2019 Monte Carlo Rally

The 2019 Monte Carlo Rally (also known as the 87e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo) was a motor racing event for rally cars that was held over four days between 25 and 28 January 2019.[2] It marked the eighty-seventh running of the Monte Carlo Rally, and was the first round of the 2019 World Rally Championship. It was also the first round of the World Rally Championship-2 and the newly-created WRC-2 Pro class. The 2019 event was based in the town of Gap in the Hautes-Alpes department of France and consists of sixteen special stages. The rally covered a total competitive distance of 322.81 km (200.58 mi).

2019 Monte Carlo Rally
87e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo
Round 1 of 14 in the 2019 World Rally Championship
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Ogier at Basse Correo Stage zoom, Rallye Monte-Carlo 2019.jpg
Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia won the rally for the sixth time.
Host country Monaco[a]
Rally baseGap, Hautes-Alpes
Dates run24 – 27 January 2019
Start locationPlace Desmichels, Gap
Finish locationCasino Square, Monaco
Stages16 (323.83 km; 201.22 miles)[1]
Stage surfaceTarmac / Snow
Transport distance1,042.6 km (647.8 miles)
Overall distance1,366.43 km (849.06 miles)
Results
Overall winnerFrance Sébastien Ogier
France Julien Ingrassia
France Citroën Total WRT
3:21:15.9
WRC-2 Pro winnerUnited Kingdom Gus Greensmith
United Kingdom Elliott Edmondson
United Kingdom M-Sport Ford WRT
3:34:20.5
WRC-2 winnerFrance Yoann Bonato
France Benjamin Boulloud
France Yoann Bonato
3:35:12.4
Power Stage winnerUnited Kingdom Kris Meeke
United Kingdom Sebastian Marshall
Japan Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT
Crews registered84
Crews84 at start, 67 at finish

Reigning World Drivers' and World Co-Drivers Champions Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia were the defending rally winners. M-Sport Ford WRT, the team they drove for in 2018, were the defending manufacturers' winners.[3] The Škoda Motorsport crew of Jan Kopecký and Pavel Dresler were the defending winners in the World Rally Championship-2 category,[4] but did not enter the rally.[5] In the World Rally Championship-3 category, Italian privateers Enrico Brazzoli and Luca Beltrame were the reigning rally winners, but did not defend their title as the WRC-3 category was discontinued in 2019.[6][b]

Ogier and Ingrassia successfully defended their titles. Their team, Citroën World Rally Team, were the manufacturers' winners. The victory also marked the 100th world rally success for the French manufacturer.[7] The M-Sport Ford WRT crew of Gus Greensmith and Elliott Edmondson became the first crew to win a event in the WRC-2 Pro category, while Yoann Bonato and Benjamin Boulloud won the wider WRC-2 class, finishing second in the combined WRC-2 category.[8]

BackgroundEdit

Entry listEdit

The following crews are entered into the rally. The event is open to crews competing in the World Rally Championship, World Rally Championship-2 and WRC-2 Pro, the FIA R-GT Cup, and privateer entries not registered to score points in any championship. Eighty-four crews registered to compete, including eleven competing with World Rally Cars and eleven in World Rally Championship-2. Three of these crews were nominated to score points in the WRC-2 Pro class, but one withdrew before the rally and the crew became a regular WRC-2 entrant.

No. Driver Co-Driver Entrant Car Tyre
World Rally Car entries
1   Sébastien Ogier   Julien Ingrassia   Citroën Total WRT Citroën C3 WRC M
3   Teemu Suninen   Marko Salminen   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
4   Esapekka Lappi   Janne Ferm   Citroën Total WRT Citroën C3 WRC M
5   Kris Meeke   Sebastian Marshall   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
7   Pontus Tidemand   Ola Fløene   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
8   Ott Tänak   Martin Järveoja   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
10   Jari-Matti Latvala   Miikka Anttila   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
11   Thierry Neuville   Nicolas Gilsoul   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
19   Sébastien Loeb   Daniel Elena   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
33   Elfyn Evans   Scott Martin   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
89   Andreas Mikkelsen   Anders Jæger-Synnevaag   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
World Rally Championship-2 Pro entries
21   Gus Greensmith   Elliott Edmondson   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 M
30   Kalle Rovanperä   Jonne Halttunen   Škoda Motorsport[c] Škoda Fabia R5 M
World Rally Championship-2 entries
22   Yoann Bonato   Benjamin Boulloud   Yoann Bonato[d][e] Citroën C3 R5 M
23   Ole Christian Veiby   Jonas Andersson   Ole Christian Veiby[f] Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 M
24   Nicolas Ciamin   Yannick Roche   Nicolas Ciamin[g] Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 M
25   Guillaume De Mevius   Martijn Wydaeghe   Guillaume De Mevius[h] Citroën C3 R5 M
26   Adrien Fourmaux   Renaud Jamoul   Adrien Fourmaux[i] Ford Fiesta R5 M
27   Grégoire Munster   Louis Louka   Grégoire Munster Škoda Fabia R5 P
28   "Pedro"[j]   Emanuele Baldaccini   "Pedro" Hyundai i20 R5 P
29   Rhys Yates   Denis Giraudet   Rhys Yates Škoda Fabia R5 P
35   Manuel Villa   Luca Beltrame   Manuel Villa Škoda Fabia R5 P
Other major entries
20   Mauro Miele   Luca Beltrame   Mauro Miele[k] Citroën DS3 WRC M
31   Takamoto Katsuta   Daniel Barritt   Tommi Mäkinen Racing Ford Fiesta R5 P
34   Stéphane Sarrazin   Jacques-Julien Renucci   Stéphane Sarrazin Hyundai i20 R5 P
50   "Hervé Knapick"[l]   Marie-Laure Lemonnier-Peu   "Hervé Knapick" Citroën DS3 R5 P
Source:[5]

RouteEdit

The rally route is made up of 323.83 km (201.22 mi) in competitive stages, making the 2019 route the shortest since the 2004 event. The route will be 71.93 km (44.7 mi) shorter than the one used in 2018.[1] The Thoard — Sisteron and Bayons — Bréziers were removed from the itinerary and replaced by a new stage from La Bréole to Selonnet and the revival of the Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus stage, which had not been contested for a decade. The opening day's stages were also revised to be better-centred around the rally base in Gap.[1] The second and third leg of the rally were unchanged from the 2018 event. The route was revised after the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile introduced rule changes for the 2019 championship that limited the maximum distance of a route to 350 km (217.5 mi).[2]

ItineraryEdit

 
The Col de Braus mountain pass will be contested as the rally's Power Stage.

All dates and times are CET (UTC+1).

Date Time No. Stage name Distance
24 January 10:00 Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km
Leg 1 — 166.47 km
24 January 19:38 SS1 La Bréole — Selonnet 20.76 km
20:41 SS2 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 20.59 km
25 January 9:11 SS3 Valdrôme — Sigottier 1 20.04 km
10:14 SS4 Roussieux — Laborel 1 24.05 km
11:37 SS5 Curbans — Piégut 1 18.47 km
14:23 SS6 Valdrôme — Sigottier 2 20.04 km
15:26 SS7 Roussieux — Laborel 2 24.05 km
16:49 SS8 Curbans — Piégut 2 18.47 km
Leg 2 — 93.38 km
26 January 8:48 SS9 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 1 29.82 km
10:46 SS10 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km
12:47 SS11 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 2 29.82 km
14:08 SS12 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km
Leg 3 — 63.98 km
27 January 8:20 SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km
9:08 SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.58 km
10:55 SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km
12:18 SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 2 [Power Stage] 13.58 km
Source:[1]

ReportEdit

World Rally CarsEdit

Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja took the early lead during the first two night stages. However, their lead was short-lived as Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul moved to the front after the cancellation of the third stage.[9] Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia then took over the rally as the Belgian crew missed a junction. Eventually, the six-time world champions won the rally for the sixth time in a row. Neuville and Gilsoul were second, 2.2 seconds behind Ogier and Ingrassia, thus making 2019 the closest finish to the Monte Carlo Rally in history. The previous closest finish was the 1979 edition, with Bernard Darniche winning by just 6.6 seconds over Björn Waldegård.[10]

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Event Stage
1 1 1 Sébastien Ogier Julien Ingrassia Citroën Total WRT Citroën C3 WRC 3:21:15.9 0.0 25 4
2 2 11 Thierry Neuville Nicolas Gilsoul Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 3:21:18.1 +2.2 18 3
3 3 8 Ott Tänak Martin Järveoja Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:23:31.1 +2:15.2 15 2
4 4 19 Sébastien Loeb Daniel Elena Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 3:23:44.1 +2:28.2 12 0
5 5 10 Jari-Matti Latvala Miikka Anttila Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:23:45.8 +2:29.9 10 0
6 6 5 Kris Meeke Sebastian Marshall Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:26:52.1 +5:36.2 8 5
11 7 3 Teemu Suninen Marko Salminen M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3:39:12.7 +17:56.8 0 1
20 8 7 Pontus Tidemand Ola Fløene M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3:50:50.5 +29:34.6 0 0
Retired SS10 33 Elfyn Evans Scott Martin M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC Accident 0 0
Retired SS10 89 Andreas Mikkelsen Anders Jæger-Synnevaag Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC Lost wheel 0 0
Retired SS9 4 Esapekka Lappi Janne Ferm Citroën Total WRT Citroën C3 WRC Engine 0 0

Special stagesEdit

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
24 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Meeke / Marshall Toyota Yaris WRC 1:56.8 N/A
SS1 La Bréole — Selonnet 20.76 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 13:02.0 Tänak / Järveoja
SS2 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 20.59 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 13:18.5
25 January SS3 Valdrôme — Sigottier 1 20.04 km Stage cancelled[m]
SS4 Roussieux — Laborel 1 24.05 km Loeb / Elena Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 14:42.1 Neuville / Gilsoul
SS5 Curbans — Piégut 1 18.47 km Ogier / Ingrassia Citroën C3 WRC 13:49.1
SS6 Valdrôme — Sigottier 2 20.04 km Ogier / Ingrassia
Latvala / Anttila
Citroën C3 WRC
Toyota Yaris WRC
13:39.5
SS7 Roussieux — Laborel 2 24.05 km Loeb / Elena Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 14:26.6 Ogier/Ingrassia
SS8 Curbans — Piégut 2 18.47 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 13:25.5
26 January SS9 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 1 29.82 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 20:54.0
SS10 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 10:12.1
SS11 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 2 29.82 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 19:54.5
SS12 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 9:53.2
27 January SS13 La Bollène Vésubie - Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 11:40.3
SS14 La Cabarette - Col de Braus 1 13.58 km Tänak / Järveoja Toyota Yaris WRC 9:52.4
SS15 La Bollène Vésubie - Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 11:25.5
SS16 La Cabarette - Col de Braus 2 [Power Stage] 13.58 km Meeke / Marshall Toyota Yaris WRC 9:37.3

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships Manufacturers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points Move Manufacturer Points
1 Sébastien Ogier 29 Julien Ingrassia 29 Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 30
2 Thierry Neuville 21 Nicolas Gilsoul 21 Citroën Total WRT 25
3 Ott Tänak 17 Martin Järveoja 17 Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 25
4 Kris Meeke 13 Sebastian Marshall 13 M-Sport Ford WRT 14
5 Sébastien Loeb 12 Daniel Elena 12

World Rally Championship-2 ProEdit

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Class Event
7 1 21 Gus Greensmith Elliott Edmondson M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 3:34:20.5 0.0 25 6
18 2 30 Kalle Rovanperä Jonne Halttunen Škoda Motorsport Škoda Fabia R5 3:47:48.3 +13:27.8 18 0

Special stagesEdit

Results in bold denote first in the RC2 class, the class which both the WRC-2 Pro and WRC-2 championships run to.

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
24 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 2:04.9 N/A
SS1 La Bréole — Selonnet 20.76 km Greensmith / Edmondson Ford Fiesta R5 14:28.9 Greensmith / Edmondson
SS2 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 20.59 km Greensmith / Edmondson Ford Fiesta R5 14:41.1
25 January SS3 Valdrôme — Sigottier 1 20.04 km Stage cancelled[m]
SS4 Roussieux — Laborel 1 24.05 km Rovanperä / Halttunen[n] Škoda Fabia R5 15:57.8 Greensmith / Edmondson
SS5 Curbans — Piégut 1 18.47 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 14:37.3
SS6 Valdrôme — Sigottier 2 20.04 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 14:11.6
SS7 Roussieux — Laborel 2 24.05 km Greensmith / Edmondson Ford Fiesta R5 15:17.8
SS8 Curbans — Piégut 2 18.47 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 13:58.3
26 January SS9 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 1 29.82 km Greensmith / Edmondson Ford Fiesta R5 21:56.1
SS10 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km Greensmith / Edmondson
Rovanperä / Halttunen
Ford Fiesta R5
Škoda Fabia R5
10:57.8
SS11 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 2 29.82 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 20:38.4
SS12 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km Greensmith / Edmondson Ford Fiesta R5 10:30.9
27 January SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra-Cava 1 18.41 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 12:19.9
SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.58 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 10:15.7
SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra-Cava 2 18.41 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 12:01.4
SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.58 km Rovanperä / Halttunen Škoda Fabia R5 10:07.2

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships Manufacturers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points Move Manufacturer Points
1 Gus Greensmith 25 Elliott Edmondson 25 M-Sport Ford WRT 25
2 Kalle Rovanperä 18 Jonne Halttunen 18 Škoda Motorsport 18

World Rally Championship-2Edit

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Class Event
8 1 22 Yoann Bonato Benjamin Boulloud Yoann Bonato Citroën C3 R5 3:35:12.4 0.0 25 4
10 2 26 Adrien Fourmaux Renaud Jamoul Adrien Fourmaux Ford Fiesta R5 3:37:19.3 +2:06.9 18 1
12 3 23 Ole Christian Veiby Jonas Andersson Ole Christian Veiby Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 3:39:29.1 +4:16.7 15 0
14 4 29 Rhys Yates Denis Giraudet Rhys Yates Škoda Fabia R5 3:42:10.8 +6:58.4 12 0
16 5 24 Nicolas Ciamin Yannick Roche Nicolas Ciamin Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 3:43:33.2 +8:20.8 10 0
24 6 35 Manuel Villa Daniele Michi Manuel Villa Škoda Fabia R5 3:55:18.5 +20:06.1 8 0
Retired SS14 25 Guillaume De Mevius Martijn Wydaeghe Guillaume De Mevius Citroën C3 R5 Accident 0 0
Retired SS12 28 "Pedro" Emanuele Baldaccini Daytona Race Hyundai i20 R5 Accident 0 0
Retired SS11 27 Grégoire Munster Louis Louka Grégoire Munster Škoda Fabia R5 Accident 0 0

Special stagesEdit

Results in bold denote first in the RC2 class, the class which both the WRC-2 Pro and WRC-2 championships run to.

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
24 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Veiby / Andersson Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 2:07.8 N/A
SS1 La Bréole — Selonnet 20.76 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 14:02.8 Bonato / Boulloud
SS2 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 20.59 km de Mevius / Wydaeghe Citroën C3 R5 14:24.8
25 January SS3 Valdrôme — Sigottier 1 20.04 km Stage cancelled[m]
SS4 Roussieux — Laborel 1 24.05 km Bonato / Boulloud[n] Citroën C3 R5 16:07.6 Bonato / Boulloud
SS5 Curbans — Piégut 1 18.47 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 14:45.4
SS6 Valdrôme — Sigottier 2 20.04 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 14:19.6
SS7 Roussieux — Laborel 2 24.05 km Ciamin / Roche Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 15:36.1
SS8 Curbans — Piégut 2 18.47 km Formaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 14:21.1
26 January SS9 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 1 29.82 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 22:04.8
SS10 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km de Mevius / Wydaeghe Citroën C3 R5 11:01.2
SS11 Agnières-en-Dévoluy — Corps 2 29.82 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 20:54.2
SS12 St-Léger-les-Mélèzes — La Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km de Mevius / Wydaeghe Citroën C3 R5 10:31.8
27 January SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra-Cava 1 18.41 km Ciamin / Roche Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 12:07.1
SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.58 km Ciamin / Roche Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 10:07.6
SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra-Cava 2 18.41 km Ciamin / Roche Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 11:56.3
SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.58 km Ciamin / Roche Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 9:59.2

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points
1 Yoann Bonato 25 Benjamin Boulloud 25
2 Adrien Fourmaux 18 Renaud Jamoul 18
3 Ole Christian Veiby 15 Jonas Andersson 15
4 Rhys Yates 12 Denis Giraudet 12
5 Nicolas Ciamin 10 Yannick Roche 10

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Although the rally is run in France, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile does not consider France to be a host nation.
  2. ^ Brazzoli and Beltrame entered the rally separately; Brazzoli in a Group R-GT and Beltrame in a privately-entered pre-2017 World Rally Car.[5]
  3. ^ Entry run in conjunction with TGS Worldwide.
  4. ^ Entry operated by CHL Sport Auto.
  5. ^ Initially entered in the WRC-2 pro class.
  6. ^ Entry operated by BRR Baumschlager Rallye & Racing.
  7. ^ Entry operated by THX Racing.
  8. ^ Entry operated by DG Sport.
  9. ^ Entry operated by Team France FFSA Rallye.
  10. ^ Pseudonym of Massimo Pedretti.
  11. ^ Entry operated by Dream One Racing.
  12. ^ Pseudonym of Hervé Lemonnier.
  13. ^ a b c SS3 cancelled due to safety reasons when spectator areas became overcrowded.[9]
  14. ^ a b The winner of SS4 in the RC2 class was the non-championship crew of Stéphane Sarrazin and Jacques-Julien Renucci, where they set 15:57.8.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Rallye Monte-Carlo – Edition 2019". acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. Retrieved 19 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b "FIA announces World Motor Sport Council decisions". fia.com. Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. 12 October 2018. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Ogier wins Rallye Monte-Carlo". speedcafe.com. 29 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  4. ^ "Sunday in WRC 2: Kopecký Wins in Style". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 28 January 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  5. ^ a b c "87. Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo" (PDF). Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  6. ^ Herrero, Daniel (13 October 2018). "Australia remains finale on 2019 WRC calendar". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  7. ^ "Sunday in Monte-Carlo:Ogier claims sixth straight win". wrc.com. WRC. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  8. ^ "WRC 2 Monte-Carlo:Greensmith secures Pro victory". wrc.com. WRC. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  9. ^ a b Cozens, Jack (25 January 2019). "Monte Carlo Rally WRC: Neuville leads, Loeb shows pace". autosport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 25 January 2019.
  10. ^ "47. Rallye Automobile de Monte-Carlo 1979". ewrc-results.com. Retrieved 2 February 2019.

External linksEdit

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2018 Rally Australia (2018)
2019 FIA World Rally Championship Next rally:
2019 Rally Sweden
Previous rally:
2018 Monte Carlo Rally
2019 Monte Carlo Rally Next rally:
2020 Monte Carlo Rally