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Todd Martin (born July 8, 1970) is an American retired professional tennis player. He reached the Men's Singles final at the 1994 Australian Open and the 1999 US Open and achieved a career-high singles ranking of world No. 4.

Todd Martin
Todd Martin 2008.jpg
Country (sports) United States
ResidencePonte Vedra Beach, Florida, United States
Born (1970-07-08) July 8, 1970 (age 48)[1]
Hinsdale, Illinois, United States
Height6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Turned pro1990
Retired2006
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize moneyUS$ 8,232,355
Singles
Career record411–234
Career titles8
Highest rankingNo. 4 (September 13, 1999)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenF (1994)
French Open4R (1991)
WimbledonSF (1994, 1996)
US OpenF (1999)
Other tournaments
Tour FinalsRR (1999)
Grand Slam CupF (1995)
Olympic Games1R (2000)
Doubles
Career record100–85
Career titles5
Highest rankingNo. 30 (April 26, 1996)
Last updated on: August 15, 2012.

Contents

Playing careerEdit

Martin was born in Hinsdale, Illinois, and played tennis for two years at Northwestern University before turning professional in 1990. His parents lived in Lansing, Michigan, where Martin went to nearby East Lansing High School. At Northwestern, he was a member of the Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He won his first top-level singles title in 1993 at Coral Springs, Florida. Martin traveled with good friend David Helfer for much of the '92 season. Helfer went on to play at Kalamazoo College.

Coached by Robert Van't Hof, 1994 proved to be a breakout year for Martin. At the year's first Grand Slam tournament, he reached the men's singles final at the Australian Open, where he lost in straight sets to No. 1 Pete Sampras, 6-7, 4-6, 4-6. At Wimbledon, he made it to the semifinals, before falling to the eventual champion Sampras; the set that Martin took from Sampras in the match was the only set that Sampras lost during the entire tournament. Martin's third Grand Slam semifinal of 1994 came at the US Open, where he again fell to the eventual champion, this time Andre Agassi. He also captured singles titles at Queen's Club and the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in Memphis, the latter of which was the first back-to-back titles.

Martin was a member of the US team that won the Davis Cup in 1995 (beating Russia 3–2 in the final). He also reached the final of the 1995 Grand Slam Cup, where he lost in straight sets to Goran Ivanišević, 6-7, 3-6, 4-6. He reached the Wimbledon semifinals again in 1996, but eventually lost 10–8 in the fifth set against MaliVai Washington, after holding a 5–1 lead in the final set and serving for the match twice. Martin would later reflect on the outcome and admit that he choked during the crucial moments of the match.[2] He missed most of the 1997 season due to injury, but came back strongly in 1998 when he won two singles titles in Barcelona and Stockholm.

In 1999, Martin had a solid year, reaching the quarterfinals of both the Australian Open and Wimbledon, and reached his second Grand Slam final at the US Open. Along the way, Martin had a memorable battle with Greg Rusedski in the fourth round, in which Rusedski held numerous advantages, including a two sets to love lead, serving for the match in the third set, and a 4–1 advantage in the fifth. Yet Martin was able to prevail, 5–7, 0–6, 7–6, 6–4, 6–4. Martin won 20 of the final 21 points of the match, despite playing with a heavily bandaged leg and dealing with dehydration (he needed intravenous fluids after the match).[3] In the final, he faced Andre Agassi in a five-set contest, which Agassi eventually won, 6–4, 6–7, 6–7, 6–3, 6–2. Martin also won another singles title in Sydney that year, and reached his career-high singles ranking of No. 4.

In 2000, Martin again turned in a strong performance at the U.S. Open, reaching the semifinals before falling to the eventual champion, Marat Safin, in straight sets, 3-6, 6-7, 6-7. As with the previous year's tournament, Martin made another grueling comeback from a two-set deficit in the fourth round, this time against Carlos Moyà, 6–7, 6–7, 6–1, 7–6, 6–2.

Martin was named the ATP's Most Improved Player in 1993, and won its Sportsmanship Award in 1993 and 1994. He was President of ATP Players Council for 1995–97 and 1998–99.

From 1994 to 1996, Martin was coached by Robert Van't Hof. From 1997 to 2002, Martin was coached by Dean Goldfine.

During his career Martin won eight singles and five doubles titles, and earned prize money totaling US$8,254,455. He retired from the professional tour in 2004. He is currently the CEO of the International Tennis Hall of Fame.

Major finalsEdit

Grand Slam finalsEdit

Singles: 2 (0–2)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1994 Australian Open Hard   Pete Sampras 6–7(4–7), 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 1999 US Open Hard   Andre Agassi 4–6, 7–6(7–5), 7–6(7–2), 3–6, 2–6

Masters Series finalsEdit

Singles: 1 (0–1)Edit

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1993 Canada (Montreal) Hard   Mikael Pernfors 6–2, 2–6, 5–7

Career finalsEdit

 
Martin serving at the 2006 U.S. Open.

Singles: 20 (8 titles, 12 runner-ups)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam (0–2)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
Grand Slam Cup (0–1)
ATP Masters Series (0–1)
ATP Championship Series (3–4)
ATP World Series (5–4)
Titles by Surface
Hard (5–7)
Grass (1–0)
Clay (2–3)
Carpet (0–2)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. February 15, 1993 Memphis, Tennessee, United States Hard (i)   Jim Courier 7–5, 6–7(4–7), 6–7(4–7)
Winner 1. May 17, 1993 Coral Springs, Florida, United States Clay   David Wheaton 6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 2. July 26, 1993 Washington D.C., USA Hard   Amos Mansdorf 6–7(3–7), 5–7
Runner-up 3. August 2, 1993 Montreal, Canada Hard   Mikael Pernfors 6–2, 2–6, 5–7
Runner-up 4. October 18, 1993 Tokyo, Japan Carpet   Ivan Lendl 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 5. January 31, 1994 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard   Pete Sampras 6–7(4–7), 4–6, 4–6
Winner 2. February 14, 1994 Memphis, Tennessee, USA Hard   Brad Gilbert 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 6. May 2, 1994 Atlanta, Georgia, USA Clay   Michael Chang 7–6(7–4), 6–7(4–7), 0–6
Runner-up 7. May 9, 1994 Pinehurst, USA Clay   Jared Palmer 4–6, 6–7(5–7)
Winner 3. June 13, 1994 London (Queen's Club), UK Grass   Pete Sampras 7–6(7–4), 7–6(7–4)
Winner 4. February 20, 1995 Memphis, Tennessee, USA Hard   Paul Haarhuis 7–6(7–2), 6–4
Runner-up 8. December 18, 1995 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet   Goran Ivanišević 6–7(4–7), 3–6, 4–6
Winner 5. January 15, 1996 Sydney, Australia Hard   Goran Ivanišević 5–7, 6–3, 6–4
Runner-up 9. February 26, 1996 Memphis, Tennessee, USA Hard (i)   Pete Sampras 4–6, 6–7(2–7)
Runner-up 10. November 4, 1996 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i)   Thomas Enqvist 5–7, 4–6, 6–7(0–7)
Winner 6. April 20, 1998 Barcelona, Spain Clay   Alberto Berasategui 6–2, 1–6, 6–3, 6–2
Winner 7. November 16, 1998 Stockholm, Sweden Hard   Thomas Johansson 6–3, 6–4, 6–4
Winner 8. January 18, 1999 Sydney, Australia Hard   Àlex Corretja 6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Runner-up 11. April 12, 1999 Estoril, Portugal Clay   Albert Costa 6–7(4–7), 6–2, 3–6
Runner-up 12. September 12, 1999 US Open, New York City, United States Hard   Andre Agassi 4–6, 7–6(7–5), 7–6(7–2), 3–6, 2–6

Singles performance timelineEdit

Tournament 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A A 1R F 4R 3R A 2R QF 2R QF 3R A 3R 0 / 10 25–10
French Open A A 4R A 1R 3R 3R 3R A 1R A 1R 1R 2R 2R 1R 0 / 11 11–11
Wimbledon A A A 2R QF SF 4R SF A 4R QF 2R 4R 2R 3R 2R 0 / 12 33–12
US Open A 1R 3R 3R 3R SF 4R 3R 2R 2R F SF 2R 1R 4R 1R 0 / 15 33–15
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 2 0 / 2 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 48 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–1 5–2 3–2 6–4 18–4 11–4 11–4 1–1 5–4 14–3 7–4 8–4 4–4 6–3 3–4 N/A 102–48
Year-End Championships
Tennis Masters Cup Did Not Qualify RR Did Not Qualify 0 / 1 1–2
Grand Slam Cup NH Did Not Qualify 1R SF F Did Not Qualify Not Held 0 / 3 5–3
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells NME A A A 3R 3R QF 3R A 2R QF A A SF 1R 1R 0 / 9 15–9
Miami NME A A A 2R 2R 2R 4R A 3R A A 1R 2R QF 4R 0 / 9 13–9
Monte Carlo NME A A A A A A 1R A 1R A A A A A A 0 / 2 0–2
Rome NME A A A A A 2R 3R A 2R A 1R 1R A A 1R 0 / 6 4–6
Hamburg NME A A A A A A A A A A 2R 2R 1R A A 0 / 3 2–3
Canada NME A A 2R F 2R 3R SF A 2R QF 1R 3R 3R A A 0 / 10 18–10
Cincinnati NME A A 2R 1R A 3R 2R A 3R 2R QF 2R 1R 3R A 0 / 10 13–10
Madrid (Stuttgart) NME A A A 3R 3R 2R 3R QF 3R QF A A A A A 0 / 7 11–7
Paris NME A A A 3R 3R 3R 3R 1R SF 2R A A A A A 0 / 7 8–7
Masters Series SR N/A 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 2 0 / 6 0 / 5 0 / 7 0 / 8 0 / 2 0 / 8 0 / 5 0 / 4 0 / 5 0 / 5 0 / 3 0 / 3 0 / 63 N/A
Annual Win-Loss N/A 0–0 0–0 2–2 10–6 3–5 9–7 12–8 3–2 13–8 8–5 4–4 4–5 7–5 6–3 3–3 N/A 84–63
Year End Ranking 257 269 134 87 13 10 18 12 81 16 7 55 57 47 68 145 N/A

A = did not participate in the tournament

Top 10 winsEdit

Season 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Total
Wins 0 0 0 5 5 3 3 1 5 4 1 2 4 1 0 34
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score MR
1993
1.   Andre Agassi 8 Memphis, United States Hard (i) QF 6–1, 7–6(7–4) 96
2.   Michael Chang 7 Memphis, United States Hard (i) SF 7–6(7–4), 6–4 96
3.   Goran Ivanišević 6 Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom Grass 3R 2–6, 7–6(7–3), 6–7(4–7), 7–5, 6–0 30
4.   Boris Becker 4 Montreal, Canada Hard 3R 7–5, 7–6(7–3) 20
5.   Stefan Edberg 6 Tokyo, Japan Carpet (i) QF 6–4, 6–4 16
1994
6.   Stefan Edberg 4 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard SF 3–6, 7–6(9–7), 7–6(9–7), 7–6(7–4) 12
7.   Stefan Edberg 3 Queen's Club, London, United Kingdom Grass QF 6–3, 6–4 9
8.   Pete Sampras 1 Queen's Club, London, United Kingdom Grass F 7–6(7–4), 7–6(7–4) 9
9.   Stefan Edberg 5 Davis Cup, Gothenburg, Sweden Carpet (i) RR 6–2, 2–6, 6–4, 6–3 6
10.   Sergi Bruguera 4 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet (i) QF 6–4, 7–6(7–5) 10
1995
11.   Pete Sampras 1 Memphis, United States Hard (i) SF 4–6, 7–6(8–6), 6–4 16
12.   Thomas Enqvist 8 Davis Cup, Las Vegas, United States Hard RR 7–5, 7–5, 7–6(7–2) 19
13.   Boris Becker 4 Grand Slam Cup, Munich, Germany Carpet (i) SF 5–7, 6–3, 6–4, 7–6(7–4) 18
1996
14.   Goran Ivanišević 10 Sydney, Australia Hard F 5–7, 6–3, 6–4 17
15.   Thomas Enqvist 6 Memphis, United States Hard (i) QF 6–4, 6–4 22
16.   Goran Ivanišević 5 Vienna, Austria Carpet (i) QF 4–6, 6–3, 6–3 13
1997
17.   Carlos Moyá 7 Stuttgart, Germany Carpet (i) 2R 6–3, 7–6(7–2) 64
1998
18.   Petr Korda 5 Vienna, Austria Carpet (i) 2R 6–3, 7–6(7–2) 29
19.   Karol Kučera 7 Stuttgart, Germany Hard (i) 2R 6–2, 6–4 28
20.   Patrick Rafter 3 Paris, France Carpet (i) 3R 5–7, 7–6(7–5), 7–6(8–6) 26
21.   Andre Agassi 5 Paris, France Carpet (i) QF 4–6, 6–4, 6–4 26
22.   Tim Henman 10 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) SF 4–6, 6–1, 6–2 21
1999
23.   Àlex Corretja 3 Sydney, Australia Hard F 6–3, 7–6(7–5) 16
24.   Marcelo Ríos 6 Indian Wells, United States Hard 3R 4–6, 6–2, 6–2 11
25.   Greg Rusedski 8 US Open, New York, United States Hard 4R 5–7, 0–6, 7–6(7–3), 6–4, 6–4 7
26.   Thomas Enqvist 4 ATP Tour World Championships, Hanover, Germany Hard (i) RR 6–4, 6–1 7
2000
27.   Cédric Pioline 10 US Open, New York, United States Hard 3R 7–6(7–5), 6–3, 6–2 32
2001
28.   Pete Sampras 3 Australian Open, Melbourne, Australia Hard 4R 6–7(2–7), 6–3, 6–4, 6–4 54
29.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6 Montreal, Canada Hard 1R 3–6, 7–6(7–3), 6–4 33
2002
30.   Pete Sampras 10 Adelaide, Australia Hard 1R 3–6, 6–3, 6–4 57
31.   Tommy Haas 6 Indian Wells, United States Hard 2R 6–4, 6–2 64
32.   Yevgeny Kafelnikov 3 Indian Wells, United States Hard QF 7–6(7–5), 6–3 64
33.   Thomas Johansson 9 Toronto, Canada Hard 2R 7–6(7–5), 6–3 47
2003
34.   Andy Roddick 6 Miami, United States Hard 3R 7–6(7–3), 6–4 114

Post-playingEdit

Martin participates on the Outback Champions Series tennis event for the former members of the ATP tour.[4] Martin finished 2006 ranked third and 2007 ranked first in the Outback Series.

Senior tour titlesEdit

CoachingEdit

Martin spent a brief time coaching Mardy Fish.

From late August 2009 until April 12, 2010, Martin was part of the coaching team of Novak Djokovic, at that time the number 3 player on the ATP list. The idea on Djokovic's part was for Martin to be the supplemental, part-time coach working alongside existing full-time coach Marián Vajda who continued in the role. Due to Djokovic's shoulder pain problems, the player wanted to try a different serve motion which was one of Martin's primary tasks.[5] The results weren't satisfactory. Djokovic and Martin parted ways and Vajda went back to being the only coach.[6]

Martin is also a contributor to ESPN.com.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Yahoo UK & Ireland - Sports News - Live Scores - Results". Yahoo Sports.
  2. ^ Collins, Bud. "Long haul ends for Martin". Archived from the original on January 24, 2005 – via The Boston Globe.
  3. ^ "CNN/SI – 1999 US Open – Tennis – Martin rallies for five-set victory – Wednesday September 08, 1999 10:56 AM". cnn.com. Archived from the original on February 13, 2002.
  4. ^ "Tennis Week – Home". sportsmediainc.net. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.
  5. ^ Martin-Djokovic doomed from the outset Archived August 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine;tennis.com blog, April 2010
  6. ^ Novak Djokovic splits from coach Todd Martin Archived May 31, 2011, at the Wayback Machine;BBC, April 12, 2010

External linksEdit