2020 Monte Carlo Rally

The 2020 Monte Carlo Rally (also known as the 88e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo) was a motor racing event for rally cars that was held over four days between 23 and 26 January 2020.[2] It marked the eighty-eighth running of the Monte Carlo Rally, and was the first round of the 2020 World Rally Championship, World Rally Championship-2 and World Rally Championship-3. The 2020 event was based in the town of Gap in the Hautes-Alpes department of France and consisted of sixteen special stages. The rally covered a total competitive distance of 304.28 km (189.07 mi).[1]

2020 Monte Carlo Rally
88e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo
Round 1 of 13 in the 2020 World Rally Championship
Next event →
Henning Solberg Rally Monte Carlo 2015 001.jpg
The Monte Carlo Rally is run on a mixture of tarmac and snow stages.
Host country Monaco[a]
Rally baseGap, Hautes-Alpes
Dates run23 – 26 January 2020
Start locationQuai Albert, Monaco
Finish locationCasino Square, Monaco
Stages16 (304.28 km; 189.07 miles)[1]
Stage surfaceTarmac and snow
Transport distance1,201.36 km (746.49 miles)
Overall distance1,505.64 km (935.56 miles)
Results
Overall winnerBelgium Thierry Neuville
Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul
South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT
3:10:57.6
WRC-2 winnerNorway Mads Østberg
Norway Torstein Eriksen
France PH-Sport
3:25:19.4
WRC-3 winnerFrance Eric Camilli
France François-Xavier Buresi
3:24:39.8
Power Stage winnerBelgium Thierry Neuville
Belgium Nicolas Gilsoul
South Korea Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT
9:39.0
Crews registered88
Crews85 at start, 73 at finish

Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia were the defending rally winners.[3] The Citroën World Rally Team, the team they drove for in 2019, were the reigning manufacturers' winners, but were not defending their title after parent company Citroën withdrew from the sport.[4] Gus Greensmith and Elliott Edmondson were the defending winners in the World Rally Championship-2 category, but were not defending their WRC-2 title as they joined the WRC category in 2020.[5][b] In the World Rally Championship-3 category, French privateers Yoann Bonato and Benjamin Boulloud were the reigning rally winners.[5][c]

Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul were the overall winners of the rally, winning the Monte Carlo rally for the first time. Their team, Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT, were the manufacturers' winners.[6] Mads Østberg and Torstein Eriksen were the winners in the WRC-2 category, while Eric Camilli and François-Xavier Buresi were the winners in the WRC-3 category.[7]

BackgroundEdit

Entry listEdit

The following crews were entered into the rally. The event was open to crews competing in the World Rally Championship, its support categories, the World Rally Championship-2 and World Rally Championship-3, and privateer entries that were not registered to score points in any championship. A total of eighty-eight entries were received, with eleven crews entered in World Rally Cars, five crews entered Group R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-2 and a further thirteen crews entered Group R5 cars in the World Rally Championship-3.

No. Driver Co-Driver Entrant Car Tyre
World Rally Championship entries
3   Teemu Suninen   Jarmo Lehtinen   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
4   Esapekka Lappi   Janne Ferm   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
8   Ott Tänak   Martin Järveoja   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
9   Sébastien Loeb   Daniel Elena   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
11   Thierry Neuville   Nicolas Gilsoul   Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC M
17   Sébastien Ogier   Julien Ingrassia   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
18   Takamoto Katsuta   Daniel Barritt   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
33   Elfyn Evans   Scott Martin   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
40   Deividas Jocius   Mindaugas Varža   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
44   Gus Greensmith   Elliott Edmondson   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC M
69   Kalle Rovanperä   Jonne Halttunen   Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC M
World Rally Championship-2 entries
20   Mads Østberg   Torstein Eriksen   PH-Sport[d] Citroën C3 R5 M
21   Nikolay Gryazin   Yaroslav Fedorov   Hyundai Motorsport N[e] Hyundai i20 R5 P
22   Ole Christian Veiby   Jonas Andersson   Hyundai Motorsport N[e] Hyundai i20 R5 P
23   Adrien Fourmaux   Renaud Jamoul   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II M
24   Rhys Yates   James Morgan   M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II M
World Rally Championship-3 entries
25   Paulo Nobre   Gabriel Morales   Paulo Nobre[f] Škoda Fabia R5 P
26   Yoann Bonato   Benjamin Boulloud   Yoann Bonato[g] Citroën C3 R5 M
27   Eric Camilli   François-Xavier Buresi   Eric Camilli[h] Citroën C3 R5 M
28   Nicolas Ciamin   Yannick Roche   Nicolas Ciamin[i] Citroën C3 R5 M
29   "Pedro"[j]   Emmanuele Baldaccini   "Pedro"[k] Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II P
30   Grégoire Munster   Louis Louka   Grégoire Munster Škoda Fabia R5 P
31   Yohan Rossel   Benoît Fulcrand   PH-Sport[d] Citroën C3 R5 M
32   Stéphane Sarrazin   Kévin Parent   Stéphane Sarrazin[l] Hyundai i20 R5 P
34   Umberto Scandola   Guido D'Amore   Umberto Scandola Hyundai i20 R5 M
35   Andrea Nucita   Bernardo Di Caro   Andrea Nucita Hyundai i20 R5 P
36   Miguel Díaz-Aboitiz   Diego Sanjuan De Eusebio   Miguel Díaz-Aboitiz Škoda Fabia R5 P
37   Enrico Brazzoli   Maurizio Barone   Enrico Brazzoli Škoda Fabia R5 P
38   Pepe Lopéz   Borja Rozada   Pepe Lopéz[m] Citroën C3 R5 P
Other major entries
41   Oliver Solberg   Aaron Johnston   Oliver Solberg[n] Volkswagen Polo GTI R5 P
Source:[8]

RouteEdit

The route for the 2020 rally features a total of 304.28 km (189.07 mi) in competitive kilometres,[1] which is 19.55 km (12.15 mi) shorter than the route that was used in the 2019 event.[9] The 2020 route features substantial revisions to the route used in 2019, with the addition of the Malijal — Puimichel, Curbans — Venterol and St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres stages. The Bayons — Bréziers stage returned to the rally after being absent in 2019, while the Valdrôme — Sigottier and Roussieux — Laborel stages were removed from the itinerary.

ItineraryEdit

 
The Col de Braus mountain pass will be contested as the rally's Power Stage.

All dates and times are CET (UTC+1).

Date Time No. Stage name Distance
22 January 16:01 Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km
Leg 1 — 165.54 km
23 January 20:38 SS1 Malijal — Puimichel 17.47 km
22:26 SS2 Bayons — Bréziers 25.49 km
24 January 08:36 SS3 Curbans — Venterol 1 20.02 km
09:56 SS4 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 1 20.68 km
11:21 SS5 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 1 20.59 km
13:54 SS6 Curbans — Venterol 2 20.02 km
15:14 SS7 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 2 20.68 km
16:39 SS8 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 2 20.59 km
Leg 2 — 75.20 km
25 January 09:38 SS9 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km
10:56 SS10 La Bréole — Selonnet 1 20.73 km
14:08 SS11 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km
15:26 SS12 La Bréole — Selonnet 2 20.73 km
Leg 3 — 63.54 km
26 January 08:17 SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km
09:08 SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.36 km
10:55 SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km
12:18 SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 2 [Power Stage] 13.36 km
Source:[1]

ReportEdit

World Rally CarsEdit

Sébastien Ogier and Julien Ingrassia took an early lead on Thursday evening, but Thierry Neuville and Nicolas Gilsoul moved into the lead at the end of the second stage.[10] The lead changed hands several times throughout the opening leg; Elfyn Evans and Scott Martin took the lead on the first morning before Ogier and Ingrassia consolidated their position by the end of the leg.[11] Defending World Champions Ott Tänak and Martin Järveoja suffered a high-speed crash on the first pass through the St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres stage. Their Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC flew off a 40-metre high cliff at 180 km/h (111.8 mph) and rolled end-over-end through a series of trees before landing on the road below. Both Tänak and Järveoja walked away uninjured.[12] Rally leaders changed several times throughout the second leg, with Evans and Martin eventually establishing a lead over teammates Ogier and Ingrassia.[13] The third leg saw Neuville and Gilsoul re-emerge as the leaders, winning all four stages to claim their first win in Monte Carlo.[6] This saw them take twenty-five points for the outright win and five bonus points for winning the Power Stage. Ogier and Ingrassia passed Evans and Martin to finish the Power Stage in second place, only a few thousandths of a second behind Neuville and Gilsoul.

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Event Stage
1 1 11 Thierry Neuville Nicolas Gilsoul Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 3:10:57.6 0.0 25 5
2 2 17 Sébastien Ogier Julien Ingrassia Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:11:10.2 +12.6 18 4
3 3 33 Elfyn Evans Scott Martin Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:11:11.9 +14.3 15 2
4 4 4 Esapekka Lappi Janne Ferm M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3:14:06.6 +3:09.0 12 1
5 5 69 Kalle Rovanperä Jonne Halttunen Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:15:14.8 +4:17.2 10 0
6 6 9 Sébastien Loeb Daniel Elena Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 3:16:02.3 +5:04.7 8 0
7 7 18 Takamoto Katsuta Daniel Barritt Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota Yaris WRC 3:22:25.5 +11:27.9 6 0
8 8 3 Teemu Suninen Jarmo Lehtinen M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3:24:28.0 +13:30.4 4 3
17 9 40 Deividas Jocius Mindaugas Varža M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 3:35:17.5 +24:19.9 0 0
63[o] 10 44 Gus Greensmith Elliott Edmondson M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta WRC 4:38:15.1 +1:27:17.5 0 0
Retired SS4 8 Ott Tänak Martin Järveoja Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC Accident 0 0

Special stagesEdit

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
22 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Ogier / Ingrassia Toyota Yaris WRC 1:57.1 N/A
23 January SS1 Malijal — Puimichel 17.47 km Ogier / Ingrassia Toyota Yaris WRC 9:53.4 Ogier / Ingrassia
SS2 Bayons — Bréziers 25.49 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 16:23.7 Neuville / Gilsoul
24 January SS3 Curbans — Venterol 1 20.02 km Evans / Martin Toyota Yaris WRC 13:22.0
SS4 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 1 20.68 km Evans / Martin Toyota Yaris WRC 11:43.3 Evans / Martin
SS5 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 1 20.59 km Evans / Martin Toyota Yaris WRC 13:00.7
SS6 Curbans — Venterol 2 20.02 km Ogier / Ingrassia Toyota Yaris WRC 13:20.8
SS7 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 2 20.68 km Ogier / Ingrassia Toyota Yaris WRC 11:52.0
SS8 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 2 20.59 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 13:13.1 Ogier / Ingrassia
25 January SS9 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 10:28.8
SS10 La Bréole — Selonnet 1 20.73 km Evans / Martin Toyota Yaris WRC 12:34.4 Evans / Martin
SS11 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 9:34.6 Ogier / Ingrassia
Evans / Martin
SS12 La Bréole — Selonnet 2 20.73 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 12:12.0 Evans / Martin
26 January SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 11:24.1
SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.36 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 9:47.9 Neuville / Gilsoul
SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 11:25.1
SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 2 [Power Stage] 13.36 km Neuville / Gilsoul Hyundai i20 Coupe WRC 9:39.0

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships Manufacturers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points Move Manufacturer Points
1 Thierry Neuville 30 Nicolas Gilsoul 30 Hyundai Shell Mobis WRT 35
2 Sébastien Ogier 22 Julien Ingrassia 22 Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT 33
3 Elfyn Evans 17 Scott Martin 17 M-Sport Ford WRT 20
4 Esapekka Lappi 13 Janne Ferm 13
5 Kalle Rovanperä 10 Jonne Halttunen 10

World Rally Championship-2Edit

Mads Østberg and Torstein Eriksenled the WRC-2 category going into Friday, but a puncture cost him the lead.[14] Ole Christian Veiby and Jonas Andersson then took over the lead until later they also suffered a puncture, which handed the lead back to Østberg and Eriksen.[15] The Norwegian crew extended their lead on Saturday,[16] and eventually won the class.[7]

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Class Event
10 1 20 Mads Østberg Torstein Eriksen PH-Sport Citroën C3 R5 3:25:19.4 0.0 25 1
15 2 23 Adrien Fourmaux Renaud Jamoul M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 3:28:50.8 +3:31.4 18 0
16 3 21 Nikolay Gryazin Yaroslav Fedorov Hyundai Motorsport N Hyundai i20 R5 3:30:45.0 +5:25.6 15 0
19 4 24 Rhys Yates James Morgan M-Sport Ford WRT Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 3:38:22.4 +13:03.0 12 0
Retired SS14 22 Ole Christian Veiby Jonas Andersson Hyundai Motorsport N Hyundai i20 R5 Accident 0 0

Special stagesEdit

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
22 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 2:04.1 N/A
23 January SS1 Malijal — Puimichel 17.47 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 10:31.9 Fourmaux / Jamoul
SS2 Bayons — Bréziers 25.49 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 17:46.0 Østberg / Eriksen
24 January SS3 Curbans — Venterol 1 20.02 km Veiby / Andersson Hyundai i20 R5 14:20.6 Veiby / Andersson
SS4 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 1 20.68 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 12:22.8
SS5 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 1 20.59 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 13:59.9
SS6 Curbans — Venterol 2 20.02 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 14:15.4 Østberg / Eriksen
SS7 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 2 20.68 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 12:37.4
SS8 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 2 20.59 km Veiby / Andersson Hyundai i20 R5 14:07.9
25 January SS9 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 10:51.0
SS10 La Bréole — Selonnet 1 20.73 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 13:24.0
SS11 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 10:13.9
SS12 La Bréole — Selonnet 2 20.73 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 13:04.6
26 January SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 12:01.5
SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.36 km Østberg / Eriksen Citroën C3 R5 10:18.3
SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 12:01.0
SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 2 13.36 km Fourmaux / Jamoul Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II 10:03.9

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships Manufacturers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points Move Manufacturer Points
1 Mads Østberg 25 Torstein Eriksen 25 M-Sport Ford WRT 30
2 Adrien Fourmaux 18 Renaud Jamoul 18 PH-Sport 25
3 Nikolay Gryazin 15 Yaroslav Fedorov 15 Hyundai Motorsport N 15
4 Rhys Yates 12 James Morgan 12
5 Ole Christian Veiby 0 Jonas Andersson 0

World Rally Championship-3Edit

Eric Camilli and François-Xavier Buresi held a 21-second lead over Stéphane Sarrazin and Kévin Parent by the end of Thursday night.[14] Friday's complicated conditions caught out several crews, including those of Sarrazin and Parent, Paulo Nobre and Gabriel Morales, and Umberto Scandola and Guido D'Amore.[15] Camilli and Buresi comfortably won the category after a perfect weekend.[16][7]

ClassificationEdit

Position No. Driver Co-driver Entrant Car Time Difference Points
Event Class Class Event
9 1 27 Eric Camilli François-Xavier Buresi Eric Camilli Citroën C3 R5 3:24:39.8 0.0 25 2
11 2 28 Nicolas Ciamin Yannick Roche Nicolas Ciamin Citroën C3 R5 3:26:01.6 +1:21.8 18 0
12 3 26 Yoann Bonato Benjamin Boulloud Yoann Bonato Citroën C3 R5 3:26:43.6 +2:03.8 15 0
13 4 31 Yohan Rossel Benoît Fulcrand PH-Sport Citroën C3 R5 3:27:17.8 +2:38.0 12 0
14 5 30 Grégoire Munster Louis Louka Grégoire Munster Škoda Fabia R5 3:27:59.6 +3:19.8 10 0
38 6 37 Enrico Brazzoli Maurizio Barone Enrico Brazzoli Škoda Fabia R5 4:08:19.5 +43:39.7 10 0
52 7 36 Miguel Díaz-Aboitiz Diego Sanjuan De Eusebio Miguel Díaz-Aboitiz Škoda Fabia R5 4:16:20.0 +51:40.2 6 0
67[o] 8 34 Umberto Scandola Guido D'Amore Umberto Scandola Hyundai i20 R5 4:48:19.9 +1:23:40.1 4 0
71[o] 9 25 Paulo Nobre Gabriel Morales Paulo Nobre Škoda Fabia R5 4:54:40.7 +1:30:00.9 2 0
Retired SS15 29 "Pedro" Emmanuele Baldaccini "Pedro" Ford Fiesta R5 Mk. II Mechanical 0 0
Retired SS13 38 Pepe Lopéz Borja Rozada Pepe Lopéz Citroën C3 R5 Mechanical 0 0
Retired SS12 35 Andrea Nucita Bernardo Di Caro Andrea Nucita Hyundai i20 R5 Mechanical 0 0
Retired SS6 32 Stéphane Sarrazin Kévin Parent Stéphane Sarrazin Hyundai i20 R5 Accident 0 0

Special stagesEdit

Day Stage Stage name Length Winners Car Time Class leaders
22 January Gap [Shakedown] 3.35 km Ciamin / Roche
Bonato / Boulloud
Lopéz / Rozada
Citroën C3 R5
Citroën C3 R5
Citroën C3 R5
2:07.7 N/A
23 January SS1 Malijal — Puimichel 17.47 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 10:29.1 Camilli / Buresi
SS2 Bayons — Bréziers 25.49 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 17:53.0
24 January SS3 Curbans — Venterol 1 20.02 km Sarrazin / Parent Hyundai i20 R5 14:26.4
SS4 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 1 20.68 km Ciamin / Roche Citroën C3 R5 12:33.5
SS5 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 1 20.59 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 14:01.3
SS6 Curbans — Venterol 2 20.02 km Munster / Louka Škoda Fabia R5 14:23.8
SS7 St. Clement-sur-Durance — Freissinieres 2 20.68 km Ciamin / Roche Citroën C3 R5 12:47.7
SS8 Avançon — Notre-Dame-du-Laus 2 20.59 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 14:16.4
25 January SS9 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 1 16.87 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 10:51.8
SS10 La Bréole — Selonnet 1 20.73 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 13:19.0
SS11 St.-Leger-les-Mélèzes — La-Bâtie-Neuve 2 16.87 km Ciamin / Roche Citroën C3 R5 10:27.9
SS12 La Bréole — Selonnet 2 20.73 km Munster / Louka Škoda Fabia R5 13:14.4
26 January SS13 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 1 18.41 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 12:05.4
SS14 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 1 13.36 km Ciamin / Roche Citroën C3 R5 10:25.0
SS15 La Bollène-Vésubie — Peïra Cava 2 18.41 km Camilli / Buresi Citroën C3 R5 12:03.3
SS16 La Cabanette — Col de Braus 2 13.36 km Bonato / Boulloud Citroën C3 R5 10:10.6

Championship standingsEdit

Pos. Drivers' championships Co-drivers' championships
Move Driver Points Move Co-driver Points
1 Eric Camilli 25 François-Xavier Buresi 25
2 Nicolas Ciamin 18 Yannick Roche 18
3 Yoann Bonato 15 Benjamin Boulloud 15
4 Yohan Rossel 12 Benoît Fulcrand 12
5 Grégoire Munster 10 Louis Louka 10

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Although the rally was run in France, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile does not consider France to be the host nation.
  2. ^ The championship was known as the World Rally Championship-2 Pro in 2019.
  3. ^ The championship was known as the World Rally Championship-2 in 2019.
  4. ^ a b Entry supported by Citroën World Rally Team.
  5. ^ a b Entry prepared by RedGrey Rally Team.
  6. ^ Entry operated by Palmeirinha Rally.
  7. ^ Entry operated by CHL Sport Auto.
  8. ^ Entry operated by Saintéloc Racing.
  9. ^ Entry operated by DG Sport.
  10. ^ Pseudonym of Massimo Pedretti.
  11. ^ Entry supported by MSRT.
  12. ^ Entry also known as Sarrazin Motorsport.
  13. ^ Entry operated by Sports&You.
  14. ^ Entry operated by Sports Racing Technologies.
  15. ^ a b c Under rules unique to the Monte Carlo Rally, only the top sixty crews at the end of the second leg start the third leg. Those outside the top sixty are retired, but are considered to have finished the rally.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "88th Rallye Monte-Carlo". acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  2. ^ Herrero, Daniel (27 September 2019). "Australia drops off WRC calendar in 2020". speedcafe.com. Speedcafe. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  3. ^ "Sunday in Monte-Carlo:Ogier claims sixth straight win". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  4. ^ Evans, David (20 November 2019). "Citroen ends WRC programme, cites Ogier's exit as reason". motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  5. ^ a b "WRC 2 Monte-Carlo: Greensmith secures Pro victory". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 27 January 2019. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Neuville seals revenge win in Monte-Carlo". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 26 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  7. ^ a b c "WRC 2 in Monte: Østberg takes top spot". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 26 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  8. ^ "88e Rallye Automobile Monte-Carlo Entry List" (PDF). acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. 13 January 2020. Retrieved 13 January 2020.
  9. ^ "Rallye Monte-Carlo – Edition 2019". acm.mc. Automobile Club de Monaco. Retrieved 31 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Neuville fires early warning to Monte rivals". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  11. ^ "Ogier snatches Monte-Carlo lead". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  12. ^ "SS4/5: Evans leads, Tänak crashes". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  13. ^ "Advantage Evans in Monte-Carlo Thriller". wrc.com. WRC Promoter GmbH. 25 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
  14. ^ a b "Thursday in Monte-Carlo: Mads makes his mark in WRC 2". wrc.com. WRC. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  15. ^ a b "Friday in Monte-Carlo: Østberg out in front". wrc.com. WRC. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2020.
  16. ^ a b "Saturday in Monte-Carlo: Østberg extends lead". wrc.com. WRC. 25 January 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2020.

External linksEdit

Previous rally:
2019 Rally Australia (2019)
2020 FIA World Rally Championship Next rally:
2020 Rally Sweden
Previous rally:
2019 Monte Carlo Rally
2020 Monte Carlo Rally Next rally:
2021 Monte Carlo Rally