The 710s decade ran from January 1, 710, to December 31, 719.

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

710

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • The Byzantine outpost of Cherson (Crimea) rebels (with Khazar assistance) against Emperor Justinian II. He sends a fleet under the patrikios Stephen, which retakes the city and restores Byzantine control. The fleet, however, is struck by a storm on its way back and loses many ships, while the Chersonites, again with the aid of the Khazars, rebel anew.[1]
  • The Byzantine general Leo (future emperor Leo III) recovers the Abkhazia (Caucasus) for the Byzantine Empire, from the Arabs.[2]
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

711

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit
MesoamericaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
  • Reconstruction of the Hōryū-ji Temple in Japan is completed (approximate date).

712

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

LiteratureEdit
  • The Kojiki (Record of Ancient Times), a history of Japan, is completed.

713

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
BritainEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit
  • Emperor Xuan Zong liquidates the highly lucrative "Inexhaustible Treasury", which is run by a prominent Buddhist monastery in Chang'an. This monastery collects vast amounts of money, silk, and treasures through multitudes of rich people's repentances, left on the premises anonymously. Although the monastery is generous in donations, Xuan Zong issues a decree abolishing their treasury, on the grounds that their banking practices were fraudulent, collects their riches, and distributes the wealth to various other Buddhist monasteries, Daoist abbeys, and to repair statues, halls, and bridges in the city.
  • In Chang'an, for the annual Lantern Festival of this year, recently abdicated emperor Rui Zong erects an enormous lantern wheel at a city gate, with a recorded height of 200 ft. The frame is draped in brocades and silk gauze, adorned with gold and jade jewelry, and when its total of some 50,000 oil cups is lit, the radiance of it can be seen for miles.
  • Xuan Zong allots the money of 20 million copper coins, and assigns about 1,000 craftsmen to construct a hall at a Buddhist monastery with tons of painted portraits of himself, and of deities, ghosts, etc.
  • Xuan Zong wins a power struggle with his sister, Princess Taiping. He executes a large number of her allies and forces her to commit suicide.

By topicEdit

LiteratureEdit
ReligionEdit

714

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

715

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
 
Dirham of the Umayyad caliph Sulayman (r. 715–717)
JapanEdit
  • Empress Genmei abdicates the throne after an 8-year reign, in which she has built a replica of the Chinese imperial palace at Japan's new capital, Nara. Genmei is succeeded by her daughter Genshō.

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

716

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit

EuropeEdit
BritainEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

717

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
Western EuropeEdit

Arabian EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

718

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
Western EuropeEdit

BritainEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

719

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

710

711

712

713

714

715

716

717

718

719

DeathsEdit

710

711

712

713

714

715

716

717

718

719

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. p. 341. ISBN 978-0-8047-2630-6.
  2. ^ Venning, Timothy, ed. (2006). A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 192. ISBN 978-1-4039-1774-4.
  3. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  4. ^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, pp 42–43
  5. ^ According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  6. ^ Alexander Berzin, Part I: The Umayyad Caliphate (661–750 CE), "The First Muslim Incursion into the Indian Subcontinent". The Historical Interaction between the Buddhist and Islamic Cultures before the Mongol Empire Last accessed. September 11, 2007.
  7. ^ Wink (2004), pp 201–205
  8. ^ Lombard (people), Encyclopædia Britannica
  9. ^ Spencer C. Tucker (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle (p. 208). ISBN 978-1-85109-667-1
  10. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  11. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  12. ^ "Geschiedenis van het volk der Friezen". Boudicca.de. Archived from the original on June 8, 2009. Retrieved 2009-01-22.
  13. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 21). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  14. ^ Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. Gregory II" . Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  15. ^ Dobie, p. 255
  16. ^ Fine, John V. A. Jr. (1991) [1983]. The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. p. 75. ISBN 0-472-08149-7.
  17. ^ Bede, p. 324, translated by Leo Sherley-Price
  18. ^ Gibb, H. A. R.; Kramers, J. H.; Lévi-Provençal, E.; Schacht, J.; Lewis, B. & Pellat, Ch., eds. (1960). The Encyclopaedia of Islam, New Edition, Volume I: A–B. Leiden: E. J. Brill. p. 58. OCLC 495469456.
  19. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  20. ^ Book of Tang, Vol. 194-I
  21. ^ Kaegi (1994), pp. 186, 195
  22. ^ Bellinger & Grierson (1992), p. 5
  23. ^ Jenkins, Romilly (1966). Byzantium: The Imperial centuries AD 610–1071, p. 56
  24. ^ John Cairns, "Road to Manzikert" (2012). Byzantine Warfare in an Age of Crisis and Recovery (Chapter 3), p. 69. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  25. ^ Ambraseys, N. (2009). Earthquakes in the Mediterranean and Middle East: A Multidisciplinary Study of Seismicity up to 1900 (First ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 225. ISBN 978-0521872928.
  26. ^ John Cairns, "Road to Manzikert" (2012). Byzantine Warfare in an Age of Crisis and Recovery (Chapter 3), p. 70. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  27. ^ Guilland, Rodolphe (1959). "L'Expedition de Maslama contre Constantinople (717–718)". Études byzantines (in French). Paris: Publications de la Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines de Paris: 122. OCLC 603552986.
  28. ^ Mango, Cyril; Scott, Roger (1997). The Chronicle of Theophanes Confessor. Byzantine and Near Eastern History, AD 284–813. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 546. ISBN 0-19-822568-7.
  29. ^ Lilie, Ralph-Johannes (1976). Die byzantinische Reaktion auf die Ausbreitung der Araber. Studien zur Strukturwandlung des byzantinischen Staates im 7. und 8. Jhd (in German). Munich: Institut für Byzantinistik und Neugriechische Philologie der Universität München. pp. 130–131.
  30. ^ Treadgold, Warren (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. p. 348. ISBN 0-8047-2630-2.
  31. ^ Treadgold, Warren (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp. 347–349. ISBN 0-8047-2630-2.
  32. ^ Haldon, John F. (1990). Byzantium in the Seventh Century: The Transformation of a Culture. Revised Edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-521-31917-1.
  33. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  34. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  35. ^ Halbertsma, Herrius (1982). "Summary". Frieslands Oudheid (PDF) (Thesis) (in Dutch). Groningen: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. pp. 791–798. OCLC 746889526. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 1, 2013. Retrieved April 17, 2010.