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List of women's rights activists

This article is a list of notable women's rights activists, arranged alphabetically by modern country names and by the names of the persons listed.

Contents

AlbaniaEdit

ArgentinaEdit

AustraliaEdit

  • Anne Summers (born 1945) – women's rights activist in politics and media, women's advisor to Labor premier Paul Keating, editor of Ms. magazine (NY)
  • Bella Guerin (1858–1923) – first woman to graduate from an Australian university, Guerin was a socialist feminist prominent (although with periods of public dispute) within the Australian Labor Party.
  • Bessie Rischbieth (1874–1967)) – earliest female appointee to any court (honorary, Perth Children's Court, 1915), active against Australian government practice of taking Aboriginal children from their mothers (Stolen Generation
  • Eileen Powell (1913–1997) – trade unionist, women's activist and contributor to the Equal Pay for Equal Work decision
  • Elizabeth Anne Reid (born 1942) – world's first women's affairs adviser to head of government (Gough Whitlam), active in UN and on HIV
  • Elizabeth Evatt (born 1933) – legal reformist, jurist, critic of Australia's Sex Discrimination Act, first Australian in United Nations Commission on Human Rights
  • Eva Cox (born 1938) – sociologist and feminist active in politics and social services, member of Women's Electoral Lobby, social commentator on women in power and at work, and social justice
  • Fiona Patten (born 1964) – leader of Australian Sex Party, lobbyist for personal freedoms and progressive lifestyles
  • Germaine Greer (born 1939) – author of The Female Eunuch, academic and social commentator
  • Jessie Street (1889–1970) – Australian suffragette, feminist and human rights campaigner influential in labour rights and early days of UN
  • Louisa Lawson (1848–1920)) – feminist, suffragist, author, founder of The Dawn, and pro-republican federalist
  • Louisa Margaret Dunkley (1866–1927) – telegraphist and labour organizer
  • Michelle Payne (born 1985) – first female winner of Melbourne Cup and an advocate of increased presence of women in sport
  • Miles Franklin (1879–1954) – writer and feminist
  • Millicent Preston-Stanley (1883–1955) – first female member of New South Wales Legislative Assembly, campaigner for custodial rights of mothers in divorce and for women's health care
  • Rosie Batty (born 1962) – 2015 Australian of the Year and family violence campaigner
  • Sandra Bloodworth – labour historian, socialist activist, co-founder of Trotskyist Socialist Alternative, editor of Marxist Left Review
  • Thelma Bate (1904–1984) – community leader, advocate for inclusion of Aboriginals in Country Women's Association
  • Vida Goldstein (1869–1949) – early Australian feminist campaigning for women's suffrage and social reform, first woman in British Empire to stand for national election
  • Zelda D'Aprano (born 1928) – trade unionist, feminist, in 1969 chained herself to doors of Commonwealth Building over equal pay.
  • Margot Fink (born 1994) – Prominent LGBTIQ activist and nominee for Young Australian of the Year (2016)

AustriaEdit

BelgiumEdit

BotswanaEdit

  • Unity Dow (born 1959) – judge and writer, plaintiff in case allowing children of mixed parentage to be deemed nationals

BulgariaEdit

BrazilEdit

CanadaEdit

Cape VerdeEdit

ChileEdit

ChinaEdit

CroatiaEdit

DenmarkEdit

EgyptEdit

  • Ahlam Mostaghanmi (born 1952) – Arabic writer and sociologist.
  • Engy Ghozlan (born 1985) – coordinator of campaigns against sexual harassment
  • Fatima el Naouut (born 1966) – Egyptian writer and journalist.
  • Hoda Shaarawi (1879–1947) – feminist organizer of Mubarrat Muhammad Ali (women’s social service organization), Union of Educated Egyptian Women, and Wafdist Women’s Central Committee, founder president of Egyptian Feminist Union
  • Houda Darwish (born 1991) – Arabic writer and pediatrician and neonatalogist doctor.
  • Nawal el-Saadawi (born 1931) – writer and doctor, advocate of women’s health and equality
  • Qasim Amin (1863–1908) – jurist, early advocate of women’s rights in society
  • Soraya Bahgat (born 1983) – Egyptian-Finnish women's rights advocate, social entrepreneur and founder of Tahrir Bodyguard

EstoniaEdit

FinlandEdit

FranceEdit

GermanyEdit

GhanaEdit

GreeceEdit

HungaryEdit

IndiaEdit

IndonesiaEdit

  • Raden Adjeng Kartini (1879–1904) – Javanese advocate for native Indonesian women, critic of polygamy and lack of women's education

IranEdit

IrelandEdit

IsraelEdit

ItalyEdit

JapanEdit

LatviaEdit

LebanonEdit

LibyaEdit

  • Alaa Murabit (born 1989) – physician, advocate of inclusive security, peace-building and post-conflict governance

LuxembourgEdit

NetherlandsEdit

NamibiaEdit

New ZealandEdit

  • Kate Sheppard (1848–1934) – suffragette, influential in winning voting rights for women in 1893 (first country and national election in which women have vote)

NigeriaEdit

NorwayEdit

PakistanEdit

PeruEdit

PhilippinesEdit

PolandEdit

PortugalEdit

Puerto RicoEdit

  • Luisa Capetillo (1879–1922) – labor union suffragette jailed for wearing pants in public

RomaniaEdit

RussiaEdit

Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesEdit

SerbiaEdit

SloveniaEdit

  • Alojzija Štebi (1883–1956), suffragist, who saw socialism as a means of equalizing society for both men and women.

SomaliaEdit

  • Ayaan Hirsi Ali (born 1969) – Somali-Dutch feminist and atheist activist, writer and politician

South AfricaEdit

  • Shamima Shaikh (1960–1998) – member of the Muslim Youth Movement of South Africa, exponent of Islamic gender equality

SpainEdit

SwedenEdit

SwitzerlandEdit

TurkeyEdit

United KingdomEdit

Lesley Abdela (1945- ) is a women’s rights campaigner, gender consultant and journalist who has worked for women’s representation in over 40 countries including post-conflict countries: Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Iraq, Afghanistan, Nepal and Aceh. In 1980 she founded the all-Party 300 Group to campaign to get more women into local, national and European politics in the UK. Author of 100s of features in Guardian, Times, Independent and major women’s magazines and the paperback Women with X Appeal: Women Politicians in Britain Today (London: Macdonald Optima 1989).

United StatesEdit

UruguayEdit

ZimbabweEdit

ImagesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Richard J. Evans: The feminist movement in Germany. London, Beverly Hills 1976 (SAGE Studies in 20th Century History, Vol. 6). ISBN 0-8039-9951-8, S. 120
  2. ^ Prah, Mansah (2002). "Jiagge, Annie (1918–1996)". In Commire, Anne. Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia. Waterford, Connecticut: Yorkin Publications. ISBN 0-7876-4074-3. (Subscription required (help)). 
  3. ^ http://www.deccanherald.com/content/393915/jampk-witnesses-steady-increase-crimes.html
  4. ^ a b Lane, Temryss MacLean (January 15, 2018). "The frontline of refusal: indigenous women warriors of standing rock". International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education. Routledge. 31 (3): 209. doi:10.1080/09518398.2017.1401151. eISSN 1366-5898. ISSN 0951-8398. Her courage in sharing her personal story of sexual violence with congress was vital in the passing of the 2013 Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). [...] Her dignified poise and presence was pivotal and necessary to pass the tribal provisions that protect Native women and their communities in the VAWA. 
  5. ^ Nichols, John (May 24, 2016). "The Democratic Platform Committee Now Has a Progressive Majority. Thanks, Bernie Sanders". Democrats. The Nation. Katrina vanden Heuvel. ISSN 0027-8378. Archived from the original on June 3, 2018. Retrieved June 3, 2018. The Sanders selections are all noted progressives: [...] Native American activist and former Tulalip Tribes Vice Chair Deborah Parker (a key advocate for reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act) [...]. 
  6. ^ Parker, Jacqueline (1974). Helen Valeska Bary: Labor Administration and Social Security: A Woman's Life. Berkeley CA: University of California. 
  7. ^ Santiago-Valles, Kelvin A. (1994). Subject People and Colonial Discourses: Economic Transformation and Social Disorder in Puerto Rico, 1898–1947. SUNY Press. pp. 58, 161. ISBN 9781438418650. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  8. ^ "Fox, Muriel, 1928- . Papers of NOW officer Muriel Fox, 1966-1971: A Finding Aid". Oasis.lib.harvard.edu. 1928-02-03. Retrieved 2018-02-21. 
  9. ^ [1], additional text.