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2013 Philippine House of Representatives elections

  (Redirected from Philippine House of Representatives elections, 2013)

The 2013 Philippine House of Representatives elections were the 33rd lower house elections in the Philippines. They were held on May 13, 2013 to elect members to the House of Representatives of the Philippines that would serve in the 16th Congress of the Philippines from June 30, 2013 to June 30, 2016.

2013 Philippine House of Representatives elections

← 2010 May 13, 2013 2016 →

All 292 seats in the House of Representatives of the Philippines.
147 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Philippine House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte.jpg NPC NUP
Leader Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. Mark L. Mendoza Pablo P. Garcia
Party Liberal NPC NUP
Leader's seat Quezon City–4th Batangas–4th Cebu–2nd (lost)
Last election 45 seats, 20.02% 31 seats, 15.90% Did not contest
Seats before 93+2 coalition 39 30
Seats won 111+4 coalition 43 24
Seat change Increase 20 Increase 3 Decrease 6
Popular vote 10,705,477 4,799,890 2,355,195
Percentage 39.03% 17.50% 8.59%
Swing Increase 19.26% Increase 1.53% Increase 8.59%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  NP Lakas
Leader Mark Villar Ferdinand Martin Romualdez Toby Tiangco
Party Nacionalista Lakas UNA
Leader's seat Las Piñas Leyte–1st Navotas
Last election 27 seats, 11.73% 107 seats, 37.84% Did not participate
Seats before 20 22 11+1 coalition
Seats won 18 14 8+2 coalition
Seat change Decrease 2 Decrease 4 Decrease 2
Popular vote 2,340,932 1,363,126 3,127,769
Percentage 8.53% 4.97% 11.40%
Swing Decrease 2.81% Decrease 32.44% Increase 7.85%

2013 Philippine House of Representatives district election results.png
District election results; results for Metro Manila is magnified at the top right.

Speaker before election

Feliciano Belmonte, Jr.
Liberal

Elected Speaker

Feliciano Belmonte, Jr.
Liberal

The Philippines uses parallel voting for the House of Representatives: first past the post on 234 single member districts, and via closed party lists on a 2% election threshold computed via a modified Hare quota (3-seat cap and no remainders) on 58 seats, with parties with less than 1% of the first preference vote winning one seat each if 20% of the party-list seats are not filled up. Major parties are not allowed to participate in the party-list election.

While the concurrent Senate election features the two major coalitions in Team PNoy and the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA), the constituent parties of the coalitions contested the lower house election separately, and in some districts, candidates from the same coalition in the Senate are contesting a single seat. Campaigns for the House of Representatives are done on a district-by-district basis; there is no national campaign conducted by the parties. No matter the election result, the party of the president usually controls the House of Representatives, via a grand coalition of almost all parties. Only the ruling Liberal Party can win a majority, as it is the only party to put up candidates in a majority of seats.

After release of preliminary results, the Liberal Party emerged as the largest party in the chamber. Its coalition partners also held most of their seats. Incumbent Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. is expected to be easily reelected as the Speaker of the 16th Congress.

Contents

Electoral systemEdit

The election for seats in the House of Representatives is done via parallel voting. A voter has two votes: one for one's local district, and another via the party-list system. A candidate is not allowed to stand for both ballots, and parties participating in the district elections would have to ask for permission on the Commission on Elections, with major parties not allowed to participate in the party-list election.

Election via the districtsEdit

Each district sends one representative to the House of Representatives, with the winner with the highest number of votes winning that district's seat. The representatives from the districts comprise at most 80% of the seats.

Election via the party-list systemEdit

In the party-list system, the parties contesting the election represent a sector, or several sectors, or an ethnic group. In determining the winners, the entire country is treated as one "district". Each party that surpasses the 2% election threshold automatically wins one seat, they can win an additional number of seats in proportion to the number of votes they received, but they can't have more than three seats. The representatives elected via the party-list system, also known as "sectoral representatives" should comprise at least 20% of the seats. However, since the winners from the parties that surpass the 2% threshold had not reached the 20% quota ever since the party-list system was instituted, the parties that received less than 1% of the first preference vote are given one seat each until the 20% quota has been filled up.[1]

CampaigningEdit

The parties contesting the district elections campaign at the district level; there is no national-level campaigning. While no party has been able to win a majority of seats in the House of Representatives since the 1987 elections, the party of the incumbent president had usually controlled the chamber in the phenomenon known locally as the "Padrino System" or patronage politics, with other parties aligning themselves with the president's policies in exchange for pork barrel and future political favors.

While the parties contesting the Senate election grouped themselves into two major electoral alliances (Team PNoy and the United Nationalist Alliance), the constituent parties of those alliances separately contested the elections to the House of Representatives. However, as stated above, the parties will again coalesce once the 16th Congress of the Philippines convenes.

District changesEdit

Reapportioning (redistricting) the number of seats is either via national reapportionment after the release of every census, or via piecemeal redistricting for every province or city. National reapportionment has not happened since the 1987 constitution took effect, and aside from piecemeal redistricting, the apportionment was based on the ordinance from the constitution, which was in turn based from the 1980 census.

These are the following laws pertaining to redistricting that were passed by Congress. While a locality that has a minimum of 250,000 people is constitutionally entitled to one district representative, Congress should enact a law in order for it to take effect. The creation of new districts may be politically motivated, in order to prevent political allies (or even opponents) from contesting one seat.

Bukidnon, Cotabato, Palawan and Quezon City received additional representatives in the upcoming Congress.

House Bill No. District(s) Current Proposed Note Status
4111 Cotabato 2 3 Signed into law - RA 10177[2]
4245 Quezon City–2nd 1 3 Quezon City-2nd to be split into three districts. Signed into law - RA 10170[3]
5236[4] Bukidnon 3 4 Signed into law - RA 10184[5]
5608 Palawan-2nd 1 2 Puerto Princesa and Aborlan to be separated from Palawan-2nd. Signed into law - RA 10171[6]
Potential new districts 16 Approved new districts 5

The number of new legislative districts may also increase the seats allocated for party-list representatives: for every five new legislative districts, one seat for a party-list representative is also created.

Marginal seatsEdit

These are seats where the winning margin was 3% or less, politicians may choose to run under a different political party as compared to 2010. This excludes districts where the nearest losing candidate or that candidate's party is not contesting the election, or districts that were redistricted.

District 2010 Winner Political party on 2010 election day Current
political party
2013 opponent Political party 2010 margin 2013 result
Biliran Rogelio Espina Nacionalista Liberal Glenn Chong PMP 0.45% Liberal hold
Camarines Sur–5th Salvio Fortuno Nacionalista Liberal Emmanuel Alfelor NPC 0.62% Liberal hold
Batanes Dina Abad Liberal Liberal Carlo Oliver Diasnes Independent 1.06% Liberal hold
Mountain Province Maximo Dalog Lakas-Kampi Liberal Jupiter Dominguez UNA 1.54% Liberal hold
Surigao del Norte–2nd Guillermo Romarate, Jr. Lakas-Kampi Liberal Robert Ace Barbers Nacionalista 1.64% Liberal hold
Manila–6th Sandy Ocampo Liberal Liberal Benny M. Abante UNA 1.81% Liberal hold
Zamboanga Sibugay–2nd Romeo Jalosjos, Jr. Nacionalista Nacionalista Dulce Ann Hofer Liberal 1.85% Liberal gain from Nacionalista
Isabela–2nd Ana Cristina Go Nacionalista Nacionalista Edgar Uy Liberal 1.93% Nacionalista hold
Cagayan de Oro–1st Jose Benjamin Benaldo PMP Nacionalista Rolando Uy Liberal 2.03% Liberal gain from Nacionalista
Bataan–1st Herminia Roman Lakas-Kampi Liberal Enrique T. Garcia NUP 2.53% Liberal hold
Northern Samar–2nd Emil Ong Lakas-Kampi NUP Ramp Nielsen Uy Liberal 2.67% NUP hold
Batangas–3rd Nelson Collantes PMP Liberal Victoria Hernandez-Reyes Nacionalista 2.78% Liberal hold
Cotabato–2nd Nancy Catamco Lakas-Kampi Liberal Bernardo Piñol, Jr. Independent 2.88% Redistricted; Liberal hold
Zamboanga del Norte–2nd Rosendo Labadlabad Liberal Liberal Ronald Yebes NUP 2.93% Liberal hold

Retiring and term-limited incumbentsEdit

These are the incumbents who are not running for a seat in the House of Representatives, and are not term limited:

Defeated incumbentsEdit

District Party Incumbent Winner Party Notes
Bacolod Independent Anthony Golez, Jr. Evelio Leonardia NPC Golez is an NPC member running as an independent.
Baguio UNA Bernardo Vergara Nicasio Aliping Independent
Batangas–1st Liberal Tomas Apacible Eileen Ermita-Buhain Lakas Apacible defeated Ermita-Buhain's father Eduardo in the 2010 general election.
Bukidnon–1st NPC Jesus Emmanuel Paras Maria Lourdes Acosta Liberal Paras defeated Acosta's mother Socorro in the 2010 general election.
Cagayan de Oro–1st Nacionalista Jose Benjamin Benaldo Rolando Uy Liberal Benaldo beat Uy's son Rainier in the 2010 general election.
Caloocan–2nd Nacionalista Mitzi Cajayon Edgar Erice Liberal
Cebu–2nd NUP Pablo P. Garcia Wilfredo Caminero Liberal Garcia is one of the deputy speakers.
Iloilo–2nd UNA Augusto Syjuco, Jr. Arcadio Gorriceta Liberal
Laguna–3rd Liberal Maria Evita Alvaro Sol Aragones UNA
Lanao del Sur–1st Independent Hussein Pangandaman Ansaruddin Adiong Liberal
Marinduque NUP Lord Allan Jay Velasco Regina Ongsiako Reyes Liberal Velasco beat Reyes' brother Edmundo in the 2010 general election.
Misamis Occidental–2nd Liberal Loreto Leo Ocampos Henry Oaminal Nacionalista
Northern Samar–1st Liberal Raul Daza Harlin Abayon Nacionalista Daza is one of the deputy speakers. It was the closest House race with a margin of victory of 52 votes.
Pampanga–3rd NPC Aurelio Gonzales, Jr. Oscar Rodriguez Liberal
Sulu–2nd NPC Nur Ana Sahidulla Maryam Arbison Liberal
Tarlac–3rd NUP Jeci Lapus Noel Villanueva Nacionalista
Zambales–2nd Sulong Zambales Jun Omar Ebdane Cheryl Delloso-Montalla Liberal Ebdane beat Delloso-Montalla in the 2012 special election.
Zamboanga Sibugay–2nd Nacionalista Romeo Jalosjos, Jr. Dulce Ann Hofer Liberal Jalosjos defeated Hofer's brother George in the 2010 general election.

Open seat gainsEdit

*Kaka Bag-ao is a party–list representative for Akbayan who ran in Dinagat Islands district under the Liberal Party and won.

ResultsEdit

 
2013 Philippine House district elections chart of votes (inner ring) compared to seats won (outer ring).
District Party-list
112 42 24 18 14 14 29 29
Liberal NPC NUP NP [1] [2] [3] [4]
1 Lakas
2 Other parties and independents
3 Party-lists with 2 or more seats each
4 Party-lists with 1 seat each

District electionsEdit

Only the Liberal Party can win the election outright by placing candidates in a majority of seats. With 292 seats, including seats reserved for sectoral representatives, 147 seats are needed for a majority, and only the Liberal Party is contesting more than 150 seats.

The Liberal Party did win a near majority of the district seats. They are expected to form a coalition with other Team PNoy component parties, other parties, most independents, and most party-list representatives for a large working majority. Lakas-CMD is expected to form the minority bloc anew, while the United Nationalist Alliance and left-leaning representatives may join either bloc.

A total of six independents won, one less than in 2010.

The vote totals below were collected from the results displayed from the COMELEC's "Transparency" server. These are partial and unofficial. The seats won are the ones which had been officially proclaimed by the COMELEC.

e • d Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts
Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Vacant wins Elected %[hd 1] +/−[hd 2]
Liberal (Liberal Party) 10,557,265 38.31%   18.38% 160 93 22 84 9 4 109 37.7%   16
Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 100,405 0.36%   0.36% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Kusug Agusanon (Progressive Agusan) 71,436 0.26%   0.26% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
KKK (Struggle for Peace, Progress and Justice) 54,425 0.20%   0.16% 2 [hd 3] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Akbayan (Akbayan Citizens' Action Party) 34,239 0.12%   0.12% 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0.0%   1
Liberal coalition 10,817,770 39.22%   19.77% 165 95 22 85 9 4 112 38.6%   17
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 4,800,907 17.36%   1.40% 71 40 4 34 6 4 42 14.4%   2
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 3,140,381 9.31%   9.31% 55 11 3 5 6 0 8 2.7%   3
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 281,320 1.02%   0.29% 13 [hd 4] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 144,030 0.52%   1.98% 11 [hd 5] 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 94,966 0.34%   0.14% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Magdiwang (Magdiwang Party) 23,253 0.08%   0.06% 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%   1
1-Cebu (One Cebu) 21,936 0.08%   0.08% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
UNA coalition 3,705,886 11.36%   3.55% 82 12 3 7 6 0 10 3.4%   2
NUP (National Unity Party) 2,402,097 8.69%   8.69% 34 30 0 24 6 0 24 8.2%   6
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 2,364,400 8.55%   2.79% 44 20 5 13 7 0 18 6.2%   2
Lakas (People Power–Christian Muslim Democrats) 1,472,464 5.33%   32.09% 24 18 0 13 5 1 14 4.8%   4
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 97,982 0.35%   0.09% 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Kambilan (Shield and Fellowship of Kapampangans) 96,433 0.35%   0.35% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Unang Sigaw (First Cry of Nueva Ecija–Party of Change) 94,952 0.35%   0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
KBL (New Society Movement) 94,484 0.34%   0.12% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
United Negros Alliance 91,467 0.34%   0.34% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
LDP (Struggle of the Democratic Filipinos) 90,070 0.33%   0.15% 4 1 1 1 0 0 2 0.7%   1
Hugpong sa Tawong Lungsod (Party of the People of the City) 65,324 0.24%   0.24% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 68,281 0.25%   0.25% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3%  
Sulong Zambales (Forward Zambales) 60,280 0.22%   0.22% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0%   1
PPP (Party of Change for Palawan) 57,485 0.21%   0.21% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Hugpong sa Tawong Lungsod (Party of the People of the City) 65,324 0.24%   0.24% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Sulong Zambales (Forward Zambales) 60,280 0.22%   0.22% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0%   1
PPP (Party of Change for Palawan) 57,485 0.21%   0.21% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3%   1
Ang Kapatiran (Alliance for the Common Good) 19,019 0.07%   0.06% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
AZAP (Forward Zamboanga Party) 15,881 0.06%   0.06% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PMM (Workers' and Farmers' Party) 10,396 0.04%   2.59% 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
PLM (Party of the Laboring Masses) 10,196 0.04%   0.04% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Makabayan (Patriotic Coalition of the People) 3,870 0.01%   0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Ompia (Ompia Party) 1,682 0.01%   0.01% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
DPP (Democratic Party of the Philippines) 1,071 0.00%   0.00% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0%  
Independent 1,665,324 6.02%   0.93% 172 4 4 1 3 1 6 2.1%   2
Vacancy 5 0 0 5 0 0.0%   5
Total 27,584,741 100% N/A 628 229 44 180 44 10 234 80.1%   5
Valid votes 27,584,741 About 8.3 million votes are not included as they weren't included in the Transparency server. It is unknown which of those are valid or invalid votes.
Invalid votes 4,148,957
Turnout 40,144,207 75.77%   1.43
Registered voters (without overseas voters) 52,014,648 100%   2.54%
  1. ^ Of all 292 House members, including party-list representatives.
  2. ^ From last composition of the 15th Congress.
  3. ^ All incumbent KKK representatives are co-nominated by the Liberal Party.
  4. ^ All incumbent PDP-Laban representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.
  5. ^ All incumbent PMP representatives are running under the United Nationalist Alliance.

Party-list electionEdit

The Commission on Elections was supposed to release results for the party-list election along with the results for the Senate election; however, the commission suspended the release of results after questions of whether to include votes for the twelve disqualified parties, although not with finality, were to be included or not.[7] Canvassing of results for the party-list election resumed on May 19 after the 12 senators-elect were already proclaimed, with the commission meeting to determine on what to do with the votes of the twelve disqualified parties.[8] On May 22, the commission announced that they will proclaim the winning parties, but not the number of seats.[9]


e • d Summary of the May 13, 2013 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives[10]
Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Swing Up Won +/−
Buhay 1,270,608 4.60%   0.33% 2 3   1
A TEACHER 1,042,863 3.77%   1.66% 2 2  
Bayan Muna 954,724 3.46%   0.90% 2 2  
1-CARE 934,915 3.38%   0.75% 2 2  
Akbayan 829,149 3.00%   0.62% 2 2  
Abono 768,265 2.78%   0.16% 2 2  
AKB 763,316 2.76%   2.44% 3 2   1
OFW Family 752,229 2.72%   2.72% 0 2   2
GABRIELA 715,250 2.59%   0.84% 2 2  
Coop-NATCCO 642,005 2.32%   0.90% 2 2  
AGAP 592,463 2.14%   0.38% 1 2   1
CIBAC 584,906 2.12%   0.11% 2 2  
Magdalo 567,426 2.05%   2.05% 0 2   2
An Waray 541,205 1.96%   0.47% 2 2  
ABAMIN 466,114 1.69%   0.40% 1 1  
ACT Teachers 454,346 1.64%   0.37% 1 1  
Butil 439,557 1.59%   0.14% 1 1  
AMIN 382,267 1.38%   0.83% 0 1   1
ACT-CIS 377,165 1.37%   1.37% 0 1   1
Kalinga 372,383 1.35%   0.56% 1 1  
LPGMA 370,897 1.34%   0.09% 1 1  
TUCP 369,286 1.34%   0.50% 1 1  
YACAP 366,621 1.33%   0.18% 1 1  
AGRI 366,170 1.33%   1.16% 0 1   1
ANGKLA 360,497 1.30%   1.30% 0 1   1
ABS 359,587 1.30%   0.42% 1 1  
DIWA 341,820 1.24%   0.42% 1 1  
Kabataan 341,292 1.24%   0.19% 1 1  
Anakpawis 321,745 1.16%   0.37% 1 1  
Alay Buhay 317,355 1.15%   0.59% 1 1  
AAMBIS-Owa 312,312 1.13%   0.09% 1 1  
1-SAGIP 287,739 1.04%   1.04% 0 1   1
AVE 270,431 0.98%   0.24% 1 1  
ATING Koop 267,763 0.97%   0.37% 1 1  
Abang Lingkod 260,923 0.94%   0.83% 0 1   1
1-BAP 245,529 0.89%   0.89% 0 1   1
ABAKADA 244,754 0.89%   0.56% 0 1   1
AMA 244,026 0.88%   0.67% 0 1   1
Ang Nars 243,360 0.88%   0.88% 0 1   1
ANAC-IP 241,505 0.87%   0.87% 0 1   1
Agbiag! 240,841 0.87%   0.03% 1 1  
Append 236,353 0.86%   0.86% 0 1   1
ALIF 223,857 0.81%   0.03% 1 0   1
Ating Guro 214,080 0.77%   0.77% 0 0  
PBA 212,298 0.77%   0.11% 1 0   1
Aangat Tayo 207,855 0.75%   0.14% 1 0   1
Ang Kasangga 202,456 0.73%   0.28% 1 0   1
BH 190,001 0.69%   0.31% 1 0   1
KAKUSA 175,096 0.63%   0.17% 1 0   1
PISTON 174,976 0.63%   0.63% 0 0  
Bayani 165,906 0.60%   0.34% 0 0  
AKMA-PTM 165,784 0.60%   0.04% 0 0  
ADA 164,702 0.60%   0.50% 0 0  
1-AALALAY 162,552 0.59%   0.59% 0 0  
Abante Retirees 161,915 0.59%   0.59% 0 0  
Katribu 153,844 0.56%   0.17% 0 0  
ALE 153,616 0.56%   0.56% 0 0  
1JAMG 153,072 0.55%   0.25% 0 0  
ABROAD 150,854 0.55%   0.03% 1 0   1
VFP 148,591 0.54%   0.01% 0 0  
APEC 146,392 0.53%   0.54% 1 0   1
Pasang Masda 134,944 0.49%   0.37% 0 0  
1 ang Pamilya 131,954 0.48%   0.26% 1 0   1
AGHAM 130,694 0.47%   0.36% 1 0   1
Ang Prolife 129,989 0.47%   0.47% 0 0  
PACYAW 123,791 0.45%   0.04% 0 0  
1-UTAK 123,489 0.45%   0.30% 1 0   1
1-LAMBAT 119,505 0.43%   0.43% 0 0  
1-PABAHAY 117,516 0.43%   0.43% 0 0  
Akap Bata 116,837 0.42%   0.05% 0 0  
Abante KA 111,625 0.40%   0.31% 0 0  
FIRM 24-K 103,316 0.37%   0.04% 0 0  
ABA 102,021 0.37%   0.10% 0 0  
Ang Ladlad 100,958 0.37%   0.02% 0 0  
AANI 93,581 0.34%   0.14% 0 0  
AA-KASOSYO 88,603 0.32%   0.27% 1 0   1
1BRO-PGBI 87,247 0.32%   0.32% 0 0  
PWD 86,854 0.31%   0.31% 0 0  
Sanlakas 86,145 0.31%   0.31% 0 0  
ATM 81,378 0.29%   0.20% 0 0  
AKO 80,398 0.29%   0.02% 0 0  
ADAM 77,206 0.28%   0.06% 0 0  
ARAL 76,838 0.28%   0.14% 0 0  
KAAKBAY 71,534 0.26%   0.29% 0 0  
ANG MINERO 67,807 0.25%   0.12% 0 0  
ALIM 65,119 0.24%   0.06% 0 0  
AASENSO 65,095 0.24%   0.24% 0 0  
1-AAMOVER 59,844 0.22%   0.22% 0 0  
AMA 58,886 0.21%   0.21% 0 0  
1GANAP/Guardians 58,406 0.21%   0.20% 0 0  
AKO BAHAY 51,806 0.19%   0.01% 0 0  
Migrante 51,431 0.19%   0.19% 0 0  
Alyansa ng OFW 51,069 0.18%   0.13% 0 0  
UMALAB KA 45,492 0.16%   0.16% 0 0  
ARC 45,120 0.16%   0.04% 0 0  
ABP 44,324 0.16%   0.03% 0 0  
A BLESSED 43,829 0.16%   0.05% 0 0  
AAMA 42,853 0.16%   0.01% 0 0  
ADING 42,819 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
ARARO 41,257 0.15%   0.35% 0 0  
UNI-MAD 41,023 0.15%   0.05% 0 0  
AMOR Seaman 40,955 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
MTM PHILS 40,218 0.15%   0.15% 0 0  
AWAT Mindanao 39,206 0.14%   0.01% 0 0  
Green Force 30,581 0.11%   0.04% 0 0  
Agila 29,739 0.11%   0.25% 0 0  
AMS 27,883 0.10%   0.04% 0 0  
Alagad 27,400 0.10%   0.68% 1 0   1
AFPSEGCO 24,369 0.09%   0.04% 0 0  
KLBP 21,900 0.08%   0.09% 0 0  
1-ABILIDAD 19,381 0.07%   0.07% 0 0  
ALLUMAD 7,642 0.03%   0.01% 0 0  
Vacancy 1[p 1]   1
Valid votes 27,630,854 68.83%   8.00% 57 56   1
Senior Citizens 679,168 2.46%   1.96% 1[p 1] 0   1
ANAD 201,050 1 0   1
BINHI 185,987 0 0  
BANTAY 113,989 0 0  
COCOFED 103,626 0 0  
Atong Paglaum 95,490 0 0  
1ST KABAGIS 94,651 0 0  
SMART 84,803 0 0  
KAP 57,152 0 0  
A-IPRA 28,263 0 0  
AG 4,259 1 0   1
Invalid and blank votes 12,513,353 31.17%   8.00%
Total turnout 40,144,207 77.19%   2.85%
Registered voters 52,006,910 100%   1.33%
  1. ^ a b Senior Citizens originally had two representatives. When one of the Senior Citizens representatives resigned, the Commission on Elections refused to elevate the next person on the list as an elected representative after it was revealed to be a part of a term-sharing agreement which the commission prohibited.

DetailsEdit

Region Details Seats won per party Total seats
Lakas Liberal Nacionalista NPC NUP UNA Others & ind.
I Elections
1 / 12
2 / 12
2 / 12
6 / 12
0 / 12
N/A
1 / 12
12 / 292
II Elections N/A
2 / 10
2 / 10
4 / 10
2 / 10
0 / 10
0 / 10
10 / 292
III Elections
1 / 21
8 / 21
2 / 21
3 / 21
4 / 21
0 / 21
3 / 21
21 / 292
IV–A Elections
3 / 23
10 / 23
1 / 23
5 / 23
3 / 23
1 / 23
0 / 23
23 / 292
IV–B Elections
0 / 8
4 / 8
1 / 8
1 / 8
1 / 8
0 / 8
1 / 8
8 / 292
V Elections
4 / 16
6 / 16
1 / 16
3 / 16
2 / 16
0 / 16
0 / 16
16 / 292
VI Elections
0 / 18
10 / 18
0 / 18
3 / 18
2 / 18
1 / 18
2 / 18
18 / 292
VII Elections
1 / 16
8 / 16
1 / 16
4 / 16
1 / 16
1 / 16
0 / 16
16 / 292
VIII Elections
1 / 12
7 / 12
1 / 12
1 / 12
2 / 12
0 / 12
0 / 12
12 / 292
IX Elections N/A
4 / 9
2 / 9
1 / 9
0 / 9
0 / 9
2 / 9
9 / 292
X Elections N/A
6 / 14
2 / 14
4 / 14
0 / 14
0 / 14
2 / 14
14 / 292
XI Elections
1 / 11
6 / 11
2 / 11
0 / 11
2 / 11
N/A
0 / 11
11 / 292
XII Elections N/A
2 / 8
N/A
2 / 8
1 / 8
1 / 8
2 / 8
8 / 292
Caraga Elections
1 / 9
6 / 9
0 / 9
0 / 9
2 / 9
0 / 9
0 / 9
9 / 292
ARMM Elections
0 / 8
7 / 8
0 / 8
0 / 8
1 / 8
0 / 8
0 / 8
8 / 292
CAR Elections N/A
5 / 7
0 / 7
1 / 7
0 / 7
0 / 7
1 / 7
7 / 292
NCR Elections
1 / 32
19 / 32
2 / 32
3 / 32
1 / 32
6 / 32
0 / 32
32 / 292
Party-list Election N/A
2 / 58
N/A N/A N/A N/A
51 / 58
58 / 292
Total
14 / 292
114 / 292
18 / 292
42 / 292
24 / 292
10 / 292
65 / 292
287 / 292

Seat totalsEdit

 
Representation of the seats in the lower house; this is not how the seats are arranged. Unaffiliated local parties are in purple, and party-list representatives are in black.
Party/coalition Seats
District Party-list Totals %
Liberal coalition 112 2 114 39.0%
NPC 43 0 43 14.7%
NUP 24 0 24 8.2%
Nacionalista 17 0 17 5.8%
Lakas 14 0 14 4.8%
UNA coalition 10 0 10 3.4%
Makabayan 0 7 7 2.4%
LDP 2 0 2 0.7%
CDP 1 0 1 0.3%
Kambilan 1 0 1 0.3%
KBL 1 0 1 0.3%
PPP 1 0 1 0.3%
Unang Sigaw 1 0 1 0.3%
United Negros Alliance 1 0 1 0.3%
Other party-list representatives 0 11 49 16.8%
Independent 6 0 6 2.1%
Totals 234 53 248 98.3%

AftermathEdit

 
Same as above, but showing district gains and losses.

Preliminary results states that President Aquino's allies winning an overwhelming majority of seats in the House of Representatives. This makes Aquino the only president enjoy majorities in both houses of Congress since the People Power Revolution of 1986. This is seen as an endorsement of the voters of Aquino's reformist agenda; although several key wins elsewhere by the United Nationalist Alliance and its allies would mean that Aquino's chosen successor may face a significant challenge in the 2016 presidential election.[11]

Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. is seen to keep his speakership position with the Liberals winning at least 100 out of the 234 district seats. Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II said that a great majority of incumbents are poised to successfully defend their seats, and that the Liberal Party are to be the single largest party in the lower house. The Nacionalista Party has at least 15 winning representatives, "a substantial number" of the 40 incumbents Nationalist People's Coalition are to hold their seats, and the 34-member National Unity Party House leader Rodolfo Antonino expects Belmonte to be reelected as speaker. The United Nationalist Alliance won three seats in Metro Manila, and at least 2 more seats outside the metropolis.[12]

Election for the SpeakershipEdit

15th Congress Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. easily won reelection for the speakership. The race for minority leader, usually given to the person finishing second in the speakership race, was narrowly won by Ronaldo Zamora over Ferdinand Martin Romualdez. There was one abstention, from Toby Tiangco, who wanted to be an independent.[13] Belmonte also abstained from voting, while Romaualdez and Zamora voted for themselves; if Belmonte only had one opponent he would've voted for his opponent, and his opponent would've voted for him (as seen in the 15th Congress speakership election). Since there were more than two nominees, the traditional courtesy votes did not push through.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Muga, Felix P. II (May 20, 2013). "How to fill the 58 party-list seats". Rappler.com. Retrieved May 23, 2013.
  2. ^ Doguiles, Danilo (September 18, 2012). "Cotabato Province gets third district". Philippine Information Agency. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  3. ^ Santos, Reynaldo Jr. (July 10, 2012). "QC to have two additional districts". Rappler.com. Retrieved August 11, 2012.
  4. ^ "House Bill 5236 - An Act Reapportioning the Province of Bukidnon into Four (4) Legislative Districts" (PDF). 15th Congress of the Philippines. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 8, 2012. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  5. ^ Porcalla, Delon (October 5, 2012). "4th legislative district created in Bukidnon". Philippine Star. Retrieved October 29, 2012.
  6. ^ "Republic Act 10171 - An Act Reapportioning the Province of Palawan into Three (3) Legislative Districts". The Official Gazette. July 19, 2012. Retrieved September 18, 2012.
  7. ^ Cruz, RG (May 15, 2013). "NBOC suspends canvassing for party-list race". ABS-CBN News. Retrieved May 23, 2013.
  8. ^ Dizon, Nikko (May 20, 2013). "Suspended party-list canvass resumes". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 23, 2013.
  9. ^ "Comelec to proclaim winning party-lists without announcing number of seats obtained". GMA News Online. May 22, 2013. Retrieved May 23, 2013.
  10. ^ "List of Candidates With Votes Obtained for Partylist". COMELEC.gov.ph. June 1, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2015.
  11. ^ "Philippines' Aquino wins rare Congress majority in mid-term polls". Reuters. May 14, 2013. Retrieved May 20, 2013.
  12. ^ "SB likely to keep speaker's post with LP bets' victory". Philippine Star. ABS-CBNnews. May 15, 2013. Retrieved May 20, 2013.
  13. ^ Boncocan, Karen (July 22, 2013). "House re-elects Belmonte in overwhelming vote". INQUIRER.net. Retrieved July 22, 2013.