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The English Football Hall of Fame is housed at the National Football Museum, in Manchester, England. The Hall aims to celebrate and highlight the achievements of the all-time top English footballing talents, as well as non-English players and managers who have become significant figures in the history of the English game. New members are added each year, with an induction ceremony held in the autumn, formerly at varying locations, but exclusively at the Museum itself following its move to Manchester's Urbis building in 2012.

The Hall is on permanent display at the Museum. An accompanying book, The Football Hall of Fame: The Official Guide to the Greatest Footballing Legends of All Time, was first published in October 2005 by Robson Books. Authored by football historian Rob Galvin and the Museum's founding curator Mark Bushell, it is updated every year with the newest inductees, containing an in-depth profile about the career and reputation of each one, along with a select exhibit from the Museum which relates to their achievements.

Contents

Selection panelEdit

Members of the Hall of Fame are chosen by a panel. Initially, this comprised ex-players Jimmy Armfield, Sir Trevor Brooking, Jimmy Hill, Mark Lawrenson and Gordon Taylor, all of whom had become professional pundits and/or senior figures in football after retiring.

In subsequent years, former England national team manager Graham Taylor and former England international Steve Hodge have also served stints on the panel, though it is now chiefly a grouping of eminent football historians. The current panel features Neil Carter, Tony Collins, Jeffrey Hill, Peter Holme, Dick Holt, John Hughson, Simon Inglis, Alexander Jackson, Gary James, Graham Kelly, Tony Mason, Kevin Moore, Martin Polley, Dil Porter, Dave Russell, Matthew Taylor, Jean Williams and John Williams.

All surviving inductees to the Hall are granted an additional place on the panel. Two players have been inducted as the 'Fans' Choice', following polls on the BBC Sport and Sky Sports websites.

HistoryEdit

Initially, there were three main categories of induction; a mass of 'Players' and 'Managers' from the men's game, together with one figure from the women's game (Sir Alf Ramsey is noted as the only figure to date honoured in both of the main male categories). To be considered for induction, players must be either retired or at least 30 years of age. All inductees must also have played/managed for at least five years in England.

In 2007, two other regular categories were established. Chiefly, this was in recognition of football's central role in English culture, extending Hall of Fame honours to those who have contributed greatly to the English game outside the more obvious fields of play. The Community Champion category – sponsored by the Football Foundation – honours professional players who have donated their spare time and money to the grassroots level of the sport, while the Football for All Award – sponsored by The Football Association – is presented to pioneers of the various forms of football played by disabled people.

Since 2009, the Museum has also commemorated great teams from history alongside its awarding of individual players and coaches. The criteria for a team's induction is that they must have played at least a quarter of a century prior. 2013 saw the first induction of a referee, while 2017 saw the first induction of a figure from the football media.

On occasional circumstances there will also be a presentation of a 'special award', usually to mark significant anniversaries. Jimmy Hill is to date the sole recipient of an honour styled as a Lifetime Achievement Award, in celebration of his unusual polymathic career in the game.

InducteesEdit

Positions key
GK Goalkeeper
DF Defender
MF Midfielder
FW Forward

MenEdit

 
George Best, inducted in 2002.
 
Jimmy Greaves and Bobby Charlton, both inducted in 2002.
 
Stanley Matthews, inducted in 2002.
 
Arthur Wharton, inducted in 2003.
 
Alan Shearer, inducted in 2004.
 
Dennis Bergkamp, inducted in 2007.
 
Thierry Henry, inducted in 2008.
 
Paul Scholes, inducted in 2008.
 
Gary Speed, inducted in 2017.
Year Name Position Nationality Ref.
2002 Gordon Banks GK   England [1]
2002 George Best FW   Northern Ireland [1]
2002 Eric Cantona FW   France [1]
2002 John Charles FW   Wales [1]
2002 Bobby Charlton[n 1] MF   England [1]
2002 Kenny Dalglish FW   Scotland [1]
2002 Dixie Dean FW   England [1]
2002 Peter Doherty FW   Northern Ireland [1]
2002 Duncan Edwards FW   England [1]
2002 Tom Finney[n 2] FW   England [1]
2002 Paul Gascoigne MF   England [1]
2002 Jimmy Greaves FW   England [1]
2002 Johnny Haynes FW   England [1]
2002 Kevin Keegan MF   England [1]
2002 Denis Law FW   Scotland [1]
2002 Nat Lofthouse FW   England [1]
2002 Dave Mackay DF   Scotland [1]
2002 Stanley Matthews MF   England [1]
2002 Bobby Moore DF   England [1]
2002 Bryan Robson MF   England [1]
2002 Peter Shilton GK   England [1]
2002 Billy Wright DF   England [1]
2003 Alan Ball MF   England [1]
2003 Danny Blanchflower DF   Northern Ireland [1]
2003 Pat Jennings GK   Northern Ireland [1]
2003 Tommy Lawton FW   England [1]
2003 Gary Lineker FW   England [1]
2003 Stan Mortensen FW   England [1]
2003 Peter Schmeichel[n 3] GK   Denmark [1]
2003 Arthur Wharton GK   England[n 4] [1]
2004 Tony Adams DF   England [2]
2004 Viv Anderson DF   England [3]
2004 Billy Bremner MF   Scotland [4]
2004 Geoff Hurst FW   England [5]
2004 Roy Keane MF   Republic of Ireland [6]
2004 Wilf Mannion FW   England [7]
2004 Alan Shearer[n 5] FW   England [8]
2005 John Barnes MF   England [9]
2005 Colin Bell MF   England [10]
2005 Jack Charlton DF   England [11]
2005 Ryan Giggs[n 6] MF   Wales [12]
2005 Alex James DF   Scotland [13]
2005 Bert Trautmann GK   West Germany[n 7] [14]
2005 Ian Wright FW   England [15]
2006 Liam Brady MF   Republic of Ireland [16]
2006 Alan Hansen DF   Scotland [17]
2006 Roger Hunt FW   England [18]
2006 Jackie Milburn FW   England [19]
2006 Martin Peters MF   England [20]
2006 Ian Rush FW   Wales
2006 Gianfranco Zola FW   Italy [21]
2007 Peter Beardsley FW   England [22]
2007 Dennis Bergkamp[n 8] FW   Netherlands [23]
2007 Glenn Hoddle MF   England [24]
2007 Mark Hughes FW   Wales [24]
2007 Billy Meredith FW   Wales [25]
2007 Graeme Souness MF   Scotland [26]
2007 Nobby Stiles DF   England [27]
2008 Jimmy Armfield DF   England [28]
2008 David Beckham MF   England [29]
2008 Steve Bloomer FW   England
2008 Thierry Henry[n 9] FW   France [30]
2008 Emlyn Hughes[n 10] MF   England
2008 Paul Scholes MF   England [31]
2008 Ray Wilson DF   England [32]
2009 Ossie Ardiles MF   Argentina [33]
2009 Cliff Bastin MF   England [34]
2009 Trevor Brooking[n 2] MF   England [33]
2009 George Cohen DF   England [33]
2009 Frank McLintock DF   Scotland [35]
2009 Len Shackleton FW   England [36]
2009 Teddy Sheringham FW   England [37]
2009 Frank Swift GK   England [38]
2010 Charlie Buchan RW   England [39]
2010 Ian Callaghan LW   England [40]
2010 Ray Clemence GK   England [41]
2010 Johnny Giles MF   Republic of Ireland [41]
2010 Francis Lee FW   England [42]
2010 Alf Ramsey DF   England [43]
2010 Clem Stephenson FW   England [44]
2013 Raich Carter FW   England [45]
2013 Eddie Gray MF   Scotland [45]
2013 Cliff Jones FW   Wales [45]
2013 Matt Le Tissier FW   England [45]
2013 Mike Summerbee MF   England [45]
2013 Ray Wilkins MF   England [45]
2014 Trevor Francis FW   England [46]
2014 Hughie Gallacher FW   Scotland [46]
2014 Jimmy McIlroy FW   Northern Ireland [46]
2014 Michael Owen FW   England [46]
2014 Patrick Vieira MF   France [46]
2015 Ivor Allchurch FW   Wales [47]
2015 Bob Crompton DF   England [48]
2015 Norman Hunter DF   England [48]
2015 Paul McGrath DF   Republic of Ireland [48]
2015 Alan Mullery MF   England [48]
2015 Gary Neville DF   England [48]
2015 Stuart Pearce DF   England [48]
2016 Rio Ferdinand DF   England [49]
2016 Denis Irwin DF   Republic of Ireland [49]
2016 Mark Lawrenson DF   Republic of Ireland [49]
2016 Billy Liddell MF   Scotland [49]
2016 John Robertson MF   Scotland [49]
2016 David Seaman GK   England [49]
2016 Neville Southall[n 11] GK   Wales [49]
2016 Gordon Strachan MF   Scotland [49]
2017 Billy Bonds DF   England [50]
2017 Steven Gerrard[n 12] MF   England [50]
2017 Frank Lampard MF   England [50]
2017 Charlie Roberts DF   England [51]
2017 Gary Speed MF   Wales [50]
2017 Bob Wilson GK   Scotland [50]

WomenEdit

 
Hope Powell, inducted in 2003.
 
Kelly Smith, inducted in 2017.
Year Name Position Nationality Ref.
2002 Lily Parr FW   England [1]
2003 Hope Powell DF   England [1]
2004 Sue Lopez DF   England [52]
2005 Debbie Bampton MF   England [53]
2006 Gillian Coulthard MF   England [54]
2007 Karen Walker FW   England
2007 Joan Whalley MF   England [55]
2008 Pauline Cope FW   England [56]
2009 Marieanne Spacey FW   England [57]
2010 Brenda Sempare MF   England [58]
2013 Sheila Parker FW   England [59]
2014 Sylvia Gore FW   England [46]
2015 Faye White DF   England [48]
2016 Rachel Brown-Finnis GK   England [49]
2016 Rachel Unitt DF   England [49]
2017 Kelly Smith FW   England [50]
2017 Rachel Yankey MF   England [50]

ManagersEdit

 
Alf Ramsey, inducted as a manager in 2002, and later as a player in 2010. He is the only person to be honoured as such.
Year Name Nationality Ref.
2002 Matt Busby   Scotland [1]
2002 Brian Clough   England [1]
2002 Alex Ferguson[n 2]   Scotland [1]
2002 Bob Paisley   England[n 13] [1]
2002 Alf Ramsey   England [1]
2002 Bill Shankly   Scotland [1]
2003 Herbert Chapman   England[n 13] [1]
2003 Stan Cullis   England [1]
2003 Bill Nicholson   England [1]
2003 Bobby Robson   England [1]
2004 Dario Gradi   England[n 14] [60]
2004 Don Revie   England [61]
2005 Howard Kendall   England[n 13]
2005 Walter Winterbottom   England[n 13] [62]
2006 Ron Greenwood   England[n 13]
2006 Arsène Wenger   France[n 13]
2007 Terry Venables   England [63]
2008 Bertie Mee   England[n 13] [64]
2009 Malcolm Allison   England[n 13] [65]
2009 Joe Mercer   England [66]
2010 Harry Catterick   England[n 13] [41]

Other awardsEdit

In 2004, Sepp Blatter, then president of FIFA, was inducted to mark the world federation's centenary. He became the first figure outside the English game to be honoured by the Museum.

In 2007, the Football Foundation Community Champion award was created, with its inaugural holder being Niall Quinn. The following winners were Peter Beardsley (2008), Robbie Earle (2009)[67] and Graham Taylor (2010).[68] The award has been inactive since then.

Also in 2007, the Football for All Award was created, with its inaugural holder being Stephen Daley, a Northern Irish-born English footballer whose professional career was ended by loss of vision at 18, and later became the captain of the partially sighted England national team. In 2008, Steve Johnson, a regular member of the England squad for amputee football and the leader of Everton's charity venture, Everton in the Community, won the award.[69] In 2009, Ronnie Watson, a footballer who has learning disabilities, won the award. He had been training with Oldham Athletic, in preparation for the 2008 European Learning Disability Championship, where he would captain the England LD side.[70] In 2010, George Ferguson won the award. Ferguson is a long-time member of Everton's blind football team and secretary of the Visually Impaired Football League. 2013 saw David Clarke, captain of Great Britain blind football team, win the award. From 2014 to 2017, members of the England cerebral palsy team were honoured, with Matt Dimbylow,[46] Gary Davies,[48] Martin Sinclair[49] and Alistair Patrick-Heselton winning.[71]

The presentation of a special award would happen sporadically over the years. In 2007, Sheffield, the world's oldest football club was commemorated for reaching its 150th anniversary. In 2008, Michel Platini, then president of UEFA, became the second figure outside the English game to be honoured by the Museum in an one-off European Hall of Fame ceremony. Two years later, Jimmy Hill was honoured with a special lifetime achievement award.[72] In 2013, the special award was used three times. Firstly, to Civil Service, the only surviving club of those represented at the official formation of the Football Association in 1863. Secondly, to Ebenezer Cobb Morley, the first secretary of the Football Association and often considered to be its founding father, inducted to mark the governing body's 150th anniversary. Thirdly, to William McGregor, the founder of the Football League was inducted to commemorate the organisation's 125th anniversary. In 2014, the Football Battalion, a group of professional footballers and fans who fought in the Battle of the Somme, were honoured.[46] In 2015, Sun Jihai, the first Chinese player in the English game, was made "Anglo-Chinese Football Ambassador". His surprise induction was announced as part of the state visit to the United Kingdom by Chinese President Xi Jinping. The decision caused controversy on social media with Labour's shadow minister for sport Clive Efford suggesting that the award had been bought by the office of Prime Minister David Cameron. A spokesman for the museum explained that Sun had been recognised for his "ambassadorial role in enhancing the profile and popularity of English football to a Chinese audience".[73] In 2016, two clubs were honoured: Cambridge University, for their unofficial claim to be the world's oldest club; some documents in their archive suggest a foundation year of 1856, the year before Sheffield began,[74] and Notts County for their status as the world's oldest club currently playing at a professional level; founded in 1862.[75]

Team awards were introduced in 2008, as part of a one-off European Hall of Fame ceremony. Manchester United and Liverpool's European Cup winning sides of 1968 and 1978 were the first teams inducted. In 2009, Manchester United's Busby Babes squad of the 1950s and Manchester City's cup-winning squad of the late 1960s and early 1970s were inducted.[76] In 2010, the World Cup winning England squad was inducted. In 2011, Aston Villa's European Cup winning side of 1982 was inducted in a special ceremony. In 2014, Preston North End's "Invincibles" team was inducted.[46] In 2016, Nottingham Forest's European Cup winning squad of 1979 and 1980 was inducted.[75]

In 2013, a referee section was created, with Jack Taylor being its only inductee so far,[77] and in 2017, a journalism section was created with Hugh McIlvanney the inaugural holder.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Also honoured with Presidency of the Museum.
  2. ^ a b c Also honoured with Vice-Presidency of the Museum.
  3. ^ Schmeichel collected his Hall of Fame trophy in 2013, having missed his initial inauguration in 2003.
  4. ^ Born in Jamestown, Gold Coast (now Accra, Ghana). Wharton moved to England aged 19, but he did not play for the national team.
  5. ^ Shearer collected his Hall of Fame trophy in 2014, having missed his initial inauguration in 2004.
  6. ^ Giggs collected his Hall of Fame trophy in 2015, having missed his initial inauguration in 2005.
  7. ^ Born in Bremen, Germany. Trautmann's professional career began a few months after the creation of West Germany, but he did not play for the national team, despite the possibility to do so.
  8. ^ Fans' Choice, in conjunction with BBC Sport.
  9. ^ Henry collected his Hall of Fame trophy at a special ceremony in 2011, having missed his initial inauguration in 2008.
  10. ^ Fans' Choice, in conjunction with Sky Sports.
  11. ^ Also honoured in 2008 as Everton supporters' "favourite performer in European games" at a one-off European Hall of Fame ceremony.
  12. ^ Also honoured in 2008 as Liverpool supporters' "favourite performer in European games" at a one-off European Hall of Fame ceremony.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i Did not play internationally during his professional career.
  14. ^ Born in Milan, Italy. Gradi moved to England aged 4, but he did not play for the national team.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit