List of shoguns

  (Redirected from List of shōguns)

This article is a list of shoguns that ruled Japan intermittently, as hereditary military commanders,[1] from the establishment of the Asuka period in 709 until the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in 1868.

Asuka period / Heian period (709–1184)Edit

Note: there are different shogun titles. For example Kose no Maro had the title of Mutsu Chintō Shōgun (陸奥鎮東将軍, lit. "Great General of Subduing Mutsu"). Ki no Kosami had the title of Seitō Taishōgun (征東大将軍, lit. "Commander-in-chief for the pacification of the East") [2] in 789 which is less important than Sei-i Taishōgun. Ōtomo no Otomaro was the first person who was granted the title of Seii Taishōgun (征夷大将軍, lit. "Great appeasing general of the barbarians").

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Shogun from Shogun until
1   Kose no Maro
709 709
2   Tajinohi no Agatamori
720 721
3   Ōtomo no Yakamochi
(c. 718–785)
784 785
4   Ki no Kosami
788 789
5   Ōtomo no Otomaro
(731–809)
793 794
6   Sakanoue no Tamuramaro
(758–811)
797 808
7   Funya no Watamaro
(765–823)
811 816
8   Fujiwara no Tadabumi
(873–947)
940 940
9   Minamoto no Yoshinaka
(1154–1184)
1184 1184

Kamakura shogunate (1192–1333)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Shogun from Shogun until
1   Minamoto no Yoritomo
(1147–1199)
1192 1199
2   Minamoto no Yoriie
(1182–1204)
1202 1203
3   Minamoto no Sanetomo
(1192–1219)
1203 1219
4   Kujō Yoritsune
(1218–1256)
1226 1244
5   Kujō Yoritsugu
(1239–1256)
1244 1252
6   Prince Munetaka
(1242–1274)
1252 1266
7   Prince Koreyasu
(1264–1326)
1266 1289
8   Prince Hisaaki
(1276–1328)
1289 1308
9   Prince Morikuni
(1301–1333)
1308 1333

Kenmu Restoration (1333–1336)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Shogun from Shogun until
1   Prince Moriyoshi
(1308–1335)
1333 1333
2   Prince Narinaga
(1326 – c. 1337–44)
1335 1336

Ashikaga shogunate (1336–1573)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Shogun from Shogun until
1   Ashikaga Takauji
(1305–1358)
1338 1358
2   Ashikaga Yoshiakira
(1330–1367)
1359 1367
3   Ashikaga Yoshimitsu
(1358–1408)
1369 de jure
1395
de facto
1408
4   Ashikaga Yoshimochi
(1386–1428)
1395 de jure
1423
de facto
1428
5   Ashikaga Yoshikazu
(1407–1425)
1423 1425
6   Ashikaga Yoshinori
(1394–1441)
1429 1441
7   Ashikaga Yoshikatsu
(1434–1443)
1442 1443
8   Ashikaga Yoshimasa
(1436–1490)
1449 de jure
1474
de facto
1490
9   Ashikaga Yoshihisa
(1465–1489)
1474 1489
10   Ashikaga Yoshitane
(1466–1523)
1490 1493
11   Ashikaga Yoshizumi
(1481–1511)
1495 1508
12   Ashikaga Yoshitane
(1466–1523)
1508 1522
13   Ashikaga Yoshiharu
(1511–1550)
1522 de jure
1547
de facto
1550
14   Ashikaga Yoshiteru
(1536–1565)
1547 1565
15   Ashikaga Yoshihide
(1538–1568)
1568 1568
16   Ashikaga Yoshiaki
(1537–1597)
1568 deposed
1573
abdicated
1588

Azuchi–Momoyama period (1568–1600)Edit

The following were military dictators of Japan, de facto shoguns[citation needed] from 1568 to 1598. They unified the country, which at the start were a chaotic patchwork of warring clans.

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
de facto
shogun from
de facto
shogun until
1   Oda Nobunaga
(1535–1582)
1568 de jure
1575
de facto
1582
2   Oda Nobutada
(1557–1582)
1575 1582
3   Oda Hidenobu
(1580–1605)
1582 1583
1   Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(1537–1598)
1585 de jure
1592
de facto
1598
2   Toyotomi Hidetsugu
(1568–1595)
1592 1595
3   Toyotomi Hideyori
(1593–1615)
1598 de jure
1603

From 1598 to 1600, the de facto shogunate was delegated to the Council of Five Elders.

Tokugawa shogunate (1600–1868)Edit

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Shogun from Shogun until
1   Tokugawa Ieyasu
(1543–1616)
de facto
1600

de jure
1603
de jure
1605
de facto
1616
2   Tokugawa Hidetada
(1579–1632)
1605 de jure
1623
de facto
1632
3   Tokugawa Iemitsu
(1604–1651)
1623 1651
4   Tokugawa Ietsuna
(1641–1680)
1651 1680
5   Tokugawa Tsunayoshi
(1646–1709)
1680 1709
6   Tokugawa Ienobu
(1662–1712)
1709 1712
7   Tokugawa Ietsugu
(1709–1716)
1713 1716
8   Tokugawa Yoshimune
(1684–1751)
1716 de jure
1745
de facto
1751
9   Tokugawa Ieshige
(1712–1761)
1745 de jure
1760
de facto
1761
10   Tokugawa Ieharu
(1737–1786)
1760 1786
11   Tokugawa Ienari
(1773–1841)
1787 de jure
1837
de facto
1841
12   Tokugawa Ieyoshi
(1793–1853)
1837 1853
13   Tokugawa Iesada
(1824–1858)
1853 1858
14   Tokugawa Iemochi
(1846–1866)
1858 1866
15   Tokugawa Yoshinobu
(1837–1913)
1867 1868

Post-bakufu heads of the Tokugawa clan (1868–present)Edit

In 1882, the head of the Tokugawa clan was given the title of Prince (kōshaku) under the kazoku peerage system and permitted to sit in the House of Peers of the Imperial Diet. Two of them served as President of that body.

No. Portrait Name
(birth–death)
Head from Head until
1   Tokugawa Iesato
(1863–1940)[a]
1868 1940
2   Tokugawa Iemasa
(1884–1963)[b]
1940 1963
3   Tokugawa Tsunenari
(born 1940)
1963 Incumbent

Supreme Commanders for the Allied PowersEdit

The Supreme Commanders were informally known as Gaijin Shōgun (外人将軍) during their tenure.[3]

No. Portrait Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers Took office Left office Time in office Defence branch President of the United States
1MacArthur, DouglasGeneral
Douglas MacArthur
(1880–1964)
15 August 1945[c]11 April 1951[d]5 years, 239 days  United States ArmyHarry S. Truman
2Ridgway, MatthewGeneral
Matthew Ridgway
(1895–1993)
11 April 195112 May 1952[e]1 year, 31 days  United States ArmyHarry S. Truman

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Served as President of the House of Peers from 1903 to 1933.
  2. ^ Served as President of the House of Peers from 1946 to 1947.
  3. ^ Assumed command following the surrender of Japan.
  4. ^ Relieved of command by President Truman.
  5. ^ Served until the Treaty of San Francisco came into effect.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Britannica – Shogunate
  2. ^ Friday, 2007:108.
  3. ^ Valley, David J. (April 15, 2000). Gaijin Shogun : Gen. Douglas MacArthur Stepfather of Postwar Japan. Title: Sektor Company. ISBN 978-0967817521. Retrieved 2 June 2017.

BibliographyEdit

  • Friday, Karl (2007). The First Samurai: The Life and Legend of the Warrior Rebel, Taira Masakado. John Wiley and Sons. ISBN 0-471-76082-X.