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2013 Philippine general election
Senate (24 seats; 12 up)
16th Congress of the Philippines-Senate composition.svg
House of Representatives (292 seats; all up)
2013 Philippine House of Representatives elections seat diagram.svg
Provincial (80 provinces; all up)
80 governors


80 vice governors
766 board members
Cities (all up)
143 city mayors
143 city vice mayors
1,598 city councilors
Municipalities (all up)
1,491 municipal mayors
1,491 municipal vice mayors
11,932 municipal councilors
Excludes ex officio members for local legislatures

A general election was held in the Philippines on May 13, 2013. It was a midterm election—the officials elected will be sworn in on June 30, 2013, midway through President Benigno Aquino III's term of office.

Being elected are 12 senators (half of the Senate), and all 229 district members of the House of Representatives. These national elections were held on the same day as local and gubernatorial elections as well as a general election in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao. In total, there were 18,022 national and local positions decided.[1]

Barangay officials, including barangay captains, are not to be elected in May. The 2013 Philippine barangay elections were held on October 28, 2013. However the elections for the SK Officials were held at the same time but on September 24, 2013, the Philippine Congress voted to postponement of the election at least a year.[2]

Contents

PreparationsEdit

 
7-Eleven in Baliuag, Bulacan, offering customers a chance to show support for a coalition.

Registration of voters and candidatesEdit

The Commission on Elections (COMELEC) ended the year-long registration of new voters and voters transferring residences nationwide, apart from the general registration of voters in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) on October 31, 2012. Due the commission not allowing an extension of registration, COMELEC offices nationwide were swamped with people on the last day of registration, although the process was mostly peaceful.[3]

The COMELEC held a week-long separate registration for prospective candidates starting from October 1. The commission is expected to release a final list of candidates by October 6. Candidates running for the Senate should file certificates of candidacies at the commission's main office at Intramuros, while those running for the other positions should file at their local COMELEC offices.[4]

The commission completed the cleansing of the voters list in the ARMM, rejecting 236,489 names. Most were either double registrants or were too young to vote.[5]

Absentee votingEdit

Registered voters who are members of the military, police, civil service and media who cannot vote at their voting precincts on election day may opt to register for local absentee voting.

OverseasEdit

The commission removed 238,557 overseas absentee voters from the voters' list after failing to manifest their intention to vote. Out of about 915,000 overseas voters, more than 200,000 had not voted in two preceding elections and were sent notices; only 29 replied and were not removed from the voters' list.[6] However, after being slammed by the overseas Filipinos on their disenfranchisement, the commission reinstated the 238,557 overseas absentee voters; they also extended the deadline for the period of filing of the manifestation of intent to vote until election day itself.[7] Overseas absentee voting started on April 13, and continued until election day. Depending on the diplomatic mission, a voter may vote personally or via the mail, and via manually or via the automated system. Voting in Saudi Arabia began on April 16 after the Saudi customs refused to release the voting paraphernalia in time for April 13.[8]

LocalEdit

Members of the police, military, members of the civil service and the media who had previously registered for local absentee voting voted for the Senate and party-list elections from April 28 to 30. Those which failed to vote at this period are still eligible to vote on election day itself.[9] Out of the 18,332 voters that registered, 12,732 were found to be qualified by the commission and were allowed to vote. However, the commission said that the turnout was low; chairman Sixto Brillantes rued the low turnout, pointing out that the election was not on a presidential election year as the cause.[10]

CampaigningEdit

On January 13, the election period began. This allowed the commission to impose prohibitions on 24 activities, including a nationwide ban on guns and other deadly weapons on that day.[11]

The commission released regulations on online campaigning on January 16. The COMELEC resolution stipulated that online propaganda can only be published on a website thrice a week, and allows advertisements in the form of pop-ups, banners and the like. Campaigning via social websites such as Twitter and Facebook would not be regulated. This is the first election the commission has regulated online campaigning.[12] The commission dramatically reduced the amount of airtime candidates and parties can use during the campaign period. Previously, the commission imposed a 120-minute airtime limit on every TV station and 180 minutes on radio stations; for 2013, the commission capped the cumulative airtime to 120 minutes on TV and 180 minutes on radio for all networks. This was a reversion on the 2004, 2007 and 2010 elections, and returned to the original 2001 limit. The Fair Elections Act was not clear on whether the 120 minutes for TV and 180 minutes for radio were for every station or for all stations.[13]

The commission, in a cost-saving measure, announced on January 18 that they ruled to use plastic seals with serial numbers instead of padlocks in securing ballot boxes. Chairman Sixto Brillantes remarked that padlocks are bulky and expensive, as compared to plastic seals cannot be tampered with and are cheaper. The commission expects to save more than 50% if plastic seals will be used; plastic seals would cost the commission P14 million, while padlocks would have cost them P34.2 million. The commission also announced that voters would no longer place their thumbprints on the ballot; instead signatures would be used.[14]

On January 23, the commission announced that it will be regulating the use of political colors, logos and insignias during the campaign. It monitored television personalities on whether they are being paid to wear colors that are connected to certain candidates.[15] The commission also imposed a right of reply provision, that would give equal time and space for charges against candidates. This was also the first time the commission imposed the rule; the rule has been heavily opposed by the press, but Commission Rene Sarmiento said the rule balances the freedom of expression and public interest.[16]

On mid-April, the Supreme Court issued a temporary restraining order on limiting the airtime of political advertisements by candidates by the Commission on Elections. Voting 9–6, the high court favored the petition by Team PNoy senatorial candidate Alan Peter Cayetano to halt the implementation of Resolution No. 9615 and its amendment, Resolution No. 9631.[17] The airtime limit presently stands at an aggregate of 120 minutes in all TV networks and 180 minutes in all radio stations for all national candidates and an aggregate of 60 minutes in all TV networks and 90 minutes in all radio stations for all local candidates. Sixto Brillantes, dismayed and the high court rulings adverse to the election commission threatened to resign but later relented after a meeting with President Aquino.[18]

Source codeEdit

Smartmatic, the source of the machines that were used in the automated elections, is embroiled in a dispute with Dominion Voting Systems over the ownership of the software that were used by the machines. This source code is mandated to be released by law.[19] By early April, chairman Sixto Brillantes said that the deal to release the source was "97 percent" of being completed.[20] However, on late April, Brillantes said that "I’m no longer interested because it’s too late already. Election day is so close and even if they give us the source code now, it can no longer be reviewed for lack of time." Brillantes assured the public that despite the nonexistence of the source code, the machines can still work via the binary code.[21] On early May, senatorial candidate Richard Gordon petitioned to the Supreme Court the commission to order the latter to reveal the source code to local review groups. Gordon, who authored the law mandating the automated elections, said that the commission does not have the discretion on whether or not political parties can review the source code.[22]

A few days after Gordon's petition, or exactly a week before the election, Brillantes announced that Smartmatic and Dominion signed an agreement releasing the source code, and that it would be presented to the public on May 8. Critics scored that the late release of the source code is not possible with only a few days remaining before the elections.[23] On May 9, Dominion turned the source code, which was in a CD, to the commission. Dominion, the commission and SLI Global Solutions, which had certified the source code months earlier, encrypted the source code on a computer provided by the commission. The source code was then burned anew to a separate CD-R, placed inside a safety box, and was delivered to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas to be kept in a vault.[24]

BansEdit

Gun banEdit

The commission issued a nationwide gun ban that started on January 13, and will last for five months, until June 12, 2013, or a month after the election.[25] By April 19, the number of violations to the gun ban was at 2,053.[26]

Liquor banEdit

The commission also issued an "expanded" liquor ban: instead of banning intoxicating substances on election day and election eve, the commission included the four days preceding the election. Foreigners and certain hotels and similar establishments were exempted.[27] However, the Supreme Court of the Philippines issued a restraining order reverting to the two-day liquor ban after it upheld a petition by the Food and Beverage Inc. and International Wines and Spirits Association.[28] The commission then withdrew its resolution instituting the five-day liquor ban, reverting the ban to two days as originally intended by law.[29]

Money banEdit

In order to curb vote buying, the commission issued a resolution prohibiting bank withdrawals of more than 100,000 pesos.[30] However, Secretary of Justice Leila de Lima expressed reservations on the constitutionality of the so-called "money ban",[31] and the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas has explicitly stated that it would not comply with the commission's resolution.[32]

The commission subsequently released a supplemental resolution amending the "money ban", which gives the banks the discretion on whether to allow bank withdrawals or not.[33] However, the Supreme Court issued a status quo ante order against the "money ban", acting upon a petition by the Bankers Association of the Philippines.[34]

ResultsEdit

Polls opened at 7:00 and there were over 52 million eligible voters to vote for the more than 18,000 positions. In addition, police and military forces were put on higher alert for expectations of violence which had resulted in about 60 deaths since campaigning began.[35]

CongressEdit

The congressmen elected in 2013, together with those senators elected in the 2010 elections shall comprise the 16th Congress of the Philippines.

SenateEdit

 
Proportion of votes garnered by each slate per province and some cities.

Twelve of the 24 seats in the Senate, or the seats up in odd-numbered years, are up for election, including the seat vacated in 2010 by the current president, Benigno Aquino III. Elections to the Senate are via plurality-at-large voting: the voter having 12 votes per candidate, and the candidates with the 12 highest number of votes being elected.

e • d Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine Senate election results per party
Party Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Not up Gains Holds Losses Won End 15th 16th +/−
Start %
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance)[s 1] 80,257,922 26.97%   11.11% 8 1 2 1 2 0 3 3 5 21%   2
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 45,531,389 15.30%   1.40% 3 3 2 0 3 0 3 5 5 21%  
Liberal (Liberal Party) 33,678,948 11.32%   15.02% 3 1 3 0 1 0 1 4 4 17%  
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 30,204,220 10.15%   5.63% 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 8%  
LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) 16,005,564 5.38%   5.38% 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 4%  
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party – People's Power) 14,725,114 4.95%   2.72% 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 4%  
Akbayan (Akbayan Citizens' Action Party) 10,944,843 3.68%   3.68% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
Bangon Pilipinas (Rise Up, Philippines) 6,932,985 2.33%   0.15% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 4,295,151 1.44%   1.44% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
Ang Kapatiran (Alliance for the Common Good) 2,975,641 1.00%   0.16% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
DPP (Democratic Party of the Philippines) 2,500,967 0.84%   0.84% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
Social Justice Society 1,240,104 0.42%   0.42% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0%  
Lakas (People Power-Christian Muslim Democrats) Not participating 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 2 8%   1
PRP (People's Reform Party) Not participating 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 4%  
Independent 48,332,949 16.24%   8.16% 5 2 0 0 2 0 2 3 3 13%  
Vacancy 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0%   1
Total votes 297,625,797 N/A 33 12 12 1 10 1 12 24 24 100%  
Turnout 40,144,207 75.77%   1.43%
Registered voters 52,982,173 100%   3.24%
  1. ^ An electoral alliance of the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban) and of the Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino (PMP), UNA has candidates from both parties, with all running under the UNA banner. However, one candidate is running under the PDP-Laban banner and is not included in these figures. Therefore, figures are as compared from the PMP's 2010 figures.

House of RepresentativesEdit

All 292 seats in the House of Representatives are up. A voter had two votes in the House of Representatives elections: one for party-list representatives, which shall comprise at most 20% of the seats, and another for district representatives, which shall comprise the rest of the seats.

District electionsEdit
 
Election results per district.

Elections are via first past the post system: the candidate with the highest number of votes wins that district's seat in the House of Representatives. There are 234 seats to be disputed.

e • d Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts
Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Vacant wins Elected %[hd 1] +/−[hd 2]
Liberal (Liberal Party) 10,557,265 38.31%   18.38% 160 93 22 84 9 4 109 37.7%   16
Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 100,405 0.36%   0.36% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Kusug Agusanon (Progressive Agusan) 71,436 0.26%   0.26% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
KKK (Struggle for Peace, Progress and Justice) 54,425 0.20%   0.16% 2 [hd 3] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Akbayan (Akbayan Citizens' Action Party) 34,239 0.12%   0.12% 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0.0%   1
Liberal coalition 10,817,770 39.22%   19.77% 165 95 22 85 9 4 112 38.6%   17
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 4,800,907 17.36%   1.40% 71 40 4 34 6 4 42 14.4%   2
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 3,140,381 9.31%   9.31% 55 11 3 5 6 0 8 2.7%   3
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 281,320 1.02%   0.29% 13 [hd 4] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 144,030 0.52%   1.98% 11 [hd 5] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 94,966 0.34%   0.14% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Magdiwang (Magdiwang Party) 23,253 0.08%   0.06% 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%   1
1-Cebu (One Cebu) 21,936 0.08%   0.08% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
UNA coalition 3,705,886 11.36%   3.55% 82 12 3 7 6 0 10 3.4%   2
NUP (National Unity Party) 2,402,097 8.69%   8.69% 34 30 0 24 6 0 24 8.2%   6
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 2,364,400 8.55%   2.79% 44 20 5 13 7 0 18 6.2%   2
Lakas (People Power–Christian Muslim Democrats) 1,472,464 5.33%   32.09% 24 18 0 13 5 1 14 4.8%   4
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 97,982 0.35%   0.09% 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Kambilan (Shield and Fellowship of Kapampangans) 96,433 0.35%   0.35% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Unang Sigaw (First Cry of Nueva Ecija–Party of Change) 94,952 0.35%   0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
KBL (New Society Movement) 94,484 0.34%   0.12% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
United Negros Alliance 91,467 0.34%   0.34% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
LDP (Struggle of the Democratic Filipinos) 90,070 0.33%   0.15% 4 1 1 1 0 0 2 0.7%   1
Hugpong sa Tawong Lungsod (Party of the People of the City) 65,324 0.24%   0.24% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 68,281 0.25%   0.25% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Sulong Zambales (Forward Zambales) 60,280 0.22%   0.22% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0%   1
PPP (Party of Change for Palawan) 57,485 0.21%   0.21% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Hugpong sa Tawong Lungsod (Party of the People of the City) 65,324 0.24%   0.24% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Sulong Zambales (Forward Zambales) 60,280 0.22%   0.22% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0%   1
PPP (Party of Change for Palawan) 57,485 0.21%   0.21% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Ang Kapatiran (Alliance for the Common Good) 19,019 0.07%   0.06% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
AZAP (Forward Zamboanga Party) 15,881 0.06%   0.06% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PMM (Workers' and Farmers' Party) 10,396 0.04%   2.59% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PLM (Party of the Laboring Masses) 10,196 0.04%   0.04% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 3,870 0.01%   0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Ompia (Ompia Party) 1,682 0.01%   0.01% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
DPP (Democratic Party of the Philippines) 1,071 0.00%   0.00% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Independent 1,665,324 6.02%   0.93% 172 4 4 1 3 1 6 2.1%   2
Vacancy 5 0 0 5 0 0.0%   5
Total 27,584,741 100% N/A 628 229 44 180 44 10 234 80.1%   5
Valid votes 27,584,741 About 8.3 million votes are not included as they weren't included in the Transparency server. It is unknown which of those are valid or invalid votes.
Invalid votes 4,148,957
Turnout 40,144,207 75.77%   1.43
Registered voters (without overseas voters) 52,014,648 100%   2.54%
  1. ^ Of all 292 House members, including party-list representatives.
  2. ^ From last composition of the 15th Congress.
  3. ^ All incumbent KKK representatives are co-nominated by the Liberal Party.
  4. ^ All incumbent PDP-Laban representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.
  5. ^ All incumbent PMP representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.
Party-list electionEdit

Elections are via a closed list modified Hare quota system with a 2% election threshold. A voter may vote for one party. The parties are then ranked in descending order of votes. In the first round of seat allocation, the parties that win at least 2% of the vote win one seat each. In the second round, the remaining seats are distributed via the Hare quota, with remainders disregarded; however, a party may not win more than three seats. If the number of seats that are already distributed does not equal the number of seats reserved for party-list representatives, one seat shall be awarded to every party that did not win seats in the second round, including parties that did not surpass the 2% threshold, until the seats reserved for party-list representatives are filled up.

Major parties are prohibited from running in the party-list election, which was instituted to allow marginalized sectors of society to join the political process. With 234 district seats, and party-list seats should comprise at most 20% of the seats, there were 58 seats up for election

e • d Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives[36]
Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Swing Up Won +/−
Buhay 1,270,608 4.60%   0.33% 2 3   1
A TEACHER 1,042,863 3.77%   1.66% 2 2  
Bayan Muna 954,724 3.46%   0.90% 2 2  
1-CARE 934,915 3.38%   0.75% 2 2  
Akbayan 829,149 3.00%   0.62% 2 2  
Abono 768,265 2.78%   0.16% 2 2  
AKB 763,316 2.76%   2.44% 3 2   1
OFW Family 752,229 2.72%   2.72% 0 2   2
GABRIELA 715,250 2.59%   0.84% 2 2  
Coop-NATCCO 642,005 2.32%   0.90% 2 2  
AGAP 592,463 2.14%   0.38% 1 2   1
CIBAC 584,906 2.12%   0.11% 2 2  
Magdalo 567,426 2.05%   2.05% 0 2   2
An Waray 541,205 1.96%   0.47% 2 2  
ABAMIN 466,114 1.69%   0.40% 1 1  
ACT Teachers 454,346 1.64%   0.37% 1 1  
Butil 439,557 1.59%   0.14% 1 1  
AMIN 382,267 1.38%   0.83% 0 1   1
ACT-CIS 377,165 1.37%   1.37% 0 1   1
Kalinga 372,383 1.35%   0.56% 1 1  
LPGMA 370,897 1.34%   0.09% 1 1  
TUCP 369,286 1.34%   0.50% 1 1  
YACAP 366,621 1.33%   0.18% 1 1  
AGRI 366,170 1.33%   1.16% 0 1   1
ANGKLA 360,497 1.30%   1.30% 0 1   1
ABS 359,587 1.30%   0.42% 1 1  
DIWA 341,820 1.24%   0.42% 1 1  
Kabataan 341,292 1.24%   0.19% 1 1  
Anakpawis 321,745 1.16%   0.37% 1 1  
Alay Buhay 317,355 1.15%   0.59% 1 1  
AAMBIS-Owa 312,312 1.13%   0.09% 1 1  
1-SAGIP 287,739 1.04%   1.04% 0 1   1
AVE 270,431 0.98%   0.24% 1 1  
ATING Koop 267,763 0.97%   0.37% 1 1  
Abang Lingkod 260,923 0.94%   0.83% 0 1   1
1-BAP 245,529 0.89%   0.89% 0 1   1
ABAKADA 244,754 0.89%   0.56% 0 1   1
AMA 244,026 0.88%   0.67% 0 1   1
Ang Nars 243,360 0.88%   0.88% 0 1   1
ANAC-IP 241,505 0.87%   0.87% 0 1   1
Agbiag! 240,841 0.87%   0.03% 1 1  
Append 236,353 0.86%   0.86% 0 1   1
ALIF 223,857 0.81%   0.03% 1 0   1
Ating Guro 214,080 0.77%   0.77% 0 0  
PBA 212,298 0.77%   0.11% 1 0   1
Aangat Tayo 207,855 0.75%   0.14% 1 0   1
Ang Kasangga 202,456 0.73%   0.28% 1 0   1
BH 190,001 0.69%   0.31% 1 0   1
KAKUSA 175,096 0.63%   0.17% 1 0   1
PISTON 174,976 0.63%   0.63% 0 0  
Bayani 165,906 0.60%   0.34% 0 0  
AKMA-PTM 165,784 0.60%   0.04% 0 0  
ADA 164,702 0.60%   0.50% 0 0  
1-AALALAY 162,552 0.59%   0.59% 0 0  
Abante Retirees 161,915 0.59%   0.59% 0 0  
Katribu 153,844 0.56%   0.17% 0 0  
ALE 153,616 0.56%   0.56% 0 0  
1JAMG 153,072 0.55%   0.25% 0 0  
ABROAD 150,854 0.55%   0.03% 1 0   1
VFP 148,591 0.54%   0.01% 0 0  
APEC 146,392 0.53%   0.54% 1 0   1
Pasang Masda 134,944 0.49%   0.37% 0 0  
1 ang Pamilya 131,954 0.48%   0.26% 1 0   1
AGHAM 130,694 0.47%   0.36% 1 0   1
Ang Prolife 129,989 0.47%   0.47% 0 0  
PACYAW 123,791 0.45%   0.04% 0 0  
1-UTAK 123,489 0.45%   0.30% 1 0   1
1-LAMBAT 119,505 0.43%   0.43% 0 0  
1-PABAHAY 117,516 0.43%   0.43% 0 0  
Akap Bata 116,837 0.42%   0.05% 0 0  
Abante KA 111,625 0.40%   0.31% 0 0  
FIRM 24-K 103,316 0.37%   0.04% 0 0  
ABA 102,021 0.37%   0.10% 0 0  
Ang Ladlad 100,958 0.37%   0.02% 0 0  
AANI 93,581 0.34%   0.14% 0 0  
AA-KASOSYO 88,603 0.32%   0.27% 1 0   1
1BRO-PGBI 87,247 0.32%   0.32% 0 0  
PWD 86,854 0.31%   0.31% 0 0  
Sanlakas 86,145 0.31%   0.31% 0 0  
ATM 81,378 0.29%   0.20% 0 0  
AKO 80,398 0.29%   0.02% 0 0  
ADAM 77,206 0.28%   0.06% 0 0  
ARAL 76,838 0.28%   0.14% 0 0  
KAAKBAY 71,534 0.26%   0.29% 0 0  
ANG MINERO 67,807 0.25%   0.12% 0 0  
ALIM 65,119 0.24%   0.06% 0 0  
AASENSO 65,095 0.24%   0.24% 0 0  
1-AAMOVER 59,844 0.22%   0.22% 0 0  
AMA 58,886 0.21%   0.21% 0 0  
1GANAP/Guardians 58,406 0.21%   0.20% 0 0  
AKO BAHAY 51,806 0.19%   0.01% 0 0  
Migrante 51,431 0.19%   0.19% 0 0  
Alyansa ng OFW 51,069 0.18%   0.13% 0 0  
UMALAB KA 45,492 0.16%   0.16% 0 0  
ARC 45,120 0.16%   0.04% 0 0  
ABP 44,324 0.16%   0.03% 0 0  
A BLESSED 43,829 0.16%   0.05% 0 0  
AAMA 42,853 0.16%   0.01% 0 0  
ADING 42,819 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
ARARO 41,257 0.15%   0.35% 0 0  
UNI-MAD 41,023 0.15%   0.05% 0 0  
AMOR Seaman 40,955 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
MTM PHILS 40,218 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
AWAT Mindanao 39,206 0.14%   0.01% 0 0  
Green Force 30,581 0.11%   0.04% 0 0  
Agila 29,739 0.11%   0.25% 0 0  
AMS 27,883 0.10%   0.04% 0 0  
Alagad 27,400 0.10%   0.68% 1 0   1
AFPSEGCO 24,369 0.09%   0.04% 0 0  
KLBP 21,900 0.08%   0.09% 0 0  
1-ABILIDAD 19,381 0.07%   0.07% 0 0  
ALLUMAD 7,642 0.03%   0.01% 0 0  
Vacancy 1[p 1]   1
Valid votes 27,630,854 68.83%   8.00% 57 56   1
Senior Citizens 679,168 2.46%   1.96% 1[p 1] 0   1
ANAD 201,050 1 0   1
BINHI 185,987 0 0  
BANTAY 113,989 0 0  
COCOFED 103,626 0 0  
Atong Paglaum 95,490 0 0  
1ST KABAGIS 94,651 0 0  
SMART 84,803 0 0  
KAP 57,152 0 0  
A-IPRA 28,263 0 0  
AG 4,259 1 0   1
Invalid and blank votes 12,513,353 31.17%   8.00%
Total turnout 40,144,207 77.19%   2.85%
Registered voters 52,006,910 100%   1.33%
  1. ^ a b Senior Citizens originally had two representatives. When one of the Senior Citizens representatives resigned, the Commission on Elections refused to elevate the next person on the list as an elected representative after it was revealed to be a part of a term-sharing agreement which the commission prohibited.

Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao electionsEdit

Originally scheduled for 2011, Congress postponed the election to 2013 in order for reforms to be put in place and for the regional election to be synchronized with the 2013 election. All seats of regional elected officials are up.

Local electionsEdit

 
Gubernatorial election results.

All local government units (LGUs) had their elections on this day. Positions up are mayors, vice mayors, councilors, and if applicable, governors, vice governors and board members.

Position Lakas LDP LP NP NPC NUP PDP
Laban
PMP UNA Others Ind. Total
Regional governor 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Regional vice governor 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Regional assemblyman 0 0 20 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 24
Provincial governor 1 0 36 7 14 8 1 0 4 4 5 80
Provincial vice governor 3 2 36 11 12 4 0 0 5 2 5 80
Provincial board members 18 5 300 102 112 74 4 3 44 47 57 766
City mayor 6 0 61 9 22 10 3 1 16 10 5 143
City vice mayor 4 2 57 12 19 11 1 1 16 13 7 143
City councilors 41 10 647 153 206 88 24 6 169 135 119 1,598
Municipal mayor 35 9 604 150 224 128 18 21 113 97 87 1,491
Municipal vice mayor 33 11 570 154 220 112 16 13 114 87 154 1,491
Municipal councilors 282 66 4,629 1,219 1,560 882 132 91 841 685 1,834 11,932

ControversiesEdit

Election watchdog AES Watch has called the 2013 elections "a technology and political disaster" due to several controversies, including premature proclamation of candidates and irregular decisions made during the canvassing.[37]

PCOS transmission issuesEdit

On the day of elections, an estimated 18,000 voting machines, representing a quarter of the total 78,000 machines, experienced problems in transmitting the voting results.[38] The Comelec claimed that the problems were caused not by the machines themselves, but by corrupted compact flash cards and issues with the cellular network coverage. Comelec Chairman Sixto Brillantes claimed that the Comelec was aware of problems with cellular network coverage, but deliberately kept it from the public until after the election.[38] The poll watchdog AES Watch issued a statement on May 18, saying that up to 8.6 million votes had been affected, or possibly disenfranchised.[38]

Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company, the Philippines' largest telecommunications company, released a statement dismissing the Comelec's allegations of cellular network problems, saying that the combined networks of Smart Communications and Sun Cellular covered every city and municipality in the country, and no unusually heavy traffic was recorded on election day.[39]

The Comelec failed to meet its self-imposed deadline of proclaiming winners in the senatorial election 48 hours after the end of the voting period.[39]

Senatorial winners proclamationEdit

The COMELEC proclaimed the first six senatorial winners of the election on May 16, though only 20 percent of election results had been canvassed.[37] Three more winners were proclaimed the following day.[37] The winners were proclaimed alphabetically rather than by the number of votes garnered, since the vote totals had not yet been finalized.[37] Winning candidates Nancy Binay and Koko Pimentel declined to attend the proclamation, on the advice of their lawyers.[37]

Lack of source code reviewEdit

Following the election, a poll watchdog alleged that the Comelec failed to do a review of the source code for voting machines used in the election, in violation of the Automated Election Systems Law.[40] Under the law, the technical committee must have documented certification that the all hardware and software components were operating properly at least three months before the elections.[40]

Vote-rigging speculationEdit

Speculations of election fraud turned up following the elections, as the vote canvassing revealed a "60-30-10" pattern of votes—wherein administration, opposition, and independent senatorial candidates consistently obtained 60 percent, 30 percent, and 10 percent of the votes respectively.[40]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "All systems go for the filing of COCs starting Monday --Comelec". Philippine News Agency. September 30, 2012. Retrieved October 1, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ "SK polls postponed; Congress says no holdovers" - Philippine Star
  3. ^ Cayabyab, Marc Jayson (October 31, 2012). "Chaos marks last day of voters' registration in QC". GMA News Online. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  4. ^ Zurbano, Joel E. (October 12, 2012). "Comelec adds new rules to COCs". Manila Standard-Today. Retrieved January 19, 2013.[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "Comelec rejects 236,489 ARMM 'voters'". Rappler.com. November 22, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  6. ^ "Over 200,000 voters abroad delisted from official voters' list — Comelec". GMA News Online. January 18, 2013. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  7. ^ Uy, Jocelyn R. (March 6, 2013). "Comelec reinstates 238,000 OFWs on absentee voters' list". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  8. ^ Crisostomo, Shiela (April 13, 2013). "Overseas absentee voting starts today". Philippine Star. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  9. ^ "3-day local absentee voting starts". GMA News Online. April 13, 2013. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  10. ^ Crisostomo, Shiela (May 2, 2013). "'Absentee voting turnout disappointing'". Philippine Star. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  11. ^ Rufo, Aries (January 13, 2013). "24 election-related bans taking place". Rappler.com. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  12. ^ "For the first time, Comelec to regulate online campaign gimmicks". GMA News Online. January 16, 2013. Retrieved January 19, 2013.
  13. ^ Fonbuena, Carmela (January 16, 2013). "Huge cuts in bets' TV, radio ad minutes". Rappler.com. Retrieved January 22, 2013.
  14. ^ Santos, Matikas (January 18, 2013). "Comelec uses plastic seals instead of padlocks". INQUIRER.net. Retrieved January 18, 2013.
  15. ^ Crisostomo, Shiela (January 23, 2013). "Comelec to regulate campaign colors as poll propaganda". Philippine Star. Retrieved January 23, 2013.
  16. ^ Cayabyab, Marc Jayson (January 23, 2013). "Comelec to impose right of reply rule for candidates in May polls". GMA News Online. Retrieved January 23, 2013.
  17. ^ "SC stops Comelec's airtime limits". Rappler.com. April 16, 2013. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  18. ^ "PNoy to Brillantes: Don't quit now". ABS-CBN News.com. April 19, 2013. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  19. ^ Jaymalin, Mayen (December 3, 2012). "Smartmatic insists on authenticity of PCOS source code". Philippine Star. Retrieved April 19, 2013.
  20. ^ Santos, Tina G. (April 4, 2013). "Comelec close to deal with Dominion, Smartmatic on release of source code". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  21. ^ Crisostomo, Shiela (April 23, 2013). "Brillantes gives up on source code review". Philippine Star. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  22. ^ Macaraig, Ayee (May 3, 2013). "Gordon brings source code issue to SC". Rappler. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  23. ^ Cruz, RG (May 6, 2013). "Comelec finally opens PCOS source code for review". ABS-CBNnews.com. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  24. ^ Santos, Matikas (May 9, 2013). "Comelec presents PCOS source code". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  25. ^ Go, Miriam Grace (January 12, 2013). "Gun ban starts amid tense political mood". Rappler. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  26. ^ "Gun ban-related arrests break 2,000-mark". GMA News Online. April 19, 2013. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  27. ^ "Liquor ban to start May 9". ABS-CBNnews.com. May 7, 2013. Retrieved May 7, 2013.
  28. ^ Louis Bacani and Dennis Carcamo (May 8, 2013). "SC stops liquor ban from May 9–11". Philippine Star. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  29. ^ Marueñas, Mark (May 8, 2013). "SC cuts five-day liquor ban to two days". GMA News Online. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  30. ^ Esmaquel, Paterno II (May 7, 2013). "Comelec: 'Money ban' to fight vote buying". Rappler. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  31. ^ "Bangko Sentral refuses to comply with Comelec order limiting cash withdrawals". GMA News Online. May 8, 2013. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Legaspi, Amita (May 7, 2013). "Bangko Sentral refuses to comply with Comelec order limiting cash withdrawals". GMA News Online. Retrieved May 10, 2013.
  33. ^ "Amid stiff opposition, Comelec softens up on 'money ban'". GMA News Online. May 10, 2013. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  34. ^ Aning, Jerome (May 11, 2013). "Supreme Court stops poll money ban". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 11, 2013.
  35. ^ "Voting closes in Philippine mid-term polls". www.aljazeera.com.
  36. ^ "List of Candidates With Votes Obtained for Partylist". COMELEC.gov.ph. June 1, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  37. ^ a b c d e Dinglasan, Rouchelle D. (May 18, 2013). "Poll watchdog calls 2013 elections a 'technology and political disaster'". GMA News Online. GMA News and Current Affairs. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  38. ^ a b c Santos, Matikas (May 23, 2013). "18,000 PCOS machines suffered transmission woes, says poll chief". Inquirer.net. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  39. ^ a b Bacani, Louis (May 24, 2013). "PLDT: No signal woes, network traffic during elections". Philstar.com. The Philippine Star. Retrieved May 26, 2013.
  40. ^ a b c Aning, Jerome (May 29, 2013). "Comelec failed to review source code, says poll watchdog". Inquirer.net. Philippine Daily Inquirer, Inc. Retrieved May 26, 2013.

External linksEdit