Snooker Scene

Snooker Scene is a monthly magazine about snooker and other cue sports. It was established in 1972 from the amalgamation of the Billiards and Snooker Control Council's Billiards and Snooker and World Snooker published by Clive Everton.

Snooker Scene
Snooker Scene logo.jpg
EditorClive Everton
Assistant EditorDavid Hendon
Chief ReporterPhil Yates
Staff writersMarcus Stead
FounderClive Everton
Year founded1972
CompanySnooker Scene Ltd.
CountryUnited Kingdom
Based inStourbridge
LanguageEnglish

HistoryEdit

Everton had been the editor of Billiards and Snooker from the December 1966 issue[1] until the February 1971 issue when he was succeeded by Doug Organ.[2][3] According to Everton, he was sacked at the instigation of Jack Karnehm, the Chairman of the Billiards and Snooker Control Council (as the Billiards Association and Control Council had renamed itself) for "giving professionals publicity" by including picture of four professional players on the cover of Billiards and Snooker at a time when the Billiards and Snooker Control Council and the professional players were in dispute over the World Billiards Championship. This dispute led to the Professional Billiards Players Association renaming itself as the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association (WPBSA) and splitting from the Billiards and Snooker Control Council (B&SCC). Following his sacking, Everton established his own magazine, World Snooker,[4]: 16–17 : 44–45  which printed and sold 3,000 copies of its first issue published in January 1971.[5]

In 1972, the B&SCC approached Everton to take over Billiards and Snooker and paid him £1,000 to do so. Everton merged Billiards and Snooker and World Snooker into Snooker Scene, which published its first issue in April 1972, priced at 12p and featuring a report on the 1972 World Snooker Championship.[6]

The magazine has sometimes featured criticisms of the WPBSA which have led to legal disputes.[7][8][9][10]

Snooker Scene was originally published by Everton's News Agency[6] and is now published by Snooker Scene Ltd.[11] The magazine purchased and absorbed two other periodicals. Cue World was acquired in 1989, and Pot Black was purchased from the WPBSA in 1999. Janice Hale who joined Everton's News Agency in 1972 served as assistant editor, before leaving in 1992. The Deputy Editor is David Hendon, and the Chief Reporter is Phil Yates, with additional reporting coming from Marcus Stead.[10][12][11][13] The magazine was based at Halesowen for 14 years before moving to Stourbridge in late 2020.[14]

Everton has said of Snooker Scene: "I had started this as a simple journal of record of what was happening on the table, but it became a crusading vehicle … Taking Wisden and Private Eye as our models we sometimes made our point through hard reporting, sometimes through satire."[4]: 22 

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Phillips, Harold (December 1966). "Editor with drive". Billiards and Snooker. London: Billiards Association and Control Council. p. 3.
  2. ^ "Statement by the Billiards Association and Control Council". Billiards and Snooker. London: Billiards Association and Control Council. January 1971. p. 12.
  3. ^ "Billiards and Snooker (masthead)". Billiards and Snooker. London: Billiards and Snooker Control Council. February 1971. p. 12.
  4. ^ a b Clive Everton (2 December 2011). Black Farce and Cue Ball Wizards: The Inside Story of the Snooker World. Mainstream Publishing. pp. 16–17. ISBN 978-1-78057-399-1.
  5. ^ Everton, Clive (4 February 2011). "After 40 years, Everton's still on the Snooker Scene". sportsjournalists.co.uk. Sports Journalists' Association. Archived from the original on 16 February 2011. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  6. ^ a b Morrison, Ian (1987). The Hamlyn Encyclopedia of Snooker. Twickenham: Hamlyn Publishing Group. p. 123. ISBN 0600556042.
  7. ^ "Snooker Scene is facing an attempt at closure, its editor says". The Press Gazette. 20 July 2006. Archived from the original on 21 February 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  8. ^ Townsend, Nick (14 October 2007). "Snooker: The cue crusader who is Scene and heard but never ignored". The Independent. London. Archived from the original on 21 February 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  9. ^ Gibson, Owen (10 January 2009). "Everton unhappy his BBC voice is being silenced". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 3 July 2019. Retrieved 23 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b Gordon Burn (4 July 2019). Pocket Money. Faber & Faber. p. 205. ISBN 978-0-571-26697-5.
  11. ^ a b "Snooker Scene (masthead)". Snooker Scene. Halesowen: Snooker Scene Ltd. April 2020. p. 3.
  12. ^ "Snooker Scene on 35 and still in prime position". Snooker Scene. Halesowen: Everton's News Agency. January 2006. p. 3.
  13. ^ Everton, Clive (October 2015). "Obituary: Janice Hale". Snooker Scene. Halesowen: Everton's News Agency. p. 27.
  14. ^ "Moving story". Snooker Scene. Stourbridge: Snooker Scene Ltd. November 2020. p. 3.

External linksEdit