1962 Formula One season

The 1962 Formula One season was the 16th season of FIA Formula One motor racing. It featured the 13th World Championship of Drivers, the 5th International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, and numerous non-championship Formula One races. The World Championship was contested over nine races between 20 May and 29 December 1962.

Graham Hill won the first of his two championships, driving for BRM

Graham Hill driving for BRM won his first Drivers' Championship when rival Jim Clark retired from the last race.[1] BRM also won the Manufacturers' Championship for the first time, and it would be the only time.[2]

Double World Champion Jack Brabham formed his own team and debuted the Brabham BT3 in the United States Grand Prix, becoming the first ever F1 driver to score championship points in a car bearing his own name.

Ricardo Rodríguez suffered a fatal crash during practice for his home race, the non-championship Mexican Grand Prix. He had been the youngest ever driver for Scuderia Ferrari, but also became the youngest ever F1 driver to die.

Teams and drivers

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The following teams and drivers competed in the 1962 FIA World Championship. All teams competed with tyres supplied by Dunlop.

Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Driver Rounds
  Scuderia Ferrari SpA SEFAC Ferrari 156 Ferrari 178 1.5 V6   Phil Hill 1–3, 5–7
  Giancarlo Baghetti 1, 3, 6–7
  Ricardo Rodríguez 1–3, 6–7
  Lorenzo Bandini 2, 6–7
  Willy Mairesse 2–3, 7
  Team Lotus Lotus-Climax 25
24
Climax FWMV 1.5 V8   Jim Clark All
  Trevor Taylor All
  Cooper Car Company Cooper-Climax T60
T55
T53
Climax FWMV 1.5 V8
Climax FPF 1.5 L4
  Bruce McLaren All
  Tony Maggs All
  Timmy Mayer 8
  Brabham Racing Organisation Lotus-Climax 24 Climax FWMV 1.5 V8   Jack Brabham 1–5
Brabham-Climax BT3 6, 8–9
  UDT Laystall Racing Team Lotus-Climax 24
18/21
Climax FWMV 1.5 V8
Climax FPF 1.5 L4
  Innes Ireland 1–5, 7–9
  Masten Gregory 1, 5
Lotus-BRM 24 BRM P56 1.5 V8 2–4, 7–8
  Porsche System Engineering Porsche 804
718
Porsche 753 1.5 F8
Porsche 547/3 1.5 F4
  Jo Bonnier 1–2, 4–8
  Dan Gurney 1–2, 4–8
  Phil Hill 8
  Ecurie Maarsbergen Porsche 718
787
Porsche 547/3 1.5 F4   Carel Godin de Beaufort All
  Ben Pon 1
Emeryson-Climax 61 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Wolfgang Seidel 1
  Owen Racing Organisation BRM P57
P48/57
BRM P56 1.5 V8   Graham Hill All
  Richie Ginther All
  Bruce Johnstone 9
  Bowmaker-Yeoman Racing Team Lola-Climax Mk4 Climax FWMV 1.5 V8   John Surtees All
  Roy Salvadori 1–2, 4–9
  Ecurie Galloise Cooper-Climax T53 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Jackie Lewis 1, 4–6
BRM P48/57 BRM P56 1.5 V8 2
  R.R.C. Walker Racing Team Lotus-Climax 24 Climax FWMV 1.5 V8   Maurice Trintignant 2–4, 6–8
  Ecurie Nationale Suisse

  Ecurie Filipinetti

Lotus-Climax 21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Jo Siffert 2–3, 6
Lotus-BRM 24 BRM P56 1.5 V8 4, 7
  Heinz Schiller 6
Porsche 718 Porsche 547/3 1.5 F4   Heini Walter 6
  Scuderia SSS Republica di Venezia Lotus-Climax 18/21
24
Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Nino Vaccarella 2, 7
Porsche 718 Porsche 547/3 1.5 F4 6
  Emeryson Cars Lotus-Climax 18 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   John Campbell-Jones 3
Emeryson-Climax 61   Tony Settember 5, 7
  Equipe Nationale Belge Lotus-Climax 18/21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Lucien Bianchi 3
ENB-Maserati F1 Maserati Tipo 6 1.5 L4 6
  Autosport Team Wolfgang Seidel Lotus-BRM 24 BRM P56 1.5 V8   Dan Gurney 3
  Wolfgang Seidel 5–6
  Gunther Seiffert 6
  Tony Shelly 7
  Anglo-American Equipe Cooper-Climax T59 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Ian Burgess 5–7
  Ecurie Excelsior Lotus-Climax 18 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Jay Chamberlain 5–7
  John Dalton Lotus-Climax 18/21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Tony Shelly 5–6
  Gilby Engineering Gilby-BRM 62 BRM P56 1.5 V8   Keith Greene 6–7
  Bernard Collomb Cooper-Climax T53 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Bernard Collomb 6
  Scuderia de Tomaso De Tomaso 801 De Tomaso 1.5 F8   Nasif Estéfano 7
  Scuderia Settecolli De Tomaso-OSCA F1 OSCA 372 1.5 L4   Roberto Lippi 7
  Gerry Ashmore Lotus-Climax 18/21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Gerry Ashmore 7
  Scuderia Jolly Club Lotus-Climax 18 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Ernesto Prinoth 7
  Dupont Team Zerex Lotus-Climax 24 Climax FWMV 1.5 V8   Roger Penske 8
  Hap Sharp Cooper-Climax T53 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Hap Sharp 8
  Jim Hall Lotus-Climax 21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Jim Hall 8
  John Mecom Lotus-Climax 24 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Rob Schroeder 8
  Ernie Pieterse Lotus-Climax 21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Ernie Pieterse 9
  John Love Cooper-Climax T55 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   John Love 9
  Neville Lederle Lotus-Climax 21 Climax FPF 1.5 L4   Neville Lederle 9
  Otelle Nucci LDS-Alfa Romeo Mk 1 Alfa Romeo Giulietta 1.5 L4   Doug Serrurier 9
  Mike Harris Cooper-Alfa Romeo T53 Alfa Romeo Giulietta 1.5 L4   Mike Harris 9

Team and driver changes

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Stirling Moss (pictured in 2011) had signed with Ferrari for 1962, but a pre-season accident meant the end of his racing career.
 
Double World Champion Jack Brabham set up his own team for 1962 and had his own chassis designed: the BT3 (pictured in 2019).

Mid-season changes

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Calendar

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Round Grand Prix Circuit Date
1   Dutch Grand Prix Circuit Zandvoort, Zandvoort 20 May
2   Monaco Grand Prix Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo 3 June
3   Belgian Grand Prix Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps, Stavelot 17 June
4   French Grand Prix Rouen-Les-Essarts, Orival 8 July
5   British Grand Prix Aintree Motor Racing Circuit, Merseyside 21 July
6   German Grand Prix Nürburgring, Nürburg 5 August
7   Italian Grand Prix Autodromo Nazionale di Monza, Monza 16 September
8   United States Grand Prix Watkins Glen International, New York 7 October
9   South African Grand Prix Prince George Circuit, East London 29 December

Calendar changes

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Championship report

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Rounds 1 to 3

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Graham Hill (BRM) won the season opener, the Dutch Grand Prix.

The Dutch Grand Prix hosted the season opener for the first time and was granted the honorary designation of European Grand Prix for this year. Lotus turned up with a revolutionary new chassis, the Lotus 25 being the first car built around an aluminium monocoque instead of a space frame. However, it was John Surtees who took pole position in the privately run Lola, ahead of Graham Hill for BRM. Lotus's Jim Clark qualified third, but this meant he had the inside line to the first corner and he managed to take the lead. Dan Gurney in the Porsche had a wonderful start from eighth to take third behind Hill and ahead of Surtees. The top three were steady in the opening phase, but then, both Clark and Gurney ran into technical troubles. Around the same time, the front wishbone broke on Surtees's Lola and he had a heavy crash but escaped unhurt. Graham Hill led away and scored the victory. Bruce McLaren (Cooper) was running second before he retired with a broken gearbox. Reigning champion Phil Hill (Ferrari) was running third at the time, inheritering second but later getting overtaken by Trevor Taylor (Lotus).[5]

Jim Clark scored his first career pole in the Monaco Grand Prix, ahead of Graham Hill and Bruce McLaren. But due to a confusing start procedure, it was Willy Mairesse in the Ferrari who went by, touching wheels with Clark and Hill in the process and locking up his wheels into the first corner. A chain reaction led to an accident with six drivers, three of whom retired on the spot. Mairesse took the lead but spun his car in the second hairpin, making the order at the end of the first lap: McLaren, Graham Hill, Phil Hill. McLaren was relegated back to second by lap 7, and then third by Clark, who was recovering from a bad start, was setting multiple fastest laps and started challenging Hill for the lead. On lap 55, however, his clutch gave out and he had to retire. But Hill was not yet out of the woods, with his BRM engine starting to smoke and McLaren, back in second, getting ever closer. On lap 93, Hill's engine gave up with a bang, although he still scored a point, as he was classified in sixth. McLaren was challenged by Phil Hill but held on to score his first win in two years. Lorenzo Bandini finished third in his first race for Ferrari.[6]

The Belgian Grand Prix saw Graham Hill qualify on pole, ahead of McLaren, Taylor and home hero Mairesse. In the first phase of the race, those four were fighting over the lead in close combat and their relative positions changed all the while. Clark had started in twelfth, but joined the leading group. On lap 11, Clark set the fastest lap and took the lead, with teammate Taylor holding back their rivals. Clark held on to take the win, but getting up to the final corner of lap 26, Taylor crashed with Mairesse, the Lotus cutting down a telegraph pole and the Ferrari landing upside down on fire. Both drivers were flung out and suffered minor injuries. Graham Hill finished second, Phil Hill third. Ricardo Rodríguez came home in fourth, becoming the youngest F1 driver ever to score points. This record stood until Jenson Button broke it in the 2000 Brazilian Grand Prix.[7]

In the Drivers' Championship, Graham Hill (BRM) was leading with 16 points, ahead of 1961 champion Phil Hill (Ferrari) with 14 and Jim Clark (Lotus) with 9. In the Manufacturers' Championship, BRM went ahead with 16 points, ahead of Lotus (15) and Ferrari (14).

Rounds 4 to 6

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The French Grand Prix saw Jim Clark qualify on pole position in his Lotus, ahead of championship leader Graham Hill for BRM and Bruce McLaren for Cooper. Although Ferrari had withdrawn from the event due to strike actions,[8] the first three rows were occupied by seven different teams and five different constructors. Fifth-starting John Surtees was in second after the first lap and challenged Hill for the lead, but had to pit when his engine had trouble picking up fuel. Jackie Lewis was lapped by Hill but then suddenly lost his brakes and rear-ended the leader. Clark took the lead, but was caught by Hill within three laps, confirming to the Lotus team that their car was not running well, and they decided to retire from the race. Further drama ensued when Hill's BRM engine had jammed with ten laps to go, paving the way for Dan Gurney taking his first and Porsche's only win. South African Tony Maggs was second for Cooper, scoring his first podium, and Richie Ginther third for BRM.[9]

During the British Grand Prix, Clark scored his third pole position of the year, this time ahead of Surtees and Ireland. The latter, however, could not get his Lotus to fire up and was passed at by everyone at the start. McLaren took over third place. The top three remained unchanged throughout the race, with Clark taking an unchallenged win and even getting close to lapping championship leader Hill, who came home in fourth.[10]

 
In the German Grand Prix, the top three (Hill, Surtees, Gurney) finished within five seconds of each other.

The German Grand Prix saw the debut of Brabham's first F1 chassis, designed by Ron Tauranac. Scuderia Ferrari, having recovered from strikes in Italy,[8] brought an upgraded chassis and gave it to Lorenzo Bandini to try it out. During practice, Carel Godin de Beaufort was running his Porsche with a large camera mounted to the rear by the German television crew. The device fell off, however, and championship leader Hill was the unlucky victim, unable to avoid it, breaking his oil lines and quickly spinning off the track. Tony Maggs then slid on Hill's oil and had a similar accident, but both drivers were unhurt. Gurney started on pole, ahead of Hill and Clark, but the race was delayed for over an hour, after a sudden downpour made the track incredibly slippery. When the race got underway, Clark stalled his engine and fell back, but he passed 17 cars on the first lap. The leading pair went side-by-side as they started the third lap and it was Hill who came out on top. Surtees had inherited third place from Clark and this top three got away from the rest. Surtees got second place when Gurney's battery came loose and the American had to secure by hand. At half-distance, Clark had recovered to fourth place, mastering the wet conditions and gaining at least five seconds per lap on the leading trio. After almost losing the car twice at high speed, however, the Scot settled down. Surtees tried to push Hill into making a mistake but the Brit held on, taking the win, with Surtees and Gurney finishing within the next five seconds.[11]

In the Drivers' Championship, Graham Hill (BRM) was still holding onto the lead with 28 points, ahead of Jim Clark (Lotus) with 21 and John Surtees (Lola) with 19. In the Manufacturers' Championship, BRM were leading with 31, ahead of Lotus (27) and Cooper (23).

Rounds 7 to 9

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Ferrari entered five cars in their home race, two of which, including Giancarlo Baghetti (pictured), finished in the points.

The Italian Grand Prix was run on the road circuit of Monza, abandoning the fearsome banked oval. Jim Clark, second in the championship, qualified on pole position, ahead of championship leader Graham Hill and his teammate Richie Ginther. Hill took the lead at the start and led a group eight cars. Ferrari had brought five cars to their home race but they were all down in the second group. Clark pitted with transmission problems, while Hill managed to create some space between him and the rest. BRM scored a comfortable 1-2, while close fighting and a light rain shower provided exciting battles, from which Bruce McLaren came up to complete the podium.[12]

F1 moved overseas for the United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen. In repeat of this year's French GP and last year's US GP, Ferrari withdrew from this race and the next because of ongoing strikes in Italy.[8] Clark qualified on pole, ahead of Ginther and Hill, and the Lotus was fastest at the start. Hill went into second, trying everything to stay with his rival. This paid off on lap 12, when Clark was held up by a backmarker and Hill swooped by. On lap 19, however, Clark snatched the lead back and held on to take the win, ten seconds ahead of Hill. The rest of the field, all at least a lap down, were led by third-placed McLaren.[13]

Coming to the season finale, the South African Grand Prix, Clark had a nine-point deficit to Hill. If Clark would manage to win the race, then Hill could finish second at best, which meant that his result would not count - only the five best results of the season counted towards the championship. This would result in a tie on points, and Clark would win the title on countback - he would have four wins against Hill's three.

Clark started off well, scoring his sixth pole position of the season, with Hill starting alongside him. He held the lead at the start and then pulled away by a second per lap. He had an immense lead of half a minute when, suddenly, blue smoke started pouring from his engine. After stopping in the pits, it was found that a bolt was missing from the crankcase, which had allowed oil to leak out. The smoke was caused by the oil leaking on the exhaust. The Lotus mechanics did not have a fix, which meant Clark had to retire and give up the championship. Hill could cruise to the finish but still won the race almost 50 seconds ahead of McLaren and home hero Tony Maggs.[14]

The Drivers' Championship was settled with Graham Hill (BRM) on 42 points, winning his first title, ahead of Jim Clark (Lotus) on 30 and Bruce McLaren (Cooper) on 27. The Manufacturers' Championship was won by BRM with 42 points, ahead of Lotus (36) and Cooper (29).

Results and standings

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Grands Prix

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Round Grand Prix Pole position Fastest lap Winning driver Winning constructor Tyre Report
1   Dutch Grand Prix   John Surtees   Bruce McLaren   Graham Hill   BRM D Report
2   Monaco Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Bruce McLaren   Cooper-Climax D Report
3   Belgian Grand Prix   Graham Hill   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax D Report
4   French Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Graham Hill   Dan Gurney   Porsche D Report
5   British Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax D Report
6   German Grand Prix   Dan Gurney   Graham Hill   Graham Hill   BRM D Report
7   Italian Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Graham Hill   Graham Hill   BRM D Report
8   United States Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax D Report
9   South African Grand Prix   Jim Clark   Jim Clark   Graham Hill   BRM D Report

World Drivers' Championship standings

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Points towards the 1962 World Championship of Drivers were awarded on a 9–6–4–3–2–1 basis to the first six finishers in each race, with the best five race results retained by each driver.

Pos. Driver NED
 
MON
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
ITA
 
USA
 
RSA
 
Pts.
1   Graham Hill 1 (6) 2 9 (4) 1 1 (2) 1 42 (52)
2   Jim Clark 9 Ret 1 Ret 1 4 Ret 1 Ret 30
3   Bruce McLaren Ret 1 Ret (4) 3 (5) 3 3 2 27 (32)
4   John Surtees Ret 4 5 5 2 2 Ret Ret Ret 19
5   Dan Gurney Ret Ret DNS 1 9 3 13 5 15
6   Phil Hill 3 2 3 Ret Ret 11 DNS 14
7   Tony Maggs 5 Ret Ret 2 6 9 7 7 3 13
8   Richie Ginther Ret Ret Ret 3 13 8 2 Ret 7 10
9   Jack Brabham Ret 8 6 Ret 5 Ret 4 4 9
10   Trevor Taylor 2 Ret Ret 8 8 Ret Ret 12 Ret 6
11   Giancarlo Baghetti 4 Ret 10 5 5
12   Lorenzo Bandini 3 Ret 8 4
13   Ricardo Rodríguez Ret DNS 4 6 14 4
14   Willy Mairesse 7 Ret 4 3
15   Jo Bonnier 7 5 10 Ret 7 6 13 3
16   Innes Ireland Ret Ret Ret Ret 16 Ret 8 5 2
17   Carel Godin de Beaufort 6 DNQ 7 6 14 13 10 Ret 11 2
18   Masten Gregory Ret DNQ Ret Ret 7 12 6 1
19   Neville Lederle 6 1
  Maurice Trintignant Ret 8 7 Ret Ret Ret 0
  Jackie Lewis 8 DNQ Ret 10 Ret 0
  John Love 8 0
  Nino Vaccarella DNQ 15 9 0
  Lucien Bianchi 9 16 0
  Roger Penske 9 0
  Bruce Johnstone 9 0
  Jo Siffert DNQ 10 Ret 12 DNQ 0
  Rob Schroeder 10 0
  Ernie Pieterse 10 0
  Ian Burgess 12 11 DNQ 0
  Tony Settember 11 Ret 0
  John Campbell-Jones 11 0
  Hap Sharp 11 0
  Heini Walter 14 0
  Jay Chamberlain 15 DNQ DNQ 0
  Wolfgang Seidel NC Ret DNQ 0
  Roy Salvadori Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret DNS Ret 0
  Tony Shelly Ret DNQ DNQ 0
  Keith Greene DNS Ret DNQ 0
  Ben Pon Ret 0
  Heinz Schiller Ret 0
  Bernard Collomb Ret 0
  Timmy Mayer Ret 0
  Doug Serrurier Ret 0
  Mike Harris Ret 0
  Günther Seiffert DNQ 0
  Gerry Ashmore DNQ 0
  Ernesto Prinoth DNQ 0
  Roberto Lippi DNQ 0
  Nasif Estéfano DNQ 0
  Jim Hall DNS 0
Pos. Driver NED
 
MON
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
ITA
 
USA
 
RSA
 
Pts.
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver Second place
Bronze Third place
Green Other points position
Blue Other classified position
Not classified, finished (NC)
Purple Not classified, retired (Ret)
Red Did not qualify (DNQ)
Did not pre-qualify (DNPQ)
Black Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Race cancelled (C)
Blank Did not practice (DNP)
Excluded (EX)
Did not arrive (DNA)
Withdrawn (WD)
Did not enter (cell empty)
Text formatting Meaning
Bold Pole position
Italics Fastest lap
  • Only the best 5 results counted towards the championship. Numbers without parentheses are championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  • Italics indicate fastest lap
  • Bold indicates pole position

International Cup for F1 Manufacturers standings

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Points towards the 1962 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers were awarded on a 9–6–4–3–2–1 basis for the first six places in each race, however only the best placed car from each manufacturer was eligible to score points and only the best five results could be retained by each manufacturer.

 
Porsche placed fifth in the 1962 International Cup for F1 Manufacturers
Pos. Manufacturer NED
 
MON
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
ITA
 
USA
 
RSA
 
Pts.[a]
1   BRM 1 (6) 2 (3) (4) 1 1 (2) 1 42 (56)
2   Lotus-Climax 2 8 1 7 1 4 9 1 (5) 36 (38)
3   Cooper-Climax (5) 1 Ret 2 3 (5) 3 (3) 2 29 (37)
4   Lola-Climax Ret 4 5 5 2 2 Ret Ret Ret 19
5   Porsche 6 5 7 1 9 3 (6) 5 11 18 (19)
6   Ferrari 3 2 3 WD Ret 6 4 WD 18
7   Brabham-Climax Ret 4 4 6
8   Lotus-BRM DNQ Ret Ret Ret Ret 12 6 1
  Emeryson-Climax NC 11 Ret WD 0
  ENB-Maserati 16 0
  Gilby-BRM WD Ret DNQ 0
  LDS-Alfa Romeo Ret 0
  Cooper-Alfa Romeo Ret 0
  De Tomaso DNQ 0
  De Tomaso-OSCA DNQ 0
Pos. Manufacturer NED
 
MON
 
BEL
 
FRA
 
GBR
 
GER
 
ITA
 
USA
 
RSA
 
Pts.
  • Only the best five results counted towards the championship. Numbers without parentheses are championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.
  • Bold results counted to championship totals.

Non-championship races

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The following Formula One races which did not count towards the World Championship of Drivers or the International Cup for F1 Manufacturers, were also held in 1962.

Race name Circuit Date Winning driver Constructor Report
  V Cape Grand Prix Killarney 2 January   Trevor Taylor   Lotus-Climax Report
  IV Brussels Grand Prix Heysel 1 April   Willy Mairesse   Ferrari Report
  III Lombank Trophy Snetterton 14 April   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax Report
  XIV Lavant Cup Goodwood 23 April   Bruce McLaren   Cooper-Climax Report
  X Glover Trophy Goodwood 23 April   Graham Hill   BRM Report
  XXII Pau Grand Prix Pau 23 April   Maurice Trintignant   Lotus-Climax Report
  VII Aintree 200 Aintree 28 April   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax Report
  XV BRDC International Trophy Silverstone 12 May   Graham Hill   BRM Report
  XX Naples Grand Prix Posillipo 20 May   Willy Mairesse   Ferrari Report
  I International 2000 Guineas Mallory Park 11 June   John Surtees   Lola-Climax Report
  XIII Crystal Palace Trophy Crystal Palace 11 June   Innes Ireland   Lotus-BRM Report
  III Grand Prix de Reims Reims 1 July   Bruce McLaren   Cooper-Climax Report
  XII Solitude Grand Prix Solitudering 15 July   Dan Gurney   Porsche Report
  VIII Kanonloppet Karlskoga 12 August   Masten Gregory   Lotus-BRM Report
  I Mediterranean Grand Prix Enna-Pergusa 19 August   Lorenzo Bandini   Ferrari Report
  III Danish Grand Prix Roskilde Ring 25–26 August   Jack Brabham   Lotus-Climax Report
  IX Gold Cup Oulton Park 1 September   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax Report
  I Mexican Grand Prix Magdalena Mixhuca 4 November   Jim Clark
  Trevor Taylor
  Lotus-Climax Report
  V Rand Grand Prix Kyalami 15 December   Jim Clark   Lotus-Climax Report
  II Natal Grand Prix Westmead 22 December   Trevor Taylor   Lotus-Climax Report

Notes

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  1. ^ Only the best 5 results counted towards the championship. Numbers without parentheses are championship points; numbers in parentheses are total points scored.

References

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  1. ^ "1962 Driver Standings". Formula1.com. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  2. ^ "1962 Constructor Standings". Formula1.com. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  3. ^ "International Motorsports Hall of Fame". Archived from the original on 24 February 2001.
  4. ^ Stirling Moss Career Ending Crash on YouTube
  5. ^ Denis Jenkinson (20 May 1962). "1962 Dutch Grand Prix race report: Hill rings in the new season with debut win". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 7 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  6. ^ Denis Jenkinson (3 June 1962). "1962 Monaco Grand Prix race report: Kiwi survives hunting red shark". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 7 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  7. ^ Denis Jenkinson (17 June 1962). "1962 Belgian Grand Prix race report: A fine win for Lotus". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 10 June 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  8. ^ a b c Björklund, Bengt, ed. (October 1962). "Ferrari lämnar formel 1" [Ferrari Leaves Formula 1]. Illustrerad Motor Sport (in Swedish). No. 10. Lerum, Sweden. p. 14.
  9. ^ Denis Jenkinson (8 July 1962). "1962 French Grand Prix race report: Gurney gives Porsche its P1". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 7 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  10. ^ Denis Jenkinson (21 July 1962). "1962 British Grand Prix race report - The uncatchable Lotus and Clark". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 8 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  11. ^ Denis Jenkinson (5 August 1962). "1962 German Grand Prix race report: Hill the rain meister at the Nordschleife". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 7 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  12. ^ Denis Jenkinson (16 September 1962). "1962 Italian Grand Prix race report: Hill takes surefooted victory". Archived from the original on 7 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  13. ^ Michael Tee (7 October 1962). "1962 United States Grand Prix race report: Brits conquer the Glen". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 8 September 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
  14. ^ Michael Tee (29 December 1962). "1962 South African Grand Prix race report: Graham the champion". Motorsport Magazine. Archived from the original on 1 June 2023. Retrieved 25 April 2024.
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