Anthony Christian Meo (born 4 October 1959) is a retired English snooker player. He won the 1989 British Open by defeating Dean Reynolds 13–6 in the final, and was runner-up to Steve Davis at the 1984 Classic. He won four World Doubles Championship titles, partnering Davis, and the 1983 World Team Classic representing England alongside Davis and Tony Knowles.

Tony Meo
Born (1959-10-04) 4 October 1959 (age 62)
Tooting, London
Sport country England
Nickname
  • The Cat
  • Meo, Meo
Professional1979–1997
Highest ranking10 (1984–1986)
Maximum breaks1
Tournament wins
Ranking1
Non-ranking7

He played snooker together with his schoolfriend Jimmy White as a teenager. Aged seventeen, Meo became the then-youngest person known to have made an unofficial maximum break of 147. He won the British under-19 title in 1978, as well as other junior titles. He turned professional in 1979, and won the 1981 Australian Masters, 1983 Thailand Masters and 1985 Australian Masters. He reached the final of the 1984 Lada Classic but lost in the deciding frame. He took the 1986 English Professional Championship title, and retained it in 1987. He made a break of 147 in his 1988 Matchroom League match against Stephen Hendry, and won the 1990 International League.

He retired from professional play after the 1996–97 snooker season and became a wrist watch consultant. In 1986, Meo was one of five players under Barry Hearn's management (along with Davis, Terry Griffiths, Willie Thorne and Dennis Taylor) who appeared on "Snooker Loopy", a hit single about the game recorded with Chas & Dave.

Early lifeEdit

Anthony Christian Meo was born on 4 October 1959 in Tooting, London,[1][2] and started playing snooker aged 13.[3] He was a schoolfriend of Jimmy White at Ernest Bevin Comprehensive, and the pair regularly skipped school to play snooker together.[3][4] When he was 15 (and White was 13), they were approached by "Dodgy" Bob Davis who arranged money matches for them and became their manager.[5] The players later signed to be managed, alongside the leading London amateur Patsy Fagan, by Henry West.[3] At 17, Meo became the then-youngest person known to have made an unofficial maximum break of 147.[6]

Amateur careerEdit

Meo defeated White in the final to win the 1977 Pontins Junior title as well as taking the Warners Pro-Am title by winning against professional Doug Mountjoy 5–4 in the final.[3] Meo took the British under-19 title in 1978 with a 3–1 victory against defending champion Ian Williamson in the final.[7] At the 1978 Canadian Open, he achieved the most notable win of his career to that point by eliminating Alex Higgins in the semi-final, and led 10–6 in the final against Cliff Thorburn before losing the match 15–17.[3] He won a second Warners Open title in 1979, 5–2 against White in the final.[8]

Professional careerEdit

Meo turned professional in June 1979.[3] At the 1979 Canadian Open he was seeded into the last 16, where he lost 7–9 to Jim Wych.[9] He eliminated David Taylor from the 1979 UK Championship 9–7, and then lost to the eventual champion John Virgo 6–9 in the following round.[10] He made his world championship debut at the 1980 World Snooker Championship, after progressing past Jimmy van Rensberg and Pat Houlihan (both 9–1) in qualifying. Facing Higgins, Meo was ahead after their first session, and at 9–8 was a frame away from winning before Higgins took the last two frames with breaks of 77 and 62 to claim victory.[11]

At the 1980 UK Championship, Meo eliminated defending champion Virgo 9–1 before losing to Steve Davis in the quarter-finals.[6] The 1981 English Professional Championship saw Meo eliminate Virgo, Graham Miles and Willie Thorne to reach the final.[12] Meo finished as runner-up, losing 3–9 to Davis.[13] Meo recorded his third win against Virgo in the season with a 10–6 win at the 1981 World Snooker Championship, making a break of 134 during the match.[14] In the second round, Meo finished his first session with Terry Griffiths at 4–4, but only won two of the next eleven frames, with Griffiths taking the match 13–6.[15]

At the start of the 1981–82 snooker season, Meo won the 1981 Australian Masters, a short-format competition that saw two groups each of four professional players play one-frame round-robin matches, with the group winners then playing the final over three frames.[16][17] He lost 3–9 to Griffiths in the semi-finals at the 1981 UK Championship after eliminating both Higgins and Thorburn.[12] Davis and Meo won the 1982 World Doubles Championship.[18] Meo also reached the semi-finals of the 1982 Masters.[12] The 1982 UK Championship was a repeat of 1981 in that he reached the semi-finals and lost to Griffiths, this time 7–9.[12] He reached the World Championship quarter-finals for the first time at the 1983 tournament, and finished the season by winning the 1983 Pontins Brean Sands tournament, with a 9–7 final victory against Silvino Francisco.[12]

 
Steve Davis (pictured in 2014) and Meo won four World Doubles Championships together.

In the 1983–84 snooker season, he won the 1983 Thailand Masters,[19] and was a semi-finalist at the 1983 Professional Players Tournament.[12] In December 1983, Davis and Meo retained the World Doubles Championship.[18] The following month, they faced each other in the final of the Lada Classic. Meo had reached the final by eliminating Rex Williams 5–3, Kirk Stevens 5–2 and Mark Wildman 5–3. After losing the first two frames in the final, Meo established a 4–2 lead, which was reduced to 4–3 after Davis won the concluding frame of the first session with a 122 clearance. In the second session, Davis took the first four frames, compiling six breaks of 35 or more. Meo claimed the next four frames, to require just one more frame at 8–7, having recovered from more than 40 points behind in both the 12th and 15th frames. Davis won the 16th frame with a break of 84 to force a deciding frame. Davis built a lead of 38 points, but Meo recovered to 12 points behind with a break of 26. Meo only needed to clear the colours to win the title, but missed potting the yellow ball after being distracted by a shout of "Come on, Tony" from a spectator. Davis went on to win the frame and match.[6][20]

The non-ranking 1984 Malaysian Masters was the only final that Meo reached in 1984–85 snooker season, but he retained his ranking of tenth for 1985–86.[21][22] He won the 1985 Australian Masters by defeating John Campbell 7–2 in the final,[12] and the 1986 English Professional Championship. In the latter, he defeated Davis 9–7 in the semi-finals, his first victory over Davis in their eleven professional matches against each other. In the final, Meo led Neal Foulds 3–1, but the first session finished with the pair level at 3–3. Meo was a frame ahead at 4–3 and 5–4, with Foulds then taking the next two frames to lead for the first time in the match at 6–5. Meo added the 12th frame, but Foulds moved ahead again by claiming the 13th. Meo won the next three frames for a 9–7 victory, finishing with a break of 94 in the 16th frame.[23]

The 1987 English Professional Championship saw him retain the title by defeating Les Dodd 9–5 in the final, but his ranking tournament performances in the 1986–87 snooker season meant he slipped from 11th to 20th place in the rankings, and his results in the following season saw him fall to 31st in the 1988/1989 rankings.[24] He compiled a maximum break of 147 in his 1988 Matchroom League match against Stephen Hendry.[25]

In the 1988–89 snooker season, he reached the quarter-finals of the 1988 International Open. At the 1989 British Open he eliminated Colin Roscoe 5–3, then the defending champion Hendry and Peter Francisco, each by the same scoreline. In the semi-final against Mike Hallett, Meo was two frames behind with three to play at 6–8. He won the 15th frame by a single point after requiring two snookers, then added the next two frames to win 9–8. In the final, he played Dean Reynolds, and won each of the first two sessions 5–2, thus leading 10–4 by the third session. Reynolds reduced his deficit to 6–10, but Meo won the next three frames to claim victory at 13–6 and achieve his first ranking title victory. Before the tournament, he had been rated as a 200–1 outsider to win.[26] In the post-match speeches, Reynolds complained that he had been "totally bored" by Meo's cautious style of play. Meo acknowledged that "It wasn't very spectacular" and added that he felt that it was "the best tactical snooker" that he had ever player.[27]

Meo was a semi-finalist at the World Championship, losing 7–16 to John Parrott. His performances in ranking tournaments led to him moving up from 31st place to 14th in the rankings for the following season, during which he won the round-robin 1990 International League by winning four of his five matches, and drawing the other one.[28][29] However, in the following years, he failed to reach as far as the quarter-finals in any ranking tournament, and his ranking fell one place to 15th, then out of the top 32.[12][30] Meo was ranked 160th after the 1996–97 snooker season, but did not participate in any further tournaments in the following seasons.[31] He became a wrist watch consultant.[32]

In 1982, Meo signed up to be managed by Barry Hearn, Davis's manager.[6] With Davis, Meo won four World Doubles titles, and was also part of the victorious England team at the 1983 World Team Classic. In 1986, Meo was one of five players under Hearn's management (along with Davis, Griffiths, Thorne and Dennis Taylor) who appeared on "Snooker Loopy", a hit single about the game recorded with Chas & Dave.[2] He was nicknamed "The Cat" and "Meo, Meo".[2] The highest ranking that he attained was tenth.[2]

Personal lifeEdit

By 1981, Meo had married Denise,[33] and in 1991 they had their fourth child.[34] After retiring from snooker in 1997, Meo managed a wristwatch and jewellery store in Hatton Garden.[32][2]

Performance and rankings timelineEdit

Performance Table Legend
LQ lost in the qualifying draw #R lost in the early rounds of the tournament
(WR = Wildcard round, RR = Round robin)
QF lost in the quarter-finals
SF lost in the semi-finals F lost in the final W won the tournament
DNQ did not qualify for the tournament A did not participate in the tournament WD withdrew from the tournament
NH / Not Held means an event was not held.
NR / Non-Ranking Event means an event is/was no longer a ranking event.
R / Ranking Event means an event is/was a ranking event.
Tournament 1978/
79
1979/
80
1980/
81
1981/
82
1982/
83
1983/
84
1984/
85
1985/
86
1986/
87
1987/
88
1988/
89
1989/
90
1990/
91
1991/
92
1992/
93
1993/
94
1994/
95
1995/
96
1996/
97
Ref.
Ranking [nb 1] [nb 1] [nb 2] 18 24 15 10 10 11 20 31 14 15 34 38 51 69 75 75 [30]
Ranking tournaments
Asian Classic[nb 3] Tournament Not Held NR A 1R 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ [12]
Grand Prix[nb 4] Tournament Not Held 3R SF 1R 3R QF 1R 2R 2R 1R 1R LQ 1R LQ LQ LQ [12]
UK Championship Non-Ranking Event 2R 3R 2R 2R 1R 1R 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ 1R LQ [12]
German Open Tournament Not Held LQ WD [12]
Welsh Open Tournament Not Held 2R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ [12]
International Open[nb 5] Not Held NR LQ 1R 2R 2R 1R 2R QF 1R Not Held 1R LQ LQ LQ LQ [12]
European Open Tournament Not Held 1R 1R 2R LQ 1R LQ LQ LQ WD [12]
Thailand Open[nb 6] Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking Event Not Held 2R 1R 2R 1R LQ LQ LQ WD [12]
British Open[nb 7] NH Non-Ranking Event QF QF 1R 1R W 2R 3R LQ 1R 1R LQ LQ WD [12]
World Championship A 1R 2R 1R QF 1R 2R 1R 1R LQ SF 2R 2R LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ LQ [12]
Non-ranking tournaments
Scottish Masters Not Held A A QF A A A A NH A A A A A A A A [12]
The Masters A A A SF 1R 1R QF 1R SF A A 1R QF WD LQ LQ A A A [12]
Irish Masters A A A QF QF QF 1R QF QF A A A A A A A A A A [12]
Pontins Professional A A A A A A A A QF SF A A A A A A A A A [12]
European League[nb 8] Tournament Not Held A Not Held RR RR RR RR RR RR A A A A A [35]
Former ranking tournaments
Canadian Masters[nb 9] Non-Ranking Tournament Not Held Non-Ranking LQ Tournament Not Held [12]
Hong Kong Open[nb 10] NH Ranking Event NH 2R Tournament Not Held Ranking NH [12]
Classic NH Non-Ranking Event F 1R 3R 3R 2R 2R 2R 1R LQ Tournament Not Held [12]
Strachan Open Tournament Not Held 3R MR NR Not Held [12]
Former non-ranking tournaments
Canadian Masters[nb 11] F 2R QF Tournament Not Held A A A R Tournament Not Held [12][9]
International Open[nb 12] Not Held 1R Ranking Event Not Held Ranking Event [12]
Pontins Brean Sands Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held [12]
UK Championship A 2R QF SF SF QF Ranking Event [12]
British Open[nb 13] NH SF LQ RR RR LQ Ranking Event [12][36]
Tolly Cobbold Classic A A A QF A QF Tournament Not Held [12][37]
New Zealand Masters Tournament Not Held 1R Not Held A A Tournament Not Held [38]
Thailand Open[nb 14] Tournament Not Held W RR RR A Not Held Ranking Event [39]
Singapore Masters Tournament Not Held RR[nb 15] RR Tournament Not Held [40][41]
Pot Black A A A A A 1R A 1R Tournament Not Held A A A Not Held [42][43]
Australian Masters[nb 16] NH A A W SF QF SF W QF A NH R Tournament Not Held A A NH [12][16][44]
Malaysian Masters Tournament Not Held F NH QF Tournament Not Held A [45][46]
Kent Cup Tournament Not Held QF A NH A A NH A Tournament Not Held [47]
Tokyo Masters Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held [48]
Hong Kong Masters Tournament Not Held SF SF SF QF A QF NH A A Tournament Not Held [12][49]
Dubai Masters[nb 17] Tournament Not Held SF Ranking Event [12]
Matchroom Professional Championship Tournament Not Held 1R 1R QF Tournament Not Held [12][50]
Norwich Union Grand Prix Tournament Not Held RR A A Tournament Not Held [51]
English Professional Championship Not Held F Not Held SF W W QF 1R Tournament Not Held [12]
World Matchplay Tournament Not Held A 1R A A A Tournament Not Held [12]
International League Tournament Not Held W Tournament Not Held [52]
London Masters Tournament Not Held A SF A Tournament Not Held [53]
Shoot-Out Tournament Not Held 1R Tournament Not Held [54]
World Masters Tournament Not Held 3R Tournament Not Held [12]

Performance and rankings timeline notes

  1. ^ a b He was an amateur.
  2. ^ New players on the Main Tour do not have a ranking.
  3. ^ The event was also called the Dubai Masters (1988/1989), Dubai Classic (1989/90–1994/1995) and Thailand Classic (1995/1996)
  4. ^ The event was also called the Professional Players Tournament (1982/83–1983/1984)
  5. ^ The event was also called the Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986)
  6. ^ The event was also called the Thailand Masters (1983/1984–1986/1987 & 1991/1992) and the Asian Open (1989/1990–1992/1993)
  7. ^ The event was also called the British Gold Cup (1979/1980), Yamaha Organs Trophy (1980/1981) and International Masters (1981/1982–1983/1984)
  8. ^ The event was also called the Professional Snooker League (1983/1984) and the Matchroom League (1986/1987–1991/1992)
  9. ^ The event was also called the Canadian Open (1978/1979–1980/1981)
  10. ^ The event was also called the Australian Masters (1979/1980–1987/1988) and Australian Open (1994/1995)
  11. ^ The event was also called the Canadian Open (1978/1979–1980/1981)
  12. ^ The event was also called the Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986)
  13. ^ The event was also called the British Gold Cup (1979/1980), Yamaha Organs Trophy (1980/1981) and International Masters (1981/1982–1983/1984)
  14. ^ The event was also called the Thailand Masters (1983/1984–1986/1987 & 1991/1992) and the Asian Open (1989/1990–1992/1993)
  15. ^ Tournament was a 5 player round-robin. Meo did not finish in the top two places.
  16. ^ The event was also called the Hong Kong Open (1989/1990) and Australian Open (1994/1995)
  17. ^ The event was also called the Dubai Classic (1989/90–1994/1995), Thailand Classic (1995/1996), and Asian Classic (1996/1997)

Career finalsEdit

Ranking finals: 2 (1 title)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Runner-up 1. 1984 The Classic   Steve Davis (ENG) 8–9 [12]
Winner 1. 1989 British Open   Dean Reynolds (ENG) 13–6 [12]

Non-ranking finals: 10 (7 titles)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Runner-up 1. 1978 Canadian Open   Cliff Thorburn (CAN) 15–17 [12]
Runner-up 2. 1981 English Professional Championship   Steve Davis (ENG) 3–9 [12]
Winner 1. 1981 Australian Masters Aggregate Score [16]
Winner 2. 1983 Pontins Brean Sands   Silvino Francisco (RSA) 9–7 [12]
Winner 3. 1983 Thailand Masters   Steve Davis (ENG) 2–1 [12]
Runner-up 3. 1984 Malaysian Masters   Terry Griffiths (WAL) Round-Robin [45]
Winner 4. 1985 Australian Masters (2)   John Campbell (AUS) 7–2 [12]
Winner 5. 1986 English Professional Championship   Neal Foulds (ENG) 9–7 [12]
Winner 6. 1987 English Professional Championship (2)   Les Dodd (ENG) 9–5 [12]
Winner 7. 1990 Matchroom International League   Jimmy White (ENG) Round-Robin [52]

Team finals: 6 (5 titles)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Team/partner Opponent(s) in the final Score Ref.
Winner 1. 1982 World Doubles Championship   Steve Davis (ENG)   Terry Griffiths (WAL)
  Doug Mountjoy (WAL)
13–2 [55]
Winner 2. 1983 World Team Classic   England   Wales 4–2 [56]
Winner 3. 1983 World Doubles Championship (2)   Steve Davis (ENG)   Tony Knowles (ENG)
  Jimmy White (ENG)
10–2 [55]
Runner-up 1. 1985 World Cup   England A   All-Ireland 7–9 [56]
Winner 4. 1985 World Doubles Championship (3)   Steve Davis (ENG)   Tony Jones (ENG)
  Ray Reardon (WAL)
12–5 [55]
Winner 5. 1986 World Doubles Championship (4)   Steve Davis (ENG)   Mike Hallett (ENG)
  Stephen Hendry (SCO)
12–3 [55]

Pro-am finals: 1Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Runner-up 1. 1978 Pontins Spring Open   Steve Davis (ENG) 6–7 [57]

Amateur finals: 1 (1 title)Edit

Outcome No. Year Championship Opponent in the final Score Ref.
Winner 1. 1978 British Under-19 Championship   Ian Williamson (ENG) 3–1 [7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Smith 1989, pp. 114, Clyde, Alexander. "Tony Meo".
  2. ^ a b c d e "Then and Now: Tony Meo". Yahoo! Eurosport. 6 May 2010. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 16 March 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Morrison 1987, p. 79.
  4. ^ "Player Profile: Tony Meo". Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 9 January 2008. Retrieved 30 December 2018.
  5. ^ Everton, Clive (2012). Black farce and cue ball wizards. Edinburgh: Mainstream. p. 93. ISBN 978-1-78057568-1.
  6. ^ a b c d Morrison 1988, pp. 71–72.
  7. ^ a b "Meo foils Williamson hat-trick". Snooker Scene. Halesowen. May 1978. p. 11.
  8. ^ Morrison 1987, p. 147.
  9. ^ a b "Round by round at the C.N.E. International". Snooker Scene. Halesowen. October 1979. pp. 11–17.
  10. ^ Hayton & Dee 2004, p. 147.
  11. ^ "Tony Meo at the World Championship". Snooker Database. Archived from the original on 5 May 2014. Retrieved 10 June 2012.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av Hayton & Dee 2004, pp. 706–709.
  13. ^ Everton, Clive (17 March 1981). "TV showcase for young ones". The Guardian. p. 21.
  14. ^ Everton, Clive (11 April 1981). "Determined Davis carries on". The Guardian. p. 26.
  15. ^ Everton, Clive (13 April 1981). "Calm Davis clears the Higgins hurdle". The Guardian. London. p. 9.
  16. ^ a b c Morrison 1987, pp. 79–80.
  17. ^ "Sometimes even the stars of the game can't take a trick". The Sydney Morning Herald. 25 June 1981. p. 34.
  18. ^ a b Hale, Janice (1987). Rothmans Snooker Yearbook 1987–88. Aylesbury: Queen Anne Press. pp. 224–225. ISBN 0-35614690-1.
  19. ^ "1983 Thailand Masters Results". Snooker Database. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  20. ^ Everton, Clive; Hale, Janice (February 1984). "Lada Classic". Snooker Scene. pp. 5–30.
  21. ^ Everton 1985, pp. 14–15.
  22. ^ "How they stand: official world rankings 1985". Snooker Scene. Everton's News Agency. June 1984. pp. 18–19.
  23. ^ "Tolly Cobbold English Professional Championship: seeds fail before televised phase". Snooker Scene. Everton's News Agency. March 1986. pp. 14–17.
  24. ^ Smith, Terry, ed. (1988). Benson and Hedges Snooker Year (5th ed.). Aylesbury: Pelham Books. ISBN 0-72071830-9.
  25. ^ "Premier/Matchroom League, Matchroom Championship League". Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 23 January 2018.
  26. ^ Everton, Hale & Dee 1989, pp. 19–23.
  27. ^ Everton, Hale & Dee 1989, p. 23.
  28. ^ Smith 1989, pp. 42.
  29. ^ "Tony Meo wins Matchroom international league". Snooker Scene. Halesowen. July 1990. p. 34.
  30. ^ a b "Ranking History". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 19 December 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
    "Official world rankings 1991–92". Snooker Scene. June 1992. pp. 24–25.
    "Official world rankings". Snooker Scene. June 1994. pp. 18–20.
    "WPBSA world rankings". Snooker Scene. June 1997. pp. 28–30.
  31. ^ "WPBSA world rankings". Snooker Scene. June 1997. pp. 28–30.
  32. ^ a b Lee, Roger (August 2009). "Where are they now?". Snooker Scene. Halesowen. pp. 16–17.
  33. ^ "Testing time for Tony". Daily Mirror. 10 December 1981. p. 27.
  34. ^ "'Del boy' Meo wins with ease". Dundee Courier. 6 February 1991. p. 14.
  35. ^ "Davis halfway to £150,000 Jackpot". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. July 1987. p. 12.
    "Second league title for Davis". Snooker Scene. Birmingham. June 1988. p. 19.
    "International division for Matchroom league". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. June 1989. p. 24.
    "Hendry beats Davis to take second place". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. July 1990. p. 8.
    "Hendry finishes top of the league". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. July 1991. pp. 5–6.
    "Maximums for Parrott and Hendry". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. June 1991. p. 34.
  36. ^ "Success story: the British gold cup". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. April 1980. pp. 5–7.
  37. ^ "1982 Tolly Cobbold Classic Results Grid". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 9 December 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  38. ^ "1984 New Zealand Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 11 January 2021. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  39. ^ "1983 Thailand Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
    "1984 Thailand Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 July 2021. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
    "1985 Thailand Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 July 2021. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  40. ^ "Stars appear in far East". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. October 1984. p. 9.
  41. ^ "1985 Singapore Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  42. ^ "1984 Pot Black Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  43. ^ "1986 Pot Black Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 5 January 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  44. ^ Lowe, Ted (September 1982). "Ted Lowe reports on Australia's Winfield Masters". Cue World. Sheffield: Transworld Snooker. pp. 9–10.
  45. ^ a b "Other Non-Ranking and Invitational Events". Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 5 November 2020.
  46. ^ "Wattana's Thailand triumph". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. October 1986. p. 9.
  47. ^ "1987 Kent Cup Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 20 July 2021. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  48. ^ "1987 Tokyo Masters Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 8 February 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  49. ^ "1983 Hong Kong Masters". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
    "1984 Hong Kong Masters". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
    "1985 Hong Kong Masters". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 March 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
    Smith 1989, p. 134
  50. ^ "1987 Matchroom Professional Championship Results". snookerdatabase.co.uk. Archived from the original on 17 June 2020. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  51. ^ Hayton & Dee 2004, p. 157.
  52. ^ a b "Tony Meo wins Matchroom international league". Snooker Scene. Birmingham: Everton's News Agency. July 1990. p. 34.
  53. ^ "1990 London Masters Results Grid". Snooker Database. Archived from the original on 10 December 2018. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  54. ^ "International one-frame shoot-out". Snooker Scene. Everton's News Agency. November 1990. pp. 6–7.
  55. ^ a b c d Morrison 1987, p. 54.
  56. ^ a b Morrison 1987, p. 143.
  57. ^ "Steve Davis and Tony Meo play great Pontins final". Snooker Scene. Halesowen. June 1978. p. 19.

BibliographyEdit

  • Everton, Clive (1985). Snooker: The Records. Enfield: Guinness Superlatives. ISBN 0-85112448-8.
  • Everton, Clive; Hale, Janice; Dee, John (April 1989). "How the favourites lost, how the outsider won". Snooker Scene. Everton's News Agency. pp. 19–23.
  • Hayton, Eric; Dee, John (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker: The Complete Record & History. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. ISBN 978-0-95485490-4.
  • Morrison, Ian (1987). The Hamlyn Encyclopedia of Snooker - revised edition. Twickenham: Hamlyn Publishing Group. ISBN 0-60055604-2.
  • Morrison, Ian (1988). Hamlyn Who's Who in Snooker. London: Hamlyn. ISBN 0-60055713-8.
  • Smith, Terry, ed. (1989). Benson and Hedges Snooker Year (6th ed.). Aylesbury: Pelham Books. ISBN 0-72071944-5.

External linksEdit