Biju Janata Dal

The Biju Janata Dal (transl.Biju Janata Dal; abbr. BJD) is a regional political party in the Indian state of Odisha founded and led by Naveen Patnaik, the current Chief Minister of Odisha and the son of former Chief Minister of Odisha Biju Patnaik, after whom the party is named. It was founded on 26 December 1997.[7]

Biju Janata Dal
AbbreviationBJD
PresidentNaveen Patnaik
Lok Sabha leaderPinaki Misra
Rajya Sabha leaderPrasanna Acharya
FounderNaveen Patnaik[1][2]
Founded26 December 1997 (23 years ago) (1997-12-26)
Split fromJanata Dal
Headquarters6R/3, Unit-6, Forest Park, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
Student wingBiju Chhatra Janata Dal
Youth wingBiju Yuva Janata Dal
Women's wingBiju Mahila Janata Dal
Labour wingBiju Shramik Samukhya
Peasant's wingBiju Krushak Janata Dal
IdeologyRegionalism[3]
Populism[4]
Secularism[3][4]
Liberalism[4][5]
Political positionCentre to centre-left[4]
Colours Deep green
ECI StatusState Party[6]
AllianceNational Democratic Alliance (1998-2009)
Seats in Lok Sabha
12 / 543
Seats in Rajya Sabha
9 / 245
Seats in Odisha Legislative Assembly
114 / 147
Election symbol
Indian Election Symbol Conch.svg
Website
www.bjdodisha.org.in

Electoral recordEdit

BJD won nine seats in the 1998 general election and Naveen was named the Minister for Mines. In the 1999 general elections, BJD won 10 seats. The party won a majority of seats in the state legislative assembly in the 2000 and 2004 elections in alliance with BJP. The party won 11 Lok Sabha seats in the 2004 elections. In the aftermath of Kandhamal Riots, in the 2009 general election the BJD parted ways with the BJP for both the Lok Sabha and Assembly citing communalism and differences in seat sharing. In the 2009 Indian general election, BJD won 14 seats and secured strong 108 legislative seats out of 147 seats in assembly election of 2009. Biju Janata Dal won a huge victory in the 2014 general election securing 20 of the 21 Lok Sabha seats and 117 of 147 Odisha Legislative Assembly seats.[8] They were re-elected to power in Odisha in 2019, winning 112 of the 147 seats in the Odisha state assembly; however, their seats in the Lok Sabha reduced to 12.[9][10]

Policies and ideologyEdit

BJD claims to be inspired by the philosophy of Biju Patnaik with strict adherence towards Secularism, Social Democracy, Social Equality and Social Justice. It does not claim any political ideology but if one goes through its policies, then the party sides with centre-left vision with Welfarism being a bigger chunk of the party's identity. Being a regional party, development of Odisha is its prime goal. The party has been in consistent opposition to the Indian National Congress (INC) which ruled the state for decades.[3][11][12]

RuleEdit

Naveen Patnaik stepped down as Minister of Mines and left the Lok Sabha after the BJD-BJP victory in the Legislative Assembly Elections in 2000 and became the Chief Minister of Odisha. Naveen Patnaik won second, third, fourth, and fifth terms as Chief Minister of Odisha in 2004, 2009, 2014, and 2019 state elections respectively.

LeadershipEdit

The highest decision-making body of the party is its Core Committee.

Electoral PerformancesEdit

Lok Sabha (Lower House)Edit

Lok Sabha Term Indian
General Election
Seats
contested
Seats
won
votes % of votes State (seats)
12th Lok Sabha 1998 12 9 3669825 1.0% Odisha (12)
13th Lok Sabha 1999 12 10 4378536 1.2% Odisha (12)
14th Lok Sabha 2004 12 11 5082849 1.3% Odisha (12)
15th Lok Sabha 2009 18 14 6612552 1.6% Odisha (18)
16th Lok Sabha 2014 21 20 9491497 1.7% Odisha (21)
17th Lok Sabha 2019 21 12 10172041 1.7% Odisha (21)

Odisha Vidhan Sabha (Lower House)Edit

Vidhan Sabha Term UP
elections
Seats
contested
Seats
won
% of
votes
Party Votes
12th Vidhan Sabha 2000 84 68 29.4% 4151895
13th Vidhan Sabha 2004 84 61 27.4% 4632280
14th Vidhan Sabha 2009 129 103 38.9% 6903641
15th Vidhan Sabha 2014 147 117 43.9% 9334852
16th Vidhan Sabha 2019 146 112 45.2% 10470941

List of Chief MinistersEdit

No Name Constituency Portrait Term of office Party[a] Days in office
1 Naveen Patnaik Hinjili   5 March 2000 16 May 2004 Biju Janata Dal 7863 days
(21 years, 193 days)
16 May 2004 21 May 2009
21 May 2009 21 May 2014
21 May 2014 29 May 2019
29 May 2019 Incumbent

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ This column only names the chief minister's party. The state government he heads may be a complex coalition of several parties and independents; these are not listed here.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kaminsky, A.P.; Long, R.D. (2011). India Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Republic. India Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Republic. ABC-CLIO. p. 97. ISBN 978-0-313-37462-3. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  2. ^ Frontline. S. Rangarajan for Kasturi & Sons. 1998. p. 35. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "Biju Janata Dal". Encyclopædia Britannica.
  4. ^ a b c d "Biju Janata Dal (BJD)". elections.in.
  5. ^ "Lok Sabha Elections 2014: Know your party symbols!". Daily News and Analysis. 10 April 2014. Founded in December 1997, the Biju Janata Dal or the BJD is a regional political party of India. Having split from the larger faction Janata Dal, the party stands by democracy and liberalism.
  6. ^ "List of Political Parties and Election Symbols main Notification Dated 18.01.2013" (PDF). India: Election Commission of India. 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2013.
  7. ^ "Biju village protects Patnaik legacy, stands firmly behind BJD - Bhubaneswar News". The Times of India. 16 April 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  8. ^ "Naveen Patnaik: Defying Modi wave, Odisha's 'Mr Clean' wins 5th straight term". Moneycontrol. 23 May 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  9. ^ May 24, TNN /; 2019; Ist, 20:54. "Odisha Election Results 2019: BJD wins 112 assembly seats, BJP settles at 23 | Bhubaneswar News - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 23 June 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  10. ^ "Odisha Lok Sabha Election Results 2019". NDTV.com.
  11. ^ PTI (17 May 2019). "We will not adopt the equal distance policy any more, says BJD's SN Patro". @businessline. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  12. ^ Dal, Biju Janata (26 December 1997). "Manifesto". BJD:: Biju Janata Dal. Retrieved 6 September 2019.

External linksEdit