlets, and there are 252,315 hamlets in Indonesia.

Number of rural villages in districts of Indonesia is usually varying from 40 to 50 villages. However, there are 9 districts in Indonesia with more than 60 rural villages or its variation, including:

  • Abenaho (107 kampungs)
  • Dolok (85 rural villages)
  • Padang Bolak (77 rural villages)
  • Lhoksukon (75 gampongs)
  • Peusangan (69 gampongs)
  • Krayan (65 rural villages)
  • Padang Tiji, Pidie (each with 64 gampongs respectively)
  • Welarek (61 kampungs)

The total number of villages in these 9 districts is 667, about 0.9% percent of 74,953 rural villages in Indonesia.

Types of villages edit

Kelurahan edit

 
The kelurahan office of Gelora, Central Jakarta, Jakarta

Kelurahan is an urban village term primarily used in cities, but also tiny parts of regencies. All provinces with the exception of Aceh have kelurahan.[2][3] It is commonly translated to English as subdistrict. The leader of a kelurahan is called lurah. Major cities in Indonesia such as Jakarta, Surabaya and Medan are entirely urbanised and thus no rural villages. However, in the case of the province of Aceh, there is exactly no kelurahan and all five cities in the province are entirely rural. A lurah is a civil servant appointed by the district head. According to the Regulation of the Minister of Home Affairs Number 31 of 2006, a kelurahan can be created with the following criteria:

A kelurahan must have a government office, an established transportation network, adequate communication facilities, and public facilities. If it no longer meets the above conditions it can be abolished or combined with other kelurahans based on the results of research and studies conducted by the city/regency government.[4]

Desa edit

 
The desa office of Boludawa, Bone Bolango Regency, Gorontalo

Desa is a rural village terminology used in the majority of regencies in Indonesia, but also in tiny parts of cities.[3] However, several provinces have adopted their own terminology for their traditional villages (desa adat). The leader of a desa does not have a civil servant status and is chosen by the public through an election. According to the Law Number 6 of 2014, desa and desa adat are legal community units that have territorial boundaries that are authorized to regulate and administer government affairs, community interests based on community initiatives, original rights, and/or traditional rights recognized and respected in the government system of the Republic of Indonesia.[5]

Variations of desa terminology in Indonesia include:

Number of villages edit

Provinces Number of villages as of 2019[1] 2023 [11]
Kelurahan Desa Total total
Aceh 0 6,497 6,497 6,500
North Sumatra 693 5,417 6,110 6,110
West Sumatra 230 928 1,158 1,165
Riau 268 1,591 1,859 1,862
Jambi 163 1,399 1,562 1,585
South Sumatra 387 2,853 3,240 3,258
Bengkulu 172 1,341 1,513 1,513
Lampung 205 2,435 2,640 2,651
Bangka Belitung Islands 82 309 391 393
Riau Islands 142 275 417 419
Special Region of Jakarta 267 0 267 267
West Java 645 5,312 5,957 5,957
Central Java 753 7,809 8,562 8,563
Special Region of Yogyakarta 46 392 438 438
East Java 777 7,724 8,501 8,494
Banten 313 1,238 1,551 1,552
Bali 80 636 716 716
West Nusa Tenggara 142 1,005 1,147 1,166
East Nusa Tenggara 327 3,026 3,353 3,442
West Kalimantan 99 2,031 2,130 2,145
Central Kalimantan 139 1,432 1,571 1,571
South Kalimantan 144 1,864 2,008 2,016
East Kalimantan 197 841 1,038 1,038
North Kalimantan 35 447 482 482
North Sulawesi 332 1,507 1,839 1,839
Central Sulawesi 175 1,842 2,017 2,017
South Sulawesi 792 2,255 3,047 3,059
Southeast Sulawesi 377 1,911 2,288 2,287
Gorontalo 72 657 729 729
West Sulawesi 73 575 648 648
Maluku 35 1,198 1,233 1,235
North Maluku 118 1,063 1,181 1,185
West Papua 95 1,742 1,837 824
Southwest Papua 1,013
Papua 110 5,411 5,521 999
Central Papua 1,208
Highland Papua 2,627
South Papua 690
Total 8,488 74,953 83,441 83,763

See also edit

Notes edit

  • ^[a] In other places, "dusun" is an administrative division form below "desa".
  • ^[b] In other places, "kampung" is equal with "dusun", except in Bungo, Jambi.

References edit

  1. ^ a b "Peraturan Menteri Dalam Negeri Nomor 72 Tahun 2019 tentang Perubahan atas Permendagri nomor 137 Tahun 2017 tentang Kode dan Data Wilayah Administrasi Pemerintahan". Minister of Home Affairs Regulation No. 72 of 2019 (PDF) (in Indonesian). Minister of Home Affairs.
  2. ^ "Nama Kecamatan, Ibukota dan Jumlah Desa/Kelurahan di Kota Jambi, 2015". Statistics Indonesia. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Nama Kecamatan, Ibukota dan Jumlah Desa/Kelurahan di Kabupaten Muaro Jambi, 2015". Statistics Indonesia. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  4. ^ "Peraturan Menteri Dalam Negeri Nomor 31 Tahun 2006 tentang Pembentukan, Penghapusan, Dan Penggabungan Kelurahan - Kemendagri". Minister of Home Affairs Regulation No. 31 of 2006 (in Indonesian). Minister of Home Affairs.
  5. ^ "Undang-Undang Republik Indonesia Nomor 6 Tahun 2014 Tentang Desa". Law No. 6 of 2014 (PDF) (in Indonesian). People's Representative Council.
  6. ^ "Qanun Provinsi Aceh Nomor 5 Tahun 2003 Tentang Pemerintahan Gampong". Qanun No. 5 of 2003 (in Indonesian). Government of Aceh.
  7. ^ "Peraturan Daerah Provinsi Sumatera Barat Nomor 7 Tahun 2018 Tentang Nagari". Regional Regulation No. 7 of 2018 (in Indonesian). Government of West Sumatra.
  8. ^ "Mendagri Setujui Perda Desa Adat". Bali Post. 19 September 2019. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  9. ^ "Peraturan Daerah Kabupaten Toraja Utara Nomor 3 Tahun 2014 Tentang Pemerintahan Lembang". Regional Regulation No. 3 of 2014 (in Indonesian). North Toraja Regency.
  10. ^ "Peraturan Gubernur Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta Nomor 25 Tahun 2019 Tentang Pedoman Kelembagaan Urusan Keistimewaan Pada Pemerintah Kabupaten/Kota Dan Kalurahan". Governor Regulation No. 25 of 2019 (in Indonesian). Governor of Yogyakarta.
  11. ^ Post Codes Indonesia 2023 - https://kodepos.nomor.net/_kodepos.php?_i=desa-kodepos&daerah=Provinsi&jobs=&urut=&asc=000101&sby=010000&no1=2&_en=ENGLISH&prov=Aceh+%28NAD%29