2020 FIFA Futsal World Cup qualification (UEFA)

2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup qualification (UEFA)
Tournament details
Dates29 January 2019 – 9 December 2020[1]
Teams48 (from 1 confederation)
Tournament statistics
Matches played124
Goals scored752 (6.06 per match)
Top scorer(s)Kazakhstan Douglas Júnior
Bosnia and Herzegovina Anel Radmilović
Netherlands Mats Velseboer
(8 goals each)
2016
2024

The European qualifying competition for the 2020 FIFA Futsal World Cup was a men's futsal competition that determined the six UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts Lithuania in the 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup (originally 2020 but postponed due to COVID-19 pandemic).[2][3][4]

Apart from Lithuania, a record 48 of the remaining 54 UEFA nations entered the competition, including World Cup qualifying debutants Germany, Kosovo, Scotland, and Northern Ireland who entered their first international men's futsal competition.

FormatEdit

The qualifying competition consists of four rounds:[5]

  • Preliminary round: The lowest-ranked 32 teams play in the preliminary round, and are drawn into eight groups of four teams. The winners and runners-up of each group advance to the main round to join the 16 highest-ranked teams which receive byes to the main round.
  • Main round: The 32 teams are drawn into eight groups of four. The winners and runners-up of each group advance to the elite round.
  • Elite round: The 16 teams are drawn into four groups of four. The winners of each group qualify directly for the World Cup, while the runners-up advance to the play-offs.
  • Play-offs: The four teams are drawn into two ties to play home-and-away two-legged matches to determine the last two European qualified teams.

In the preliminary round, main round and elite round, each group is played as a round-robin mini-tournament at the pre-selected hosts.

TiebreakersEdit

In the preliminary round, main round and elite round, teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 13.01 and 13.02):[5]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams have the same number of points, and they met in the last round of the group and are tied after applying all criteria above (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage);
  8. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. UEFA coefficient;
  10. Drawing of lots.

In the play-offs, the team that scores more goals on aggregate over the two legs qualifies for the final tournament. If the aggregate score is level, the away goals rule is applied, i.e., the team that scores more goals away from home over the two legs advances. If away goals are also equal, extra time is played. The away goals rule is again applied after extra time, i.e., if there are goals scored during extra time and the aggregate score is still level, the visiting team advances by virtue of more away goals scored. If no goals are scored during extra time, the tie is decided by penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 16.01).[5]

TeamsEdit

The 48 teams were seeded according to the coefficient ranking, calculated based on the following:[5][6][7]

The coefficient ranking was also used for seeding in the preliminary round and main round draws, where each team was assigned a seeding position according to their ranking for the respective draw. Eight teams were pre-selected as hosts for the preliminary round and eight teams were pre-selected as hosts for the main round.

The draws for the preliminary round and main round was held on 12 December 2018, 14:00 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[8] The mechanism of the draws for each round was as follows:

  • In the preliminary round, the 32 teams were drawn into eight groups of four containing one team from each of the seeding positions 1–4. First, the eight teams which were pre-selected as hosts were drawn from their own designated pot and allocated to their respective group as per their seeding positions. Next, the remaining 24 teams were drawn from their respective pot which were allocated according to their seeding positions. Based on the decisions taken by the UEFA Emergency Panel, Kosovo and Bosnia and Herzegovina could not be drawn in the same group.
  • In the main round, the 32 teams were drawn into eight groups of four, containing one team from each of the seeding positions 1–4. First, the eight teams which were pre-selected as hosts were drawn from their own designated pot and allocated to their respective group as per their seeding positions. Next, the remaining 24 teams were drawn from their respective pot which were allocated according to their seeding positions (including the eight preliminary round winners and eight preliminary round runners-up, whose identity was not known at the time of the draw, which were allocated to seeding positions 3 and 4 respectively). Winners and runners-up from the same preliminary round group could not be drawn in the same group. Based on the decisions taken by the UEFA Emergency Panel, should Armenia, Gibraltar, or Kosovo advance from the preliminary round and qualify for a main round group with Azerbaijan (Armenia), Spain (Gibraltar), or Bosnia and Herzegovina or Serbia (Kosovo), they would be swapped with the preliminary round group winner or runner-up in the same seeding position (3 or 4) of the next possible main round group. Should Kosovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia all end up in the same group, the preliminary round group runner-up would be moved first to the next possible main round group, followed, if necessary, by the preliminary round group winner to avoid the clashes.

World Cup hosts
Team Coeff.[6] Rank
 Lithuania 0.389 40
Participating teams for 2020 FIFA Futsal World Cup European qualifying
Teams entering main round
Team Coeff.[6] Rank Seed
 Russia 10.171 1 1
 Spain 10.022 2
 Portugal (H) 9.633 3
 Kazakhstan 9.000 4
 Ukraine (H) 8.389 5
 Azerbaijan (H) 7.822 6
 Italy (H) 7.444 7
 Serbia 6.833 8
 Slovenia 6.500 9 2
 Croatia (H) 4.278 10
 Hungary 4.111 11
 Czech Republic 3.611 12
 Romania (H) 3.500 13
 Poland (H) 3.389 14
 France (H) 2.944 15
 Slovakia 2.944 16
Teams entering preliminary round
Team Coeff.[6] Rank Seed
 Belarus (H) 2.889 17 1
 Netherlands 2.278 18
 Bosnia and Herzegovina (H) 2.222 19
 Belgium 2.111 20
 Georgia (H) 2.056 21
 North Macedonia (H) 2.000 22
 Finland 1.694 23
 Latvia (H) 1.222 24
 Turkey 1.222 25 2
 Moldova (H) 0.833 26
 England 0.833 27
 Albania 0.778 28
 Sweden (H) 0.778 29
 Montenegro 0.722 30
 Denmark 0.722 31
 Norway 0.722 32
 Kosovo 0.667 33 3
  Switzerland 0.583 34
 Bulgaria (H) 0.556 35
 Armenia 0.500 36
 Greece 0.500 37
 Germany 0.500 38
 Wales 0.389 39
 Cyprus 0.389 41
 Israel 0.278 42 4
 Andorra 0.222 43
 Estonia 0.111 44
 Malta 0.000 45
 Gibraltar 0.000 46
 San Marino 0.000 47
 Scotland 0.000 48
 Northern Ireland 0.000 (NR)
Notes
  • Teams marked in bold have qualified for the World Cup.
  • (NR) – No rank (men's team did not enter in the competitions used for computing coefficients)
  • (H): Teams pre-selected as hosts for the preliminary round and the main round
Did not enter (all no rank)
 Austria  Faroe Islands  Iceland
 Liechtenstein  Luxembourg  Republic of Ireland

ScheduleEdit

The qualifying matches are played on dates that fall within the FIFA Futsal International Match Calendar.

Schedule for 2020 FIFA Futsal World Cup European qualifying
Round Draw Dates
Preliminary round 12 December 2018 29 January – 3 February 2019
Main round 22–27 October 2019
Elite round 7 November 2019 27 January – 5 February 2020
Play-offs 2–11 November 2020 (originally 9 and 12 April 2020)

In the preliminary round, main round and elite round, the schedule of each group is as follows, with one rest day between matchdays 2 and 3 for four-team groups, and no rest days for three-team groups (Regulations Articles 18.04, 18.05 and 18.06):[5]

Note: For scheduling, the hosts are considered as Team 1, while the visiting teams are considered as Team 2, Team 3, and Team 4 according to their seeding positions.

Group schedule
Matchday Matches (4 teams) Matches (3 teams)
Matchday 1 2 v 4, 1 v 3 1 v 3
Matchday 2 3 v 2, 1 v 4 3 v 2
Matchday 3 4 v 3, 2 v 1 2 v 1

Preliminary roundEdit

The winners and runners-up of each group advanced to the main round to join the 16 teams which receive byes. The preliminary round was scheduled to be played between 29 January and 3 February 2019.

Times are CET (UTC+1), as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Latvia (H) 3 2 1 0 12 1 +11 7 Main round
2  England 3 2 0 1 10 8 +2 6
3  Cyprus 3 1 1 1 15 5 +10 4
4  Gibraltar 3 0 0 3 1 24 −23 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


England 4–1 Gibraltar
Report
Referee: Lukáš Peško (Slovakia), Jacob Pawlowski (Germany)
Latvia 0–0 Cyprus
Report
Referee: Kirill Naishouler (Finland), Besart Ismajli (Kosovo)

Cyprus 4–5 England
Report
Referee: Besart Ismajli (Kosovo), Lukáš Peško (Slovakia)
Latvia 9–0 Gibraltar
Report
Referee: Jacob Pawlowski (Germany), Kirill Naishouler (Finland)

Gibraltar 0–11 Cyprus
Report
Referee: Lukáš Peško (Slovakia), Besart Ismajli (Kosovo)
England 1–3 Latvia
Report
Referee: Kirill Naishouler (Finland), Jacob Pawlowski (Germany)

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Belarus (H) 3 3 0 0 17 1 +16 9 Main round
2  Kosovo 3 2 0 1 10 9 +1 6
3  Norway 3 1 0 2 7 15 −8 3
4  Andorra 3 0 0 3 6 15 −9 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Norway 5–3 Andorra
Report
Referee: Victor Berg-Audic (France), Shota Kukhilava (Georgia)
Belarus 5–0 Kosovo
Report
Referee: Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland), Eduards Fatkulins (Latvia)

Kosovo 5–1 Norway
Report
Referee: Eduards Fatkulins (Latvia), Victor Berg-Audic (France)
Belarus 5–0 Andorra
Report
Referee: Shota Kukhilava (Georgia), Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland)

Andorra 3–5 Kosovo
Report
Referee: Eduards Fatkulins (Latvia), Shota Kukhilava (Georgia)
Norway 1–7 Belarus
Report
Referee: Victor Berg-Audic (France), Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland)

Group CEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  North Macedonia (H) 3 3 0 0 15 5 +10 9 Main round
2  Albania 3 2 0 1 12 6 +6 6
3  Greece 3 1 0 2 9 11 −2 3
4  San Marino 3 0 0 3 1 15 −14 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Albania 5–0 San Marino
Report
Referee: Moshe Bohbot (Israel), Grigori Ošomkov (Estonia)
North Macedonia 5–3 Greece
Report
Referee: Dario Pezzuto (Italy), Viktor Bugenko (Moldova)

Greece 3–5 Albania
Report
Referee: Grigori Ošomkov (Estonia), Dario Pezzuto (Italy)
North Macedonia 7–0 San Marino
Report
Referee: Viktor Bugenko (Moldova), Moshe Bohbot (Israel)

San Marino 1–3 Greece
Report
Referee: Grigori Ošomkov (Estonia), Viktor Bugenko (Moldova)
Albania 2–3 North Macedonia
Report
Referee: Dario Pezzuto (Italy), Moshe Bohbot (Israel)

Group DEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Georgia (H) 3 3 0 0 18 3 +15 9 Main round
2  Germany 3 1 1 1 8 9 −1 4
3  Israel 3 0 2 1 3 10 −7 2
4  Denmark 3 0 1 2 5 12 −7 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Denmark 1–1 Israel
Report
Referee: Fredric Nilholt (Sweden), Slawomir Steczko (Poland)
Georgia 5–1 Germany
Report
Referee: Vladimir Kadykov (Russia), Kaloyan Kirilov (Bulgaria)

Germany 5–2 Denmark
Report
Referee: Slawomir Steczko (Poland), Vladimir Kadykov (Russia)
Georgia 7–0 Israel
Report
Referee: Kaloyan Kirilov (Bulgaria), Fredric Nilholt (Sweden)

Israel 2–2 Germany
Report
Referee: Fredric Nilholt (Sweden), Kaloyan Kirilov (Bulgaria)
Denmark 2–6 Georgia
Report
Referee: Vladimir Kadykov (Russia), Slawomir Steczko (Poland)

Group EEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Belgium 3 3 0 0 26 7 +19 9 Main round
2  Sweden (H) 3 2 0 1 13 10 +3 6
3  Armenia 3 1 0 2 6 10 −4 3
4  Malta 3 0 0 3 2 20 −18 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Belgium 12–0 Malta
Report
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Alem Bajrovic (Bosnia and Herzegovina)
Sweden 3–1 Armenia
Report
Referee: Hennadiy Hora (Ukraine), Jacob Willem Machiel Van Dijke (Netherlands)

Armenia 2–6 Belgium
Report
Referee: Jacob Willem Machiel Van Dijke (Netherlands), Alessandro Malfer (Italy)
Sweden 5–1 Malta
Report
Referee: Alem Bajrovic (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Hennadiy Hora (Ukraine)

Malta 1–3 Armenia
Report
Referee: Alem Bajrovic (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Jacob Willem Machiel Van Dijke (Netherlands)
Belgium 8–5 Sweden
Report
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Hennadiy Hora (Ukraine)

Group FEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Bosnia and Herzegovina (H) 3 3 0 0 24 4 +20 9 Main round
2   Switzerland 3 2 0 1 8 10 −2 6
3  Turkey 3 1 0 2 8 13 −5 3
4  Scotland 3 0 0 3 5 18 −13 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Bosnia and Herzegovina 7–1  Switzerland
Report
Referee: Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain), Maksim Dzeikala (Belarus)
Turkey 4–3 Scotland
Report
Referee: Stefan Vrijens (Belgium), Vlad Nicolae Ciobanu (Romania)

Switzerland  3–2 Turkey
Report
Referee: Vlad Nicolae Ciobanu (Romania), Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain)
Bosnia and Herzegovina 10–1 Scotland
Report
Referee: Maksim Dzeikala (Belarus), Stefan Vrijens (Belgium)

Scotland 1–4  Switzerland
Report
Referee: Maksim Dzeikala (Belarus), Vlad Nicolae Ciobanu (Romania)
Turkey 2–7 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Referee: Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain), Stefan Vrijens (Belgium)

Group GEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Netherlands 3 3 0 0 14 4 +10 9 Main round
2  Montenegro 3 1 1 1 7 5 +2 4
3  Bulgaria (H) 3 1 1 1 5 9 −4 4
4  Estonia 3 0 0 3 3 11 −8 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Bulgaria 1–1 Montenegro
Report
Referee: Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus), Hikmat Qafarli (Azerbaijan)
Netherlands 4–1 Estonia
Report
Referee: Javier Moreno Reina (Spain), Daniele D'adamo (San Marino)

Bulgaria 3–2 Estonia
Report
Referee: Daniele D'adamo (San Marino), Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus)
Montenegro 2–4 Netherlands
Report
Referee: Hikmat Qafarli (Azerbaijan), Javier Moreno Reina (Spain)

Estonia 0–4 Montenegro
Report
Referee: Daniele D'adamo (San Marino), Hikmat Qafarli (Azerbaijan)
Netherlands 6–1 Bulgaria
Report
Referee: Javier Moreno Reina (Spain), Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus)

Group HEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Moldova (H) 3 3 0 0 23 8 +15 9 Main round
2  Finland 3 2 0 1 17 3 +14 6
3  Wales 3 1 0 2 7 17 −10 3
4  Northern Ireland 3 0 0 3 6 25 −19 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Moldova 8–4 Wales
Report
Referee: Grigori Zelentsov (Russia), Dejan Veselic (Slovenia)
Finland 9–1 Northern Ireland
Report
Referee: Josip Barton (Macedonia), Norbert Szilágyi (Hungary)

Wales 0–7 Finland
Report
Referee: Dejan Veselic (Slovenia), Josip Barton (Macedonia)
Moldova 13–3 Northern Ireland
Report
Referee: Norbert Szilágyi (Hungary), Grigori Zelentsov (Russia)

Northern Ireland 2–3 Wales
Report
Referee: Norbert Szilágyi (Hungary), Josip Barton (Macedonia)
Finland 1–2 Moldova
Report
Referee: Dejan Veselic (Slovenia), Grigori Zelentsov (Russia)

Main roundEdit

The winners and runners-up of each group advanced to the elite round. The main round was scheduled to be played between 22 and 27 October 2019.

Times up to 26 October 2019 are CEST (UTC+2), thereafter times are CET (UTC+1), as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Group 1Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 3 3 0 0 11 4 +7 9 Elite round
2  Finland 3 2 0 1 8 7 +1 6
3  Georgia 3 1 0 2 7 10 −3 3
4  Poland (H) 3 0 0 3 4 9 −5 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Spain 4–1 Finland
Report
Referee: Dario Pezzuto (Italy), Cédric Pelissier (France)
Poland 2–3 Georgia
Report

Georgia 2–3 Spain
Report
Poland 1–2 Finland
Report
Referee: Cédric Pelissier (France), Dario Pezzuto (Italy)

Finland 5–2 Georgia
Report
Referee: Cédric Pelissier (France), Josip Barton (Macedonia)
Spain 4–1 Poland
Report

Group 2Edit

Note: Ukraine were originally to host.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Slovenia 3 2 1 0 15 4 +11 7 Elite round
2  Ukraine 3 2 1 0 14 4 +10 7
3  Kosovo 3 1 0 2 9 19 −10 3
4  North Macedonia (H) 3 0 0 3 7 18 −11 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Ukraine 7–1 Kosovo
Report
Referee: Marc Birkett (England), Julien Lang (France)
North Macedonia 1–6 Slovenia
Report
Referee: Gerd Bylois (Belgium), Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland)

North Macedonia 5–7 Kosovo
Report
Referee: Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland), Marc Birkett (England)
Slovenia 2–2 Ukraine
Report
Referee: Julien Lang (France), Gerd Bylois (Belgium)

Ukraine 5–1 North Macedonia
Report
Referee: Gerd Bylois (Belgium), Marc Birkett (England)
Kosovo 1–7 Slovenia
Report
Referee: Julien Lang (France), Daniel Matkovic (Switzerland)

Group 3Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Azerbaijan (H) 3 3 0 0 8 3 +5 9 Elite round
2  Slovakia 3 2 0 1 12 6 +6 6
3  Montenegro 3 1 0 2 6 11 −5 3
4  Moldova 3 0 0 3 8 14 −6 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Slovakia 5–0 Montenegro
Report
Referee: Miguel Castilho (Portugal), Ingo Heemsoth (Germany)
Azerbaijan 3–1 Moldova
Report
Referee: Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic), Ingus Puriņš (Latvia)

Moldova 4–7 Slovakia
Report
Referee: Ingus Puriņš (Latvia), Miguel Castilho (Portugal)
Azerbaijan 3–2 Montenegro
Report
Referee: Ingo Heemsoth (Germany), Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic)

Montenegro 4–3 Moldova
Report
Referee: Miguel Castilho (Portugal), Ingo Heemsoth (Germany)
Slovakia 0–2 Azerbaijan
Report
Referee: Ondřej Černý (Czech Republic), Ingus Puriņš (Latvia)

Group 4Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Italy (H) 3 2 1 0 11 5 +6 7 Elite round
2  Belarus 3 2 1 0 10 5 +5 7
3  Hungary 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3
4  England 3 0 0 3 3 12 −9 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Hungary 3–0 England
Report
Referee: Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal), Antonios Adamopoulos (Greece)
Italy 3–3 Belarus
Report
Referee: Saša Tomić (Croatia), Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus)

Belarus 2–0 Hungary
Report
Referee: Antonios Adamopoulos (Greece), Saša Tomić (Croatia)
Italy 4–1 England
Report
Referee: Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus), Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal)

Hungary 1–4 Italy
Report
Referee: Saša Tomić (Croatia), Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal)
England 2–5 Belarus
Report
Referee: Costas Nicolaou (Cyprus), Antonios Adamopoulos (Greece)

Group 5Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Kazakhstan 3 3 0 0 13 2 +11 9 Elite round
2  Romania (H) 3 1 1 1 6 6 0 4
3  Netherlands 3 0 2 1 5 10 −5 2
4  Albania 3 0 1 2 5 11 −6 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Kazakhstan 4–0 Albania
Report
Referee: Vitali Rakutski (Belarus), Yevhen Hordiienko (Ukraine)
Romania 1–1 Netherlands
Report
Referee: Angelo Galante (Italy), Fredric Nilholt (Sweden)

Netherlands 0–5 Kazakhstan
Report
Referee: Fredric Nilholt (Sweden), Vitali Rakutski (Belarus)
Romania 3–1 Albania
Report
Referee: Yevhen Hordiienko (Ukraine), Angelo Galante (Italy)

Albania 4–4 Netherlands
Report
Referee: Yevhen Hordiienko (Ukraine), Fredric Nilholt (Sweden)
Kazakhstan 4–2 Romania
Report
Referee: Angelo Galante (Italy), Vitali Rakutski (Belarus)

Group 6Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Serbia 3 3 0 0 14 5 +9 9 Elite round
2  France (H) 3 2 0 1 12 9 +3 6
3  Belgium 3 1 0 2 13 10 +3 3
4   Switzerland 3 0 0 3 4 19 −15 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Serbia 7–0  Switzerland
Report
Referee: Tomasz Frak (Poland), Sarunas Tamulynas (Lithuania)
France 5–3 Belgium
Report
Referee: Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain), Iurii Neverov (Russia)

Belgium 1–2 Serbia
Report
Referee: Sarunas Tamulynas (Lithuania), Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain)
France 3–1  Switzerland
Report
Referee: Iurii Neverov (Russia), Tomasz Frak (Poland)

Switzerland  3–9 Belgium
Report
Referee: Iurii Neverov (Russia), Sarunas Tamulynas (Lithuania)
Serbia 5–4 France
Report
Referee: Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain), Tomasz Frak (Poland)

Group 7Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Russia 3 2 1 0 13 7 +6 7 Elite round
2  Croatia (H) 3 2 1 0 9 3 +6 7
3  Bosnia and Herzegovina 3 1 0 2 8 11 −3 3
4  Sweden 3 0 0 3 7 16 −9 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Russia 7–3 Sweden
Report
Referee: Borislav Kolev (Bulgaria), Radim Cep (Czech Republic)
Croatia 4–0 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Referee: Kamil Çetin (Turkey), Adrian Tschopp (Switzerland)

Bosnia and Herzegovina 2–4 Russia
Report
Croatia 3–1 Sweden
Report
Referee: Adrian Tschopp (Switzerland), Borislav Kolev (Bulgaria)

Sweden 3–6 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Report
Russia 2–2 Croatia
Report
Referee: Borislav Kolev (Bulgaria), Kamil Çetin (Turkey)

Group 8Edit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Portugal (H) 3 3 0 0 13 1 +12 9 Elite round
2  Czech Republic 3 2 0 1 11 5 +6 6
3  Latvia 3 1 0 2 8 13 −5 3
4  Germany 3 0 0 3 2 15 −13 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Czech Republic 3–0 Germany
Report
Referee: Vladimir Kadykov (Russia), Vladan Radulović (Serbia)
Portugal 4–0 Latvia
Report
Referee: Admir Zahovič (Slovenia), Idan Berenshtein (Israel)

Latvia 1–7 Czech Republic
Report
Referee: Idan Berenshtein (Israel), Vladimir Kadykov (Russia)
Portugal 5–0 Germany
Report
Referee: Vladan Radulović (Serbia), Admir Zahovič (Slovenia)

Germany 2–7 Latvia
Report
Referee: Vladan Radulović (Serbia), Idan Berenshtein (Israel)
Czech Republic 1–4 Portugal
Report
Referee: Admir Zahovič (Slovenia), Vladimir Kadykov (Russia)

Elite roundEdit

The draws for the elite round and play-offs were held on 7 November 2019, 14:15 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[9] For the elite round, the 16 teams were drawn into four groups of four, containing one best-four ranked main round group winner according to the coefficient ranking (seeding position 1), one other main round group winner (seeding position 2), and two main round group runners-up (seeding positions 3 or 4). First, a draw was held to select the four hosts from the seven potential hosts, which were allocated to their respective group as per their seeding positions. Next, the remaining 12 teams (including potential hosts not selected) were drawn from their respective pot which were allocated according to their seeding positions (group runners-up, including hosts, were allocated to first seeding position 4, then seeding position 3). Teams from the same main round group could be drawn in the same group. Based on the decisions taken by the UEFA Emergency Panel, Russia and Ukraine could not be drawn in the same group.

Legend
  • (Rank): Coefficient ranking for seeding[10]
  • (H): Elite round hosts selected by draw
  • (h): Potential elite round hosts not selected by draw
Advanced from main round
Group Winners Runners-up
Seed Seeding position 1 (best-four ranked) Seeding position 3 or 4
Seeding position 2 (others)
1  Spain (2) (h)  Finland (23)
2  Slovenia (9)  Ukraine (5) (h)
3  Azerbaijan (6)  Slovakia (16)
4  Italy (7)  Belarus (17)
5  Kazakhstan (4)  Romania (13)
6  Serbia (8) (H)  France (15)
7  Russia (1) (h)  Croatia (10) (H)
8  Portugal (3) (H)  Czech Republic (12) (H)

For the play-offs, the four elite round group runners-up, whose identity was not known at the time of the draw, were drawn into two ties without any seeding. As Russia and Ukraine could not play against each other, if such a tie occur in the play-offs after the completion of the elite round, the second teams drawn in the two ties (who play the first leg away) would be swapped.

The winners of each group qualified for the 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup, while the runners-up of each group advanced to the play-offs. The elite round was scheduled to be played between 27 January and 5 February 2020.

Times are CET (UTC+1), as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Group AEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Portugal (H) 3 2 1 0 8 4 +4 7 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup
2  Finland 3 1 2 0 8 6 +2 5 Play-offs
3  Italy 3 1 1 1 8 9 −1 4
4  Belarus 3 0 0 3 6 11 −5 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Italy 2–2 Finland
Report
Referee: Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain), David Urdanoz Apezteguia (Spain)
Portugal 2–1 Belarus
Report
Referee: Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain), Javier Moreno Reina (Spain)

Belarus 3–5 Italy
Report
Referee: David Urdanoz Apezteguia (Spain), Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain)
Portugal 2–2 Finland
Report
Referee: Javier Moreno Reina (Spain), Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain)

Finland 4–2 Belarus
Report
Referee: Alejandro Martinez Flores (Spain), Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain)
Italy 1–4 Portugal
Report
Referee: David Urdanoz Apezteguia (Spain), Javier Moreno Reina (Spain)

Group BEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 3 3 0 0 11 3 +8 9 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup
2  Serbia (H) 3 2 0 1 10 9 +1 6 Play-offs
3  France 3 0 1 2 5 9 −4 1
4  Ukraine 3 0 1 2 5 10 −5 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host


Serbia 5–2 Ukraine
Report
Referee: Miguel Castilho (Portugal), Filipe Gonçalo Santos Duarte (Portugal)
Spain 3–1 France
Report
Referee: Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal), Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal)

Serbia 4–2 France
Report
Referee: Filipe Gonçalo Santos Duarte (Portugal), Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal)
Ukraine 1–3 Spain
Report
Referee: Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal), Miguel Castilho (Portugal)

France 2–2 Ukraine
Report
Referee: Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal), Filipe Gonçalo Santos Duarte (Portugal)
Spain 5–1 Serbia
Report
Referee: Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal), Miguel Castilho (Portugal)

Group CEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Russia 3 2 0 1 14 8 +6 6[a] 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup
2  Croatia (H) 3 2 0 1 8 6 +2 6[a] Play-offs
3  Azerbaijan 3 1 1 1 7 8 −1 4
4  Slovakia 3 0 1 2 6 13 −7 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Ranked on head-to-head points: Russia 3, Croatia 0.


Russia 7–1 Slovakia
Report
Attendance: 150
Referee: Chiara Perona (Italy), Alessandro Malfer (Italy)
Croatia 2–0 Azerbaijan
Report
Attendance: 700
Referee: Angelo Galante (Italy), Nicola Manzione (Italy)

Azerbaijan 4–3 Russia
Report
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Angelo Galante (Italy)
Croatia 3–2 Slovakia
Report
Referee: Nicola Manzione (Italy), Chiara Perona (Italy)

Slovakia 3–3 Azerbaijan
Report
Referee: Angelo Galante (Italy), Chiara Perona (Italy)
Russia 4–3 Croatia
Report
Referee: Alessandro Malfer (Italy), Nicola Manzione (Italy)

Group DEdit

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Kazakhstan 3 2 0 1 10 8 +2 6[a] 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup
2  Czech Republic (H) 3 2 0 1 9 6 +3 6[a] Play-offs
3  Romania 3 1 1 1 7 9 −2 4
4  Slovenia 3 0 1 2 8 11 −3 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Ranked on head-to-head points: Kazakhstan 3, Czech Republic 0.


Czech Republic 3–1 Slovenia
Report
Referee: Ivan Shabanov (Russia), Iurii Neverov (Russia)
Kazakhstan 1–3 Romania
Report
Referee: Vladimir Kadykov (Russia), Irina Velikanova (Russia)

Czech Republic 4–0 Romania
Report
Referee: Irina Velikanova (Russia), Ivan Shabanov (Russia)
Slovenia 3–4 Kazakhstan
Report
Referee: Iurii Neverov (Russia), Vladimir Kadykov (Russia)

Romania 4–4 Slovenia
Report
Referee: Vladimir Kadykov (Russia), Ivan Shabanov (Russia)
Kazakhstan 5–2 Czech Republic
Report
Referee: Irina Velikanova (Russia), Iurii Neverov (Russia)

Play-offsEdit

The winners of each tie qualify for the 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup. The play-offs were originally scheduled to be played on 9 and 12 April 2020, but had been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, initially to a later date tentatively between June and mid-August.[11][12] On 17 June 2020, UEFA announced that the matches had been rescheduled to be played between 2 and 11 November 2020.[13][14]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Croatia  4–4 (5–6 p)  Czech Republic 2–2 2–2 (a.e.t.)
Serbia  6–5  Finland 1–0 5–5

Times are CET (UTC+1), as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Croatia 2–2 Czech Republic
Report
Referee: Juan José Cordero Gallardo (Spain), Alejandro Martínez Flores (Spain)
Czech Republic 2–2 (a.e.t.) Croatia
Report
Penalties
6–5
Referee: Cédric Pelissier (France), Victor Berg-Audic (France)

4–4 on aggregate. The Czech Republic won 6–5 on penalties and qualified for the 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup.


Serbia 1–0 Finland
Report
Referee: Eduardo Fernandes Coelho (Portugal), Cristiano José Cardoso Santos (Portugal)
Finland 5–5 Serbia
Report
Referee: Gábor Kovács (Hungary), Balázs Farkas (Hungary)

Serbia won 6–5 on aggregate.

Qualified teams for FIFA Futsal World CupEdit

The following seven teams from UEFA qualified for the 2021 FIFA Futsal World Cup, including Lithuania which qualified as hosts.[17]

Team Qualified as Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA Futsal World Cup1
 Lithuania Hosts 26 October 2018[3] 0 (debut)
 Portugal Elite round Group A winners 2 February 2020[18] 5 (2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016)
 Spain Elite round Group B winners 4 February 2020[18] 8 (1989, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016)
 Russia Elite round Group C winners 1 February 2020[18] 6 (1992, 1996, 2000, 2008, 2012, 2016)
 Kazakhstan Elite round Group D winners 5 February 2020[18] 2 (2000, 2016)
 Czech Republic Play-off winners 10 November 2020[19] 3 (2004, 2008, 2012)
 Serbia Play-off winners 9 December 2020[20] 1 (2012)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Top goalscorersEdit

  • Preliminary round: There were 323 goals scored in 48 matches, for an average of 6.73 goals per match.
  • Main round: There were 280 goals scored in 48 matches, for an average of 5.83 goals per match.
  • Elite round: There were 130 goals scored in 24 matches, for an average of 5.42 goals per match.
  • Play-offs: There were 19 goals scored in 4 matches, for an average of 4.75 goals per match.

— Team eliminated / inactive for this stage.

Rank Player PR MR ER PO Total
1 Kazakhstan Douglas Júnior 4 4 8
Netherlands Mats Velseboer 6 2
Bosnia and Herzegovina Anel Radmilović 7 1
4 Switzerland Alessandro Facchinetti 4 3 7
Bosnia and Herzegovina Nermin Kahvedžić 6 1
Kosovo Ramadan Alaj 6 1
Moldova Cristian Obadă 6 1
8 Serbia Marko Pršić 1 3 2 6
Finland Panu Autio 2 2 2
Czech Republic Michal Holý 2 3 1
Portugal Fernando Cardinal 4 2
Slovenia Kristjan Čujec 4 2
Kazakhstan Taynan 4 2
Finland Miika Hosio 2 2 2
Slovakia Tomáš Drahovský 5 1
Moldova Andrei Negara 3 3
Belgium Valentin Dujacquier 4 2
Georgia (country) Thales 4 2
Moldova Sergiu Tacot 5 1

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The second leg match between Finland and Serbia was originally scheduled to be played on 10 November, 19:00 EET, at Energia Areena, Vantaa, but was postponed due to members of the Finland team testing positive for the COVID-19 virus which required both teams to be quarantined.[15] It was rescheduled to 9 December 2020.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New dates for UEFA futsal competitions". UEFA.com. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  2. ^ "FIFA Futsal World Cup 2020 – slot allocation" (PDF). FIFA.com. 14 June 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Lithuania to host 2020 Futsal World Cup". UEFA.com. 26 October 2018.
  4. ^ "Bureau of the FIFA Council decisions on FIFA events". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 12 May 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e "Regulations of the European Qualifying Competition for the 2020 FIFA Futsal World Cup". UEFA.com.
  6. ^ a b c d "UEFA Futsal National Teams coefficient ranking 2018/19" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  7. ^