Portal:Housing

The House and Housing portal

Common types of secondary dwelling units

Housing, or more generally, living spaces, refers to the construction and assigned usage of houses or buildings individually or collectively, for the purpose of shelter. Housing ensures that members of society have a place to live, whether it is a home or some other kind of dwelling, lodging or shelter. Many governments have one or more housing authorities, sometimes also called a housing ministry or housing department.

Housing in many different areas consists of public, social and private housing. In the United States, it wasn't until the 19th and 20th century that there was a lot more government involvement in housing. It was mainly aimed at helping those who were poor in the community. Public housing provides help and assistance to those who are poor and mainly low-income earners. A study report shows that there are many individuals living in public housing. There are over 1.2 million families or households. These types of housing were built mainly to provide people, mainly those who are low-income and elderly, with safe, affordable, and good housing units. There are many people who are a part of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). When counting, there are over nine hundred thousand participants in this program. (Full article...)

Selected article - show another

Ham House is an English country house in Richmond, England.

An English country house is a large house or mansion in the English countryside. Such houses were often owned by individuals who also owned a town house. This allowed them to spend time in the country and in the city—hence, for these people, the term distinguished between town and country. However, the term also encompasses houses that were, and often still are, the full-time residence for the landed gentry that ruled rural Britain until the Reform Act 1832. Frequently, the formal business of the counties was transacted in these country houses, having functional antecedents in manor houses.

With large numbers of indoor and outdoor staff, country houses were important as places of employment for many rural communities. In turn, until the agricultural depressions of the 1870s, the estates, of which country houses were the hub, provided their owners with incomes. However, the late 19th and early 20th centuries were the swansong of the traditional English country house lifestyle. Increased taxation and the effects of World War I led to the demolition of hundreds of houses; those that remained had to adapt to survive. (Full article...)
List of selected articles

Did you know (auto generated)

Nuvola apps filetypes.svg

Related Portals

Selected image - show another

More Did you know - show another

Gtk-dialog-question.svg
... that the Housing Act of 1937 sometimes called the Wagner-Steagall Act, provided for subsidies to be paid from the U.S. government to local public housing agencies (LHA's) to improve living conditions for low-income families?
Other "Did you know" facts... Read more...

WikiProjects

General images - show another
The following are images from various housing-related articles on Wikipedia.

Related articles

Categories

C Puzzle.png
Houses
Select [►] to view subcategories
House types
Select [►] to view subcategories
House styles
Select [►] to view subcategories

Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Tasks


Here are some tasks awaiting attention:
–When a task is completed, please remove it from the list.
Discover Wikipedia using portals