Terry Griffiths

Terence Martin Griffiths, OBE (born 16 October 1947) is a retired Welsh professional snooker player and current snooker coach and pundit. In his second professional tournament, he became world champion when he won the 1979 World Snooker Championship. He was the second qualifier to win the title after Alex Higgins achieved the feat in 1972 only Shaun Murphy has done it since winning the title in 2005. Griffiths defeated Dennis Taylor by 24 frames to 16 in the final. Nine years later, in 1988, Griffiths reached the final of the competition again. He was tied with Steve Davis at 8–8, but lost the match 11–18.

Terry Griffiths
OBE
Born (1947-10-16) 16 October 1947 (age 74)
Llanelli, Carmarthenshire, Wales
Sport countryWales
NicknameGriff[1]
Professional1978–1997
Highest ranking3 (1981/82)
Tournament wins
Ranking1
Non-ranking17
World Champion1979

Griffiths reached at least the quarter-finals of the World Championship for nine consecutive years from 1984 to 1992. He also won the Masters in 1980 and the UK Championship in 1982, making him one of the players to have completed snooker's Triple Crown. He was runner-up at the Masters three times, and reached the final of the 1989 European Open where he lost the deciding frame to John Parrott.

Although he also won several other tournaments, Griffiths' determination to match his rival Davis led to him making changes in his playing technique that commentators have claimed meant that he lost his natural flair for playing. He announced his retirement from professional snooker in 1996 to become the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association's director of coaching, and developed a coaching career that has included working with leading players including Stephen Hendry, Mark Williams and Ding Junhui.

Early yearsEdit

Terence Martin Griffiths was born in Llanelli on 16 October 1947.[2][3] He gained a place at a grammar school but was expelled for truancy and then became a student at a secondary modern, where he played rugby union with future Welsh national team members Phil Bennett and Derek Quinnell.[4] Griffiths started playing snooker when he was 14. After leaving school, he worked in a coal mine, and he became the youngest winner of the Llanelli and District snooker championship when he was 16.[3][4] Griffiths won the West Wales snooker championship, and having changed his employment to become a bus conductor, had more time available to practise snooker.[4] He later worked as a postman,[5] and as an insurance salesman.[4]

At the age of 17, he won the West Wales snooker championship.[6] He compiled his first century break when he was 24, the same year that he first entered the Welsh Amateur Championship, finishing as runner up.[6] He played in the amateur home internationals fourteen times, winning twelve of his matches, and after winning the Welsh Amateur Championship in 1975, gained a place at the 1976 World Amateur Snooker Championship where he reached the quarter-finals.[6][7] Griffiths won the English Amateur Championship in 1977 and 1978 before turning professional on 1 June 1978, having been accepted as a member by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association at its meeting during the 1978 World Snooker Championship.[8] Anticipating his acceptance as a professional, Snooker Scene wrote in May 1978 that "his power screws and long potting are second to no one's ... it will not be in the least surprising, if very soon he becomes a serious challenger for Snooker's top professional titles."[9]

Early professional career 1978–1982Edit

In his first professional match, in the qualifying competition for the 1978 UK Championship, Griffiths lost 8–9 to Rex Williams after leading 8–2. Williams took a 2–1 lead, before Griffiths won the next seven frames, and Williams took the following seven. In the deciding frame, Griffiths rushed when potting the pink ball and went in off, a foul shot. Williams later potted the pink to secure victory.[10] After qualifying for the 1979 World Championship, by eliminating Bernard Bennett 9–2 (from 0–2 behind) and Jim Meadowcroft 9–6 (from 6–6),[11] Griffiths defeated the previous year's runner-up Perrie Mans 13–8 in the first round and Alex Higgins 13–12 in the quarter-finals.[12]: 73–74  After beating Eddie Charlton 19–17 in a long semi-final that finished at 1:40 am,[13] Griffiths told interviewer David Vine "I'm in the final now, you know."[14] In the final, he faced Dennis Taylor, who, having been a professional since 1973, was also playing in his first world championship final.[13] The match was close for the first four of the six sessions, and the match was level at 15–15 before Griffiths took a 17–16 lead and went on to win 24–16,[13] becoming world champion at the first attempt,[13][4] in only his second tournament as a professional.[15] He was only the second player to win the championship after playing in qualifying, after Higgins in 1972, and the first to win it at the Crucuble as a qualifier. The only other player to achieve this, as at 2021, was Shaun Murphy in 2005.[16][17]

In the following season, Griffiths reached the final of the 1979 Canadian Open, losing 16–17 to Cliff Thorburn,[18] and was part of the Welsh team that won the inaugural World Cup of snooker: Ray Reardon, Doug Mountjoy and Griffiths defeated England 14–3 in the final.[19][20] At the end of 1979, Griffiths faced John Virgo in the 1979 UK Championship final. Virgo had been penalised two frames for arriving late to a session, not having realised that the start time had been brought forward as requested by the television broadcasters, reducing his lead to 9–11. When the scores were 11–11, Griffiths offered to split the prize money. Virgo declined, and later won the match 14–13.[21][22]

Griffiths was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1980.[23] He won the 1980 Masters, defeating Alex Higgins 9–5 in front of a 2,323 spectators, a record crowd for a UK snooker event, at the Wembley Conference Centre after compiling a break of 131 to win the decisive frame.[24] It was his first appearance at the Masters,[24] and turned out to be his only win there.[18] He also won the 1980 Irish Masters, defeating Mountjoy 10–9 in the final.[25]

Defending champion at the World Championship, Griffiths lost the first seven frames against Davis in his first match, and ended the first session trailing 1–7.[26] Davis won the opening frame of the second session to extend his lead to 8–1, and had a seven frame lead again at 10–3, before Griffiths won three frames to end the session 6–10 behind.[27] In the third session, Griffiths won the first four frames to level at 10–10, with Davis then winning the next three to secure a 13–10 victory, which included a 116 break in the 22nd frame.[28] The failure of first-time world snooker champions to defend their title has become known as the "Crucible curse."[29]

Griffiths and his Wales team-mates retained the 1980 World Challenge Cup for Wales,[30] and he again won the Irish Masters in 1981 before losing to eventual winner Davis in the quarter-finals of the 1981 World Snooker Championship.[18] Griffiths lost 3–16 to Davis in the 1981 UK Championship final, the first of five finals in consecutive events contested by the pair.[12]: 96  Griffiths triumphed in two of the five, winning on the final black, 9–8 in the deciding frame of the 1982 Classic after Davis had recovered from 3–8 to 8–8.[12]: 95–96  He also won the Irish Masters, defeating Davis 9–5.[18] After Davis was unexpectedly defeated by Tony Knowles in the first round of the World Championship that year, Griffiths became the bookmakers' favourite for the title. However, he also lost in the first round, to Willie Thorne.[12]: 96  At the end of 1982, he won the UK Championship, defeating Alex Higgins 16–15 in the final.[18]

Professional career 1983 to 1989Edit

He never again won a ranking event,[31] although he won several invitational events, including the 1984 Malaysian Masters, where he topped a round robin group (Tony Meo was the runner-up);[32] the 1984 Singapore Masters, where he also topped a round robin group (Davis was the runner-up);[33] and the 1985 Hong Kong Masters, where he defeated Davis 4–2.[33]

 
Terry Griffiths Matchroom, Llanelli

The 1985–86 snooker season saw Griffiths claim the Welsh Professional Championship for the first time. He also won the 1986 Belgian Classic, where he beat Kirk Stevens 9–7 in the final.[33][34] At the 1986 World Snooker Championship, he led Joe Johnson 12–9 in their quarter-final, but Johnson claimed the next four frames, making two century breaks on the way to a 13–12 victory, and went on to win the title.[34][35][36] Two months before the championship, Griffiths had started working with coach Frank Callan, and, after eliminating Higgins in the last 16, praised Callan for helping his game, saying that "I tried to do the right things myself for three years ... Frank has knitted it all together for me. I didn't think anyone knew that much about snooker."[34] He ended the season by winning the 1986 Pontins Professional, defeating Willie Thorne in the final.[34]

He was the only player to reach the televised stages of each ranking tournament in the 1986–87 season, but did not reach the semi-finals in any of them. At the end of the season, he moved up four place in the rankings to 10th.[37] In 1987, he opened his own billiard hall, The Terry Griffiths Matchroom, in Llanelli.[23]

Griffiths took the Pot Black title in 1984 and won the Welsh Professional Championship again in 1986 and 1988. He again reached the final of the World Snooker Championship in 1988, defeating Steve Longworth, Willie Thorne, Neal Foulds and Jimmy White, to reach the final, which he lost to Davis, 11–18.[31][38] The players had been level at 8–8 after the first of two-day's play in the final, and Terry Smith of the Daily Telegraph commented after the match that "Griffiths knows he produced his best snooker since he became world champion in 1979, and still lost."[39]

The 1989 European Open was his only final of the following season.[40] Having built a 4–1 lead against John Parrott, Griffiths saw his opponent level the match at 4–4 by the end of the first session. Griffiths later led 8–7, but Parrott won the match, and his first major title, 9–8.[41]

Professional career 1989 to 1997Edit

In the 1989–90 snooker season, Griffiths reached the semi-finals of both the 1989 Asian Open and the 1989 UK Championship, and the quarter-finals of the 1990 World Snooker Championship. His only final was at the 1989 Scottish Masters, where he lost 1–10 to Stephen Hendry. At the end of the season, he dropped one place in the world rankings, to sixth.[42] In the following season, he was again runner-up to Hendry at the Scottish Masters, but did not achieve much success in ranking events, and fell from 6th to 11th place at the season's end.[43]

He moved back to the 6th ranking after the 1991–92 snooker season, during which he reached two ranking tournament semi-finals and the semi-final of the 1992 World Championship, with victories over Bob Chaperon, Neal Foulds and Peter Ebdon before losing to Stephen Hendry.[18][44] In the following season his best performance at a ranking tournament was reaching the semi-final of the 1992 Grand Prix, which he lost 6–9 to Ken Doherty, and his best showings at ranking tournaments over the next three seasons were a single quarter-final appearance in each.[18]

At the 1996 World Snooker Championship, Griffiths eliminated Jamie Burnett in a final frame decider, 10–9, in the first round, having trailed 0–6 and 5–9. In the second round, he lost to his old rival Steve Davis (whom he never defeated at the Crucible in six attempts), and then announced his retirement from the game to become the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association's Director of Coaching.[31] Griffiths retired whilst 23rd in the rankings, the first year since his debut season that he had not been in the elite top 16.[31][45] despite only entering the 1997 World Championship qualifiers in his final season as a professional.[31] Clive Everton wrote that at the time Griffiths was "the only player to retire when his standard was still in touch with the circuit's top players."[12]: 462  Griffiths won his qualifying match to play in the main tournament at the Crucible one last time, where he lost in the first round to fellow countryman and debutant Mark Williams, in another final-frame decider, 9–10. During his professional snooker career, Griffiths played a total of 999 frames at the Crucible.[46]

In their book Masters of the Baize, Luke Williams and Paul Gadsby speculated that Griffiths may have won more tournaments if he had not adjusted his playing technique to try and challenge Davis.[4] Gordon Burn reported in his 1986 book Pocket Money that Reardon felt that Griffiths had started to decline as a player from the point that he signed a management contract with Barry Hearn, Davis's manager, at the end of the 1981–82 snooker season, and that changes that Griffiths had made to his stance and cueing, losing his "natural flair."[47]: 21  Burn also noted that after Hearn took over as Griffiths's manager, "In the first year, Hearn tripled Griffiths' income and halved his work."[47]: 21  He quotes Griffiths saying "I just found it difficult to accept that there was a better player than me in the world" but that is efforts to change his way of playing, rather than meaning he was approaching Davis's standard, meant "I wasn't even getting at Steve Davis, because other players were beating me first."[47]: 22  Everton wrote about Griffiths's change of technique that "While he acquired an encyclopaedic technical knowledge in the process and maintained an admirable consistency, he could never quite recapture the flair and inspiration that had brought him the world title."[31] As a winner of the world championship, UK championship and Masters during his career, Griffiths is one of the players to have achieved the Triple Crown.[48][49]

Later careerEdit

Griffiths resigned as the WPBSA director of coaching in 1998, describing the Association as "a hopeless set-up with no one giving the staff any direction at all."[12]: 226  He has coached many top players, including Mark Williams, Marco Fu, Mark Allen, Ali Carter, Joe Perry, Barry Hawkins, Ding Junhui, Stephen Hendry and Stephen Maguire.[50][51] He has said of his coaching that "it used to be a lot of technical stuff years ago – probably 90% on the technical side. Now it's the other way about, perhaps 80–20% on the mental side."[51] He was the Director of Coaching at the South West Snooker Academy.[52] He also commentates on snooker for the BBC.[15] In 2007, Griffiths was awarded an OBE for "services to snooker".[53] In 2021, he launched "SQ", a handicapping system for snooker.[54] His son Wayne Griffiths is the head snooker coach at the Hong Kong Sports Institute and has coached three-time women's world champion Ng On-yee.[54] During his career he won over a million pounds in prize money.[55]

Performance and rankings timelineEdit

Tournament 1978/
79
1979/
80
1980/
81
1981/
82
1982/
83
1983/
84
1984/
85
1985/
86
1986/
87
1987/
88
1988/
89
1989/
90
1990/
91
1991/
92
1992/
93
1993/
94
1994/
95
1995/
96
1996/
97
Ref.
Ranking [nb 1] 8 5 3 14 9 8 8 10 6 5 5 6 11 6 8 14 15 23 [56]
Ranking tournaments
Asian Classic[nb 2] Tournament Not Held NR A QF 2R QF 2R 2R QF A [18]
Grand Prix[nb 3] Tournament Not Held QF 3R 1R QF 3R 3R QF 1R 2R QF SF 1R 2R 1R A [18]
UK Championship Non-Ranking Event 1R QF 3R QF SF SF 2R 3R 1R QF 3R 2R A [18]
German Open Tournament Not Held 1R A [18]
Welsh Open Tournament Not Held 3R 2R 1R 1R 2R A [18]
International Open[nb 4] Not Held NR QF SF 2R 3R 3R 2R 1R 2R Not Held 3R 3R 3R 1R A [18]
European Open Tournament Not Held F 1R 2R SF 2R 1R QF 2R A [18]
Thailand Open[nb 5] Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event Not Held SF 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 1R A [18]
British Open[nb 6] NH Non-Ranking Event 2R QF 3R 2R 1R 2R 3R QF 1R 1R 1R 1R A [18]
World Championship W 2R QF 1R 2R QF QF QF QF F QF QF QF SF 2R 2R 2R 2R 1R [18]
Non-ranking tournaments
Scottish Masters Not Held A SF QF QF A A F NH F F A 1R A A A A [18]
Charity Challenge Tournament Not Held SF 1R A [18]
The Masters A W F F QF F SF QF 1R QF QF 1R SF 1R 1R 1R QF WR A [18]
Seniors Pot Black Tournament Not Held F [57]
Irish Masters A W W W SF F 1R 1R SF SF QF SF 1R 1R 1R 1R A A A [18]
Pontins Professional A QF W SF RR QF W W SF A A A A A A A A A A [18]
European League[nb 7] Tournament Not Held A Not Held RR RR RR A A A A A A A A [58]
Former ranking tournaments
Canadian Masters[nb 8] Non-Ranking Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking QF Tournament Not Held [18]
Hong Kong Open[nb 9] NH Ranking Event NH 2R Tournament Not Held Ranking NH [18]
Classic NH Non-Ranking Event QF QF 1R QF QF 3R 1R 1R 3R Tournament Not Held [18]
Strachan Open Tournament Not Held 2R MR NR Not Held [18]
Former non-ranking tournaments
Champion of Champions A NH RR Tournament Not Held [59]
International Open[nb 10] Not Held QF Ranking Event Not Held Ranking Event [18]
Northern Ireland Classic Not Held SF Tournament Not Held [18]
Classic NH SF QF W 1R Ranking Event Tournament Not Held [18]
Tolly Cobbold Classic A SF A A F A Ranking Event [18][60]
UK Championship 1R F SF F W SF Ranking Event [18]
British Open[nb 11] NH RR RR F 2R 2R Ranking Event [18][61]
Singapore Masters Tournament Not Held W F Tournament Not Held [33]
KitKat Break for World Champions Tournament Not Held SF Tournament Not Held [18]
Belgian Classic Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held [33]
Australian Masters[nb 12] NH A A A A A A A SF A NH R Tournament Not Held A A NH [18]
Malaysian Masters Tournament Not Held W NH QF Tournament Not Held A [33][62]
China Masters Tournament Not Held A F Tournament Not Held A [33]
Tokyo Masters Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held [33]
Canadian Masters[nb 13] A F F Tournament Not Held QF A QF R Tournament Not Held [18]
Asian Classic[nb 14] Tournament Not Held QF Ranking Event [18]
Matchroom Professional Championship Tournament Not Held SF 1R QF Tournament Not Held [18]
London Masters Tournament Not Held QF A A Tournament Not Held [63]
International League Tournament Not Held RR Tournament Not Held [64]
Norwich Union Grand Prix Tournament Not Held SF A QF Tournament Not Held [18]
European Grand Masters Tournament Not Held QF[nb 15] Tournament Not Held [65][66]
World Masters Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held [18]
Welsh Professional Championship NH SF SF F SF SF W W SF W F QF QF Tournament Not Held [18]
Thailand Masters Tournament Not Held SF F F F Not Held Ranking 2R Ranking Event [67]
Hong Kong Challenge[nb 16] Tournament Not Held F QF W SF QF QF NH 1R 1R Tournament Not Held [18][33]
Indian Challenge Tournament Not Held 1R Tournament Not Held [68]
World Seniors Championship Tournament Not Held SF Tournament Not Held [69]
Belgian Challenge Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held [70]
Kent Classic[nb 17] Tournament Not Held QF A NH A A NH SF Tournament Not Held [71][72]
Belgian Masters Tournament Not Held QF A 1R Not Held A NH [18]
World Matchplay Tournament Not Held QF QF SF QF 1R Not Held [18]
Pot Black A RR A A A W QF 1R Tournament Not Held 1R ?? QF Not Held [73]
Performance Table Legend
#R lost in the early rounds of the tournament
(WR = Wildcard round, RR = Round robin)
QF lost in the quarter-finals SF lost in the semi-finals
F lost in the final W won the tournament A did not participate in the tournament
?? outcome not verified
NH / Not Held means an event was not held.
NR / Non-Ranking Event means an event is/was no longer a ranking event.
R / Ranking Event means an event is/was a ranking event.
  1. ^ New players on the Main Tour do not have a ranking.
  2. ^ The event was also called the Dubai Masters (1988/1989), Dubai Classic (1989/90–1994/1995) and Thailand Classic (1995/1996)
  3. ^ The event was also called the Professional Players Tournament (1982/83–1983/1984)
  4. ^ The event was also called the Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986)
  5. ^ The event was also called the Thailand Masters (1983/1984–1986/1987 & 1991/1992) and the Asian Open (1989/1990–1992/1993)
  6. ^ The event was also called the British Gold Cup (1979/1980), Yamaha Organs Trophy (1980/1981) and International Masters (1981/1982–1983/1984)
  7. ^ The event was also called the Matchroom League (1986/1987–1991/1992)
  8. ^ The event was also called the Canadian Open (1978/1979–1980/1981)
  9. ^ The event was also called the Australian Masters (1979/1980–1987/1988) and Australian Open (1994/1995)
  10. ^ The event was also called the Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986)
  11. ^ The event was also called the British Gold Cup (1979/1980), Yamaha Organs Trophy (1980/1981) and International Masters (1981/1982–1983/1984)
  12. ^ The event was also called the Hong Kong Open (1989/1990) and Australian Open (1994/1995)
  13. ^ The event was also called the Canadian Open (1978/1979–1980/1981)
  14. ^ The event was also called the Dubai Masters (1988/1989)
  15. ^ Snooker Scene reported "Bond having arrived in the semi-final in unorthodox fashion by losing 3–0 to Griffiths in the quarter-finals."
  16. ^ The event was also called the Hong Kong Masters (1983/1984–1988/1989)
  17. ^ The event was also called the Kent Cup (1986/1987–1987/1988 & 1989/90–1990/91)

Career finalsEdit

Sources for the ranking and ron-ranking final results can be found in the Performance timeline section above.

Ranking finals: 3 (1 title, 2 runners-up)Edit

Legend
World Championship (1–1)
Other (0–1)
Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Winner 1. 1979 World Championship   Dennis Taylor 24–16
Runner-up 1. 1988 World Championship   Steve Davis 11–18
Runner-up 2. 1989 European Open   John Parrott 8–9

Non-ranking finals: 40 (17 titles, 23 runners-up)Edit

Legend
UK Championship (1–2) [nb 1]
The Masters (1–3)
Other (15–19)
Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score
Runner-up 1. 1979 Canadian Open   Cliff Thorburn 16–17
Runner-up 2. 1979 UK Championship   John Virgo 13–14
Winner 1. 1980 The Masters   Alex Higgins 9–5
Winner 2. 1980 Irish Masters   Doug Mountjoy 10–9
Runner-up 3. 1980 Canadian Open (2)   Cliff Thorburn 10–17
Runner-up 4. 1981 The Masters   Alex Higgins 6–9
Winner 3. 1981 Irish Masters (2)   Ray Reardon 9–7
Winner 4. 1981 Pontins Professional   Willie Thorne 9–8
Runner-up 5. 1981 UK Championship (2)   Steve Davis 3–16
Winner 5. 1982 The Classic   Steve Davis 9–8
Runner-up 6. 1982 The Masters (2)   Steve Davis 5–9
Runner-up 7. 1982 Welsh Professional Championship   Doug Mountjoy 8–9
Runner-up 8. 1982 International Masters   Steve Davis 7–9
Winner 6. 1982 Irish Masters (3)   Steve Davis 9–5
Winner 7. 1982 UK Championship   Alex Higgins 16–15
Runner-up 9. 1983 Tolly Cobbold Classic   Steve Davis 5–7
Runner-up 10. 1983 Hong Kong Masters   Doug Mountjoy 3–4
Winner 8. 1984 Pot Black   John Spencer 2–1
Runner-up 11. 1984 The Masters (3)   Jimmy White 5–9
Runner-up 12. 1984 Irish Masters   Steve Davis 1–9
Runner-up 13. 1984 Thailand Masters   Jimmy White 3–4
Winner 9. 1984 Malaysian Masters   Tony Meo Round-robin [nb 2]
Winner 10. 1984 Singapore Masters   Steve Davis Round-robin [nb 2]
Winner 11. 1985 Welsh Professional Championship   Doug Mountjoy 9–4
Winner 12. 1985 Pontins Professional (2)   John Spencer 9–7
Winner 13. 1985 Hong Kong Masters   Steve Davis 4–2
Runner-up 14. 1985 Thailand Masters (2)   Dennis Taylor 0–4
Runner-up 15. 1985 Singapore Masters   Steve Davis 2–4
Winner 14. 1986 Belgian Classic   Kirk Stevens 9–7
Winner 15. 1986 Welsh Professional Championship (2)   Doug Mountjoy 9–3
Winner 16. 1986 Pontins Professional (3)   Willie Thorne 9–6
Runner-up 16. 1986 Thailand Masters (3)   James Wattana 1–2
Runner-up 17. 1986 China Masters   Steve Davis 0–3
Runner-up 18. 1987 Tokyo Masters   Dennis Taylor 3–6
Runner-up 19. 1987 Scottish Masters   Joe Johnson 7–9
Winner 17. 1988 Welsh Professional Championship (3)   Wayne Jones 9–3
Runner-up 20. 1989 Welsh Professional Championship (2)   Doug Mountjoy 6–9
Runner-up 21. 1989 Scottish Masters (2)   Stephen Hendry 1–10
Runner-up 22. 1990 Scottish Masters (3)   Stephen Hendry 6–10
Runner-up 23. 1997 Seniors Pot Black   Joe Johnson 0–2

Team finals: 5 (2 titles, 3 runners-up)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Team/partner Opponent(s) in the final Score Ref.
Winner 1. 1979 World Challenge Cup   Wales   England 14–3 [30]
Winner 2. 1980 World Challenge Cup (2)   Wales   Canada 8–5 [30]
Runner-up 1. 1981 World Team Classic   Wales   England 3–4 [30]
Runner-up 2. 1982 World Doubles Championship   Doug Mountjoy   Steve Davis
  Tony Meo
2–13 [74]
Runner-up 3. 1983 World Team Classic (2)   Wales   England 2–4 [30]

Pro-am finals: 2 (1 title, 1 runner-up)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Runner-up 1. 1977 Pontins Spring Open   Alex Higgins 4–7 [75]: 100 
Winner 1. 1983 Pontins Spring Open   Ray Reardon 7–3 [75]: 100 

Amateur finals: 4 (3 titles, 1 runner-up)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Runner-up 1. 1972 Welsh Amateur Championship   Geoff Thomas 2–6 [76]
Winner 1. 1975 Welsh Amateur Championship   Geoff Thomas 8–7 [4]
Winner 2. 1977 English Amateur Championship   Sid Hood 13–3 [75]: 37 
Winner 3. 1978 English Amateur Championship (2)   Joe Johnson 13–6 [75]: 37 

PublicationsEdit

Year Title Authors Publisher ISBN
1981 Championship snooker Terry Griffiths with Clive Everton Queen Anne Press, London ISBN 0362005435
1984 Complete snooker Terry Griffiths with Julian Worthington Pelham, London ISBN 0720715024
1989 Griff : the autobiography of Terry Griffiths Terry Griffiths with Julian Worthington Pelham, London ISBN 0720718864

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The UK Championship did not become a ranking event until 1984
  2. ^ a b No play-off. Winner decided via a league format.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Three Top Tips from the Master Snooker Coach "Griff" Terry Griffiths…". Snooker Zone. Archived from the original on 14 January 2021. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  2. ^ "The Queen's birthday honours". The Times. 16 June 2007. p. 74. Terence Martin Griffiths services to snooker
  3. ^ a b Morrison, Ian (1988). Hamlyn Who's Who in Snooker. London: Hamlyn. pp. 39–42. ISBN 0600557138.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Williams, Luke; Gadsby, Paul (2005). Masters of the Baize. Edinburgh: Mainstream. pp. 95–102. ISBN 1840188723.
  5. ^ "1979: Griffiths creates miracle". BBC. 12 April 2002. Archived from the original on 4 April 2003. Retrieved 15 July 2008.
  6. ^ a b c Everton, Clive (1981). The Guinness Book of Snooker. Enfield: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. p. 70. ISBN 0851122302.
  7. ^ Everton, Clive (1981). The Guinness Book of Snooker. Enfield: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. pp. 150–153. ISBN 0851122302.
  8. ^ "New professionals". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. June 1978. p. 27.
  9. ^ "Every inch a pro". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. May 1978. p. 3.
  10. ^ "United Kingdom professional championship qualifying section". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. October 1978. pp. 9–10.
  11. ^ "Embassy world professional championship". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. May 1979. pp. 7–12.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Everton, Clive (2012). Black farce and cue ball wizards. Edinburgh: Maintream. ISBN 9781780575681.
  13. ^ a b c d Morrison, Ian (1989). Snooker: records, facts and champions. Enfield: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. pp. 34–35. ISBN 0851123643.
  14. ^ "Hall of Fame – Terry Griffiths". BBC. Archived from the original on 6 March 2005. Retrieved 14 July 2008.
  15. ^ a b "Terry Griffiths". World Snooker Tour. Archived from the original on 24 February 2021. Retrieved 18 May 2021.
  16. ^ Sutcliffe, Steve (1 May 2021). "World Snooker Championship: Mark Selby and Shaun Murphy to meet in final". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  17. ^ Chowdhury, Saj (2 May 2005). "Qualifier Murphy wins world title". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 July 2021.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq Hayton, Eric; Dee, John (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker: The Complete Record & History. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. pp. 480–483. ISBN 978-0954854904.
  19. ^ Everton, Clive (December 1979). "A successful experiment". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. p. 3.
  20. ^ "State Express world cup". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. December 1979. pp. 5–9.
  21. ^ Goodman, Alex (4 December 1979). "It's time sportmen took their cue from Terry". Newcastle Evening Chronicle. p. 43.
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External linksEdit