Elizabeth Olsen

Elizabeth Chase Olsen (born February 16, 1989) is an American actress. Born in Sherman Oaks, California, Olsen began acting at age four. She starred in her debut film role in the thriller Martha Marcy May Marlene in 2011, for which she was acclaimed and nominated for a Critics' Choice Movie Award among other accolades, followed by a role in the horror film Silent House. Olsen received a BAFTA Rising Star Award nomination and graduated from New York University two years later.

Elizabeth Olsen
A photograph of Olsen speaking at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con International
Olsen at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con
Born
Elizabeth Chase Olsen

(1989-02-16) February 16, 1989 (age 33)
Alma materNew York University
OccupationActress
Years active1994–present
SpouseRobbie Arnett
Relatives

Olsen gained worldwide recognition for her portrayal of Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch in the Marvel Cinematic Universe media franchise, starring in the superhero films Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), Captain America: Civil War (2016), Avengers: Infinity War (2018), Avengers: Endgame (2019), and Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022), as well as the miniseries WandaVision (2021). Her performance in WandaVision garnered her nominations for a Primetime Emmy Award and a Golden Globe Award.

Outside of her work with Marvel, Olsen appeared in the monster film Godzilla (2014), the mystery film Wind River (2017), and the dramedy Ingrid Goes West (2017). She executive produced and starred in the drama series Sorry for Your Loss (2018–2019), earning a Critics' Choice Television Award nomination for her role as a widow.

Early life and educationEdit

Elizabeth Chase Olsen[1] was born on February 16, 1989, in Sherman Oaks, California.[2][3] Her mother, Jarnie, is a former dancer, while her father, Dave, is a real estate agent.[4][5] She is the younger sister of twin fashion designers Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, who became successful television and film actresses as children. Olsen also has an older brother, a younger half-brother, and a younger half-sister.[5] Her parents divorced in 1996.[6]

Olsen began acting when she was four years old,[7] appearing in Mary-Kate and Ashley's projects, including the 1994 television film How the West Was Fun and the straight-to-video series The Adventures of Mary-Kate & Ashley.[8][9][10] As a child, she took acting classes and spent time at musical theatre camp.[8] Olsen nearly quit pursuing acting in 2004 due to the media attention toward Mary-Kate's eating disorder.[11] She went to Campbell Hall School in Studio City, California.[12] Olsen attended New York University (NYU)'s Tisch School of the Arts, during which she took classes at Atlantic Theater Company and spent a semester at the Moscow Art Theatre School in Russia.[5] She attained understudy roles in the 2008 off-Broadway production of the play Dust and the 2009 Broadway production of the play Impressionism, which led to her securing an agent.[5][8] Olsen graduated from NYU in January 2013.[13]

CareerEdit

Early roles and acclaim (2011–2014)Edit

 
Olsen at the 2013 San Diego Comic-Con

Olsen made her film debut in the 2011 thriller film Martha Marcy May Marlene.[14] The film, along with her performance, received critical acclaim following its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.[15][16] Olsen earned several award nominations for her portrayal of the titular Martha, a young woman suffering from delusions after fleeing her life in a cult and returning to her family,[15][17] including those for the Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress and the Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead.[16] She attributed her interest in the character to her own fascination with mental illnesses.[14] Olsen next appeared in the horror film Silent House, which garnered her "rave reviews".[18] Despite premiering at the Sundance Film Festival alongside Martha Marcy May Marlene, it was released in 2012,[19] during which she also starred in the thriller Red Lights and the comedy Liberal Arts.[20]

In January 2013, Olsen garnered a nomination for the BAFTA Rising Star Award at the 66th British Academy Film Awards.[21] She played Edie Parker, novelist Jack Kerouac's first wife and the author of the Beat Generation memoir You'll Be Okay, in the biographical drama Kill Your Darlings.[22] She appeared in the American remake of the 2003 South Korean film Oldboy, playing Marie Sebastian, a nurse who helps the protagonist, played by Josh Brolin, find his daughter.[23] That same year, she starred as the titular Juliet in an off-Broadway production of the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. The New York Times critic Ben Brantley described her portrayal as "alternating between saucy petulance and hysteria".[24] She played the leading role in In Secret, a film adaptation of Émile Zola's 1867 novel Thérèse Raquin. The film was released in February 2014.[25] Later that year, Olsen starred in the monster film Godzilla, opposite Bryan Cranston and Aaron Taylor-Johnson, which received positive reviews and grossed $529 million against a $160 million production budget.[26][27] She and Dakota Fanning co-starred as teenage girls in Brooklyn in the film Very Good Girls, released that same year,[28] which Josh Duboff of Vanity Fair characterized as unfavorably reviewed.[29]

Marvel Cinematic Universe and continued success (2015–present)Edit

Olsen starred in the 2015 superhero film Avengers: Age of Ultron, a sequel to The Avengers,[30] joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe media franchise.[31][32] In the film, she portrayed Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch, which marked the comic book character's film debut.[33] She first appeared as the character in a post-credits scene of the 2014 film Captain America: The Winter Soldier, alongside Aaron Taylor-Johnson, who portrayed Maximoff's brother, Pietro.[31][34] Olsen played the part with an accent originating from a fictional country called Sokovia, which she described as similar to Slovakian.[32] She reprised the role in Captain America: Civil War (2016),[35] Avengers: Infinity War (2018),[36] and Avengers: Endgame (2019),[37] the last of which became the second highest-grossing film of all time.[38] With the role, Olsen rose to fame.[39][40]

Olsen portrayed Audrey Williams, the wife, manager, and duet partner of singer Hank Williams, portrayed by Tom Hiddleston, in the 2015 biographical film I Saw the Light, directed by Marc Abraham.[41] In 2017, she starred as a novice FBI agent in the mystery film Wind River and a social media influencer in the comedy-drama film Ingrid Goes West, both of which were released in August to critical praise.[42][43][44] Vulture's David Edelstein found Olsen's "incongruously high-schoolish demeanor" in Wind River problematic,[45] while Peter Travers of Rolling Stone wrote that she gave a "major eye-opener of a performance" in Ingrid Goes West, deeming it "toxic perfection".[46] The following year, she appeared in the Netflix film Kodachrome, playing a caregiver to a photographer, played by Ed Harris.[47] Olsen executive produced and starred as a young widow named Leigh Shaw in the Facebook Watch web television series Sorry for Your Loss, which premiered in September 2018.[48] She said the three years it took to develop the series enabled her to immerse herself in Shaw's impulses.[49] Critics reviewed the series positively,[50] and Olsen's performance, which earned her a nomination for the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Actress in a Drama Series,[51] was noted as "stunning",[52] "disciplined and sharp",[53] as well as "slyly sympathetic".[54] The series was canceled in January 2020 after two seasons.[55]

Alongside Paul Bettany as Vision, Olsen played Maximoff again in the superhero miniseries WandaVision, which premiered on Disney+ in January 2021.[56] In addition to complimenting Olsen and Bettany's chemistry, critics praised the cast,[57] with Vox's Alex Abad-Santos writing Olsen was brilliant in her portrayal and Linda Holmes of NPR highlighting her "indelible central performance" in their respective reviews.[58][59] Olsen earned a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited or Anthology Series or Movie and Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film for her performance.[60][61] She reprised the role in the film Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, which was released in May 2022 to mixed reviews. Olsen's performance received praise, with Owen Gleiberman of Variety writing that it "generates an operatic fire".[62][63]

Olsen is set to star as housewife Candy Montgomery in Love and Death, an HBO Max limited series about a 1980 murder in Texas.[64]

Personal lifeEdit

Olsen says she became an atheist at the age of 13 because she believes "religion should be about community and having a place to go in prayer, not something that should determine women's freedoms."[65] She formerly held a real estate license in New York, which she obtained after first moving there.[66] Olsen is an ambassador for the company Bobbi Brown Cosmetics.[50] She and actor Boyd Holbrook were in a relationship from 2011 to 2014.[67]

Olsen became engaged to musician Robbie Arnett, of the American band Milo Greene, in July 2019 after three years of dating.[68][69] The two secretly married before the COVID-19 pandemic, having eloped.[70] She and Arnett live in Los Angeles.[71] They co-wrote a children's book, titled Hattie Harmony: Worry Detective, which released in June 2022.[72]

FilmographyEdit

Key
  Denotes productions that have not yet been released

FilmEdit

Year Title Role Notes Ref.
2011 Martha Marcy May Marlene Martha / Marcy May / Marlene Lewis [16]
2012 Red Lights Sally Owen [20]
Silent House Sarah [19]
Peace, Love & Misunderstanding Zoe [8]
Liberal Arts Zibby [20]
2013 Kill Your Darlings Edie Parker [22]
Oldboy Marie Sebastian / Mia Doucett [23]
2014 In Secret Thérèse Raquin [25]
Captain America: The Winter Soldier Wanda Maximoff Uncredited; post-credits scene [34]
Very Good Girls Gerry Fields [28]
Godzilla Elle Brody [26]
2015 Avengers: Age of Ultron Wanda Maximoff [30]
I Saw the Light Audrey Williams [41]
2016 Captain America: Civil War Wanda Maximoff [35]
2017 Ingrid Goes West Taylor Sloane [42]
Wind River Jane Banner [42]
2018 Kodachrome Zooey Kern [47]
Avengers: Infinity War Wanda Maximoff [36]
2019 Avengers: Endgame Wanda Maximoff [37]
2022 Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch [62]

TelevisionEdit

Year Title Role Notes Ref.
1994 How the West Was Fun Girl in Car Television film [9]
2016 Drunk History Norma Kopp Episode: "Siblings" [73]
2017 HarmonQuest Stirrip Episode: "The Keystone Obelisk" [74]
2018–2019 Sorry for Your Loss Leigh Shaw Main role; also executive producer [50]
2021 WandaVision Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch Main role; 9 episodes [56]
2021–2022 Marvel Studios: Assembled Herself 2 episodes [75][76]
2022 Saturday Night Live Herself Episode: "Benedict Cumberbatch/Arcade Fire" [77]
2023 Love and Death   Candy Montgomery Miniseries [64]
What If...? Wanda Maximoff / Scarlet Witch Voice [78]

TheatreEdit

Year Title Role Venue Ref.
2013 Romeo and Juliet Juliet Classic Stage Company [24]

Awards and nominationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit