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2018 24 Hours of Le Mans

The 86th 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 86e 24 Heures du Mans) was an automobile endurance racing event held from 16 to 17 June 2018 at the Circuit de la Sarthe at Le Mans, France. It was the 86th running of the event, as organised by the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) since 1923. The race was the second round and the premier event of the 2018–19 FIA World Endurance Championship, with thirty-six of the race's sixty entries contesting the championship. Approximately 256,900 people attended the race. A test day was held two weeks prior to the race on 3 June.

2018 24 Hours of Le Mans
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Index: Races | Winners
The race-winning No. 8 Toyota TS050 Hybrid
Layout of the Circuit de la Sarthe

The No. 8 Toyota TS050 Hybrid of Sébastien Buemi, Kazuki Nakajima and Fernando Alonso began from pole position after Nakajima recorded the fastest lap time in the third qualifying session. It and the sister No. 7 Toyota of Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and José María López exchanged the lead for the majority of the first half of the race until Buemi took a one-minute stop-and-go penalty for speeding in a slow zone that was enforced for an accident during the night. Alonso and Nakajima in the No. 8 Toyota retook the lead from the sister No. 7 car in the 16th hour and maintained it for the rest of the race to win. It was Alonso, Buemi and Nakajima's first Le Mans win and Toyota's first after 20 previous attempts. The sister Toyota of Conway, Kobayashi and López finished two laps behind in second, and the No. 3 Rebellion R13 of Thomas Laurent, Gustavo Menezes and Mathias Beche completed the race podium in third.

The Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) class was led for 360 consecutive laps by the No. 26 G-Drive Racing Oreca 07 of Roman Rusinov, Andrea Pizzitola and Jean-Éric Vergne and was the first car to finish the race. However it was subsequently disqualified for running an illegal refuelling component and G-Drive lost an appeal. The class victory was taken by the No. 36 Signatech Alpine of Nicolas Lapierre, Pierre Thiriet and André Negrão. The No. 39 Graff-SO24 driven by Vincent Capillaire, Jonathan Hirschi and Tristan Gommendy was second and the No. 32 United Autosports Ligier JS P217 of Hugo de Sadeleer, Will Owen and Juan Pablo Montoya third. On its 70th anniversary Porsche won both of the Le Mans Grand Touring Professional (LMGTE) categories with the No. 91 911 RSR of Michael Christensen, Kévin Estre and Laurens Vanthoor, ahead of Richard Lietz, Gianmaria Bruni and Frédéric Makowiecki's No. 92 in Le Mans Grand Touring Professional (LMGTE Pro) and Dempsey-Proton's No. 77 driven by Matt Campbell, Christian Ried and Julien Andlauer won in Le Mans Grand Touring Amateur (LMGTE Am).

The result increased Alonso, Buemi and Nakajima's lead in the LMP Drivers' Championship to 20 points over their teammates Conway, Kobayashi and López in second. Beche, Laurent and Menezes retained third place and Lapierre, Thiriet and Negrão's victory in LMP2 moved them to fourth. In the GTE Drivers' Championship Christensen and Estre took the lead from Billy Johnson, Stefan Mücke and Olivier Pla. Toyota further extended their lead over Rebellion Racing in the LMP1 Teams' Championship to 27 points as Porsche went further ahead of Ford in the GTE Manufacturers' Championship with six races remaining in the season.

BackgroundEdit

 
The Circuit de la Sarthe, where the race was held.

The dates for the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans was confirmed at a meeting of the FIA World Motor Sport Council in its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on 19 June 2017.[1] It was the 86th edition of the event,[1] and the second of eight scheduled automobile endurance racing events of the 2018–19 FIA World Endurance Championship.[2] The race was conceived at the 1922 Paris Motor Show by the automotive journalist Charles Faroux to Georges Durand, the president of the automotive group, the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO) and the industrialist Emile Coquile as a means of prompting car manufacturers to test the reliability and fuel-efficiency of their racing vehicles and equipment.[3][4] It was not held in 1936 because of a general labour strike during the Great Depression,[5] and heavy damage sustained to the circuit in World War II cancelled it from 1940 to 1948.[4] The 24 Hours of Le Mans is considered one of the world's most prestigious motor races and is part of the Triple Crown of Motorsport.[6]

Before the race Toyota drivers Fernando Alonso, Sébastien Buemi and Kazuki Nakajima led the LMP Drivers' Championship with 26 points, eight ahead of their teammates Mike Conway, Kamui Kobayashi and José María López in second place and a further three in front of Mathias Beche, Thomas Laurent and Gustavo Menezes of the Rebellion team. The ByKolles trio of Tom Dillmann, Dominik Kraihamer and Oliver Webb were fourth with 12 points and SMP Racing's Mikhail Aleshin and Vitaly Petrov completed the top five with 10 points.[7] In the GTE Drivers' Championship Billy Johnson, Stefan Mücke and Olivier Pla of Ford Chip Ganassi Racing led on 25 points from the Porsche duo of Michael Christensen and Kévin Estre in second and AF Corse's Davide Rigon and Sam Bird third.[7] Toyota (26 points) led the LMP1 Teams' Championship by 11 points over Rebellion in second and ByKolles was a further three points behind in third as Porsche led Ford by four points in the GTE Manufacturers' Championship.[7]

Circuit changesEdit

During the winter following the 2017 24 Hours of Le Mans, modifications were made to the Porsche Curves section of the Circuit de la Sarthe to increase safety. Barriers on the inside of the final right-hand corner were dismantled and relocated further away from the circuit, allowing for the construction of paved run-off area and escape roads. This same alteration had been done on the barriers outside the corner the previous year. This modification re-profiled the corner slightly, shortening the lap distance by 3 metres (9.8 ft). The ACO also constructed a new starting line gantry 145 metres (476 ft) further up the main straight to allow more cars on the straight at the start of the race. The finish line and all timing beacons however remain at the previous starting line at the exit of the Ford Chicane.[8]

EntriesEdit

Automatic entriesEdit

Automatic entry invitations are earned by teams that won their class in the previous running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, or won championships in the European Le Mans Series, Asian Le Mans Series, and the Michelin GT3 Le Mans Cup. The second-place finisher in the European Le Mans Series Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance (LMGTE) championship also earns an automatic invitation. Two participants from the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship are chosen by the series to be automatic entries by the ACO regardless of their performance or category. As invitations are granted to teams, they were allowed to change their cars from the previous year to the next, but not allowed to change their category. The LMGTE class invitations from the European and Asian Le Mans Series are allowed to choose *between the Pro and Am categories. European Le Mans Series' LMP3 champion is required to field an entry in Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) while the Asian Le Mans Series Le Mans Prototype 3 (LMP3) champion may choose between LMP2 or Le Mans Grand Touring Endurance Amateur (LMGTE Am). The Michelin Le Mans Cup LMP3 champion does not receive an automatic entry and the Grand Touring 3 (GT3) champion is limited to the LMGTE Am category.[9]

The ACO announced its initial list of automatic entries on 5 February 2018.[9] Porsche LMP Team did not continue in the FIA World Endurance Championship after the 2017 season while FIST-Team AAI opted to concentrate on their GT3 entries.[9] JDC-Miller Motorsports, which was invited via driver Misha Goikhberg winning the Jim Trueman Award as "the top sportsman" in the Daytona Prototype International (DPi) category of the 2017 WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, told ACO officials on 9 February that it was to forgo its automatic invitation due to financial trouble concerning its entry.[10]

Reason invited LMP1 LMP2 LMGTE Pro LMGTE Am
1st in the 24 Hours of Le Mans   Porsche LMP Team   Jackie Chan DC Racing   Aston Martin Racing   JMW Motorsport
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP2 and LMGTE)   G-Drive Racing   JMW Motorsport
2nd in the European Le Mans Series (LMGTE)   TF Sport
1st in the European Le Mans Series (LMP3)   United Autosports
WeatherTech SportsCar Championship at-large entries   JDC-Miller Motorsports   Keating Motorsport
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP2 and GT)   Jackie Chan DC Racing X Jota   FIST-Team AAI
1st in the Asian Le Mans Series (LMP3)
2nd in the Asian Le Mans Series (GT)   FIST-Team AAI
1st in the Michelin Le Mans Cup (GT3)   Ebimotors
Source:[9]

Entry listEdit

In conjunction with the announcement of entries for the 2018–19 FIA World Endurance Championship and the 2018 European Le Mans Series, the ACO announced the full 60 car entry list, plus nine reserves during a press conference at the Rétromobile Show in Paris on 9 February.[11] In addition to the 36 guaranteed entries from the World Endurance Championship, 13 came from the European Le Mans Series, seven from the WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, three from the Asian Le Mans Series and a single one-off entry only competing at Le Mans. The field was split evenly with 30 cars in each of the combined LMP and LMGTE categories.[12]

Garage 56Edit

The ACO intended to continue the Garage 56 concept, started in 2012. Garage 56 allows a 56th entry to the race, using the rigours of the 24 Hours of Le Mans to test new technology. Panoz and Green4U Technologies announced during the 2017 24 Hours of Le Mans weekend they intended to enter its Green4U Panoz Racing GT-EV car in the 2018 race. The all-wheel drive car intended to utilise two electric motors on each of its axles with a swappable battery lasting between 90 to 110 mi (140 to 180 km) within a tandem style LMP body.[13] On 8 February, the ACO confirmed the Garage 56 concept would not be continued for 2018 due to a lack of feasible options.[14]

ReservesEdit

Nine reserves were initially nominated by the ACO, limited to the LMP2 (six) and LMGTE Am (three) categories.[11] ARC Bratislava announced the termination of its European Le Mans Series LMP2 programme on 11 February after its Ligier JS P217 was placed eighth in the reserves list and leaving the team unlikely to be promoted to the race entry.[15] Six days later, IDEC Sport withdrew its reserve JS P217 so that the team could concentrate on improving the performance of its entered No. 28 car.[16] By the start of the test day, two reserves remained on the list after five of the seven entries withdrew: KCMG Dallara P217 and a Racing Engineering Oreca 07.[17]

Pre-race balance of performance changesEdit

The FIA Endurance Committee altered the equivalence of technology in the LMP classes and the balance of performance in the LMGTE categories to try and create parity within them. All non-hybrid LMP chassis had their fuel flow of petrol per hour reduced from 110 kg/h (240 lb/h) to 108 kg/h (240 lb/h) while the Toyota TS050 Hybrids had no performance alterations.[18]

For the LMGTE categories the Aston Martin Vantage GTE received an extra 5 kg (11 lb) of weight and a minor reduction in turbocharger boost pressure as The BMW M8 GTE had 13 kg (29 lb) of weight added and also a reduction of power to lower their performances. The Porsche 911 RSR received a reduction in performance with a 0.6 mm (0.024 in) smaller air restrictor on the intake of its engine, the Ferrari 488 GTE had an extra 11 kg (24 lb) of weight added to it and the Ford GT received an additional 12 kg (26 lb) of weight and an increase in turbocharger boost pressure. In the LMGTE Am class the Aston Martin and Porsche had their top speeds lowered with a smaller air restrictor and the Ferrari had its turbocharger boost pressure reduced.[19]

TestingEdit

 
Fernando Alonso (pictured in 2017) recorded the fastest overall lap time during testing

A test day was held on 3 June, two weeks prior to the race, and required all entrants for the race to participate in eight hours of track time divided into two sessions.[20] Toyota led the morning session with a 3 minutes 21.468 seconds lap from Alonso's No. 8 TS050.[21] The fastest non-hybrid car was Laurent in the No. 3 Rebellion R13, ahead of the second Toyota of Conway, the sister Rebellion of Bruno Senna,[21] and the No. 17 SMP BR Engineering BR1 driven by Stéphane Sarrazin.[22] Oreca vehicles led the LMP2 category with seven cars at the top of the timing charts, with the No. 26 G-Drive entry driven by the team's reserve driver Alexandre Imperatori seven-tenths of a second ahead of the No. 48 IDEC Sport of Paul-Loup Chatin.[22] Ford took the first four positions in the LMGTE Pro class, the No. 67 of Andy Priaulx leading Mücke in the No. 66 with a lap of 3 minutes and 53.008 seconds.[21] Late in the session, the No. 95 Aston Martin of Marco Sørensen and Harrison Newey's No. 35 SMP Dallara made contact in traffic between Mulsanne and Indianapolis corners, causing Sørensen to crash heavily against a barrier beside the circuit and prematurely end the session with 51 minutes remaining.[22] Sorensen was unhurt; he was transported to the circuit's medical centre for a precautionary check before being released and Aston Martin switched to a spare chassis.[23] The Clearwater Racing Ferrari was fastest in the LMGTE Am category with a lap of 3 minutes and 58.967 seconds from driver Keita Sawa.[21]

The second test session started half an hour earlier than scheduled to give teams more time on the circuit.[24] Toyota again led from the start with a fast lap from Kobayashi in the No. 7, followed by Alonso's 3 minutes and 19.066 seconds time to top the session. Beche improved the No. 3 Rebellion's lap to duplicate its first session result in second place and the car again separated the Toyotas. The second Rebellion of André Lotterer set a lap late in the session to go fourth, ahead of the No. 11 SMP BR1 of Vitaly Petrov.[25] Nathanaël Berthon improved the fastest lap in LMP2, moving DragonSpeed ahead of Chatin's IDEC Sport and G-Drive's Jean-Éric Vergne and Matthieu Vaxivière. Patrick Pilet in the No. 93 Porsche and Gianmaria Bruni's No. 91 car passed Priaulx's No. 66 Ford and the No. 67 of Olivier Pla in LMGTE Pro. Another Porsche in LMGTE Am, driven by Julien Andlauer for Dempsey-Proton, overtook Sawa's fastest time from the morning session to be ahead of Giancarlo Fisichella's Spirit of Race Ferrari.[24] Two safety car periods were required after separate crashes by Alessandro Pier Guidi's No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari at Tetre Rouge corner and António Félix da Costa's No. 82 BMW in the Porsche Curves.[25]

Post-testing balance of performance changesEdit

Following testing the ACO altered the balance of performance for a second time in the LMGTE Pro and Am categories. The Aston Martin Vantage GTE received an increase in performance with its turbocharger boost pressure raised and a 4 l (0.88 imp gal; 1.1 US gal) increase in maximum fuel volume. BMW and Ford had their car's performance raised with a minor increase in turbocharger boost ratio as the Ford's fuel allocation was lowered to 2 l (0.44 imp gal; 0.53 US gal). The Chevrolet Corvette C7.R had 10 kg (22 lb) of ballast added as BMW and Ford received weight increases. Porsche had no performance changes. In LMGTE Am the Aston Martin Vantage was given an increase of 2 l (0.44 imp gal; 0.53 US gal). Porsche and Ferrari had no performance alterations.[26]

PracticeEdit

A single four-hour free practice session on 13 June was available to the teams before the three qualifying sessions.[20] Rain forecast for 14 June prompted several teams to complete laps at full racing speed in anticipation of the first qualifying session determining the starting grid for the race.[27] Toyota led from the start once again, with Kobayashi claiming the fastest lap of the session in the final 20 minutes with a 3 minutes and 18.718 seconds effort, half a second faster than Buemi in second. Rebellion and DragonSpeed's fastest laps from Laurent and Ben Hanley put them third and fourth and Jenson Button's No. 17 SMP BR1 completed the top five.[28] Orecas took the first five positions in the LMP2 category with a fastest lap of 3 minutes and 26.529 seconds from Vergne, followed by Chatin for IDEC Sport, Loïc Duval of TDS Racing, Berthon of DragonSpeed and Tristan Gommendy for Graff.[29]

Jackie Chan DC Racing's No. 37 Oreca of Nabil Jeffri damaged its right-front corner in a crash at Indianapolis corner mid-way through the session and the car did not return to the circuit.[28][29] Porsches led the first three positions in the LMGTE Pro class with a best lap of 3 minutes and 50.819 seconds from Laurens Vanthoor in the No. 92 RSR leading the time sheets until Pilet's No. 93 overtook him with 20 minutes to go. Pla was the fastest non Porsche in fourth and Miguel Molina's No. 71 AF Corse Ferrari was fifth. Matteo Cairoli helped Porsche to be fastest in LMGTE Am, ahead of Ben Barker's Gulf car and Fisichella.[29] Pilet had an accident at the exit to the first Mulsanne Chicane, damaging the car against a tyre wall and scattering debris on the circuit. A local slow zone was required after Michael Wainwright beached the No. 86 Gulf Porsche in a gravel trap at the Dunlop Curve.[28]

QualifyingEdit

The first qualifying session began late Wednesday night under dry conditions,[30] as Toyota again led the time sheets early on with a lap from López in the No. 7 entry, followed by Nakajima's 3 minutes and 17.270 seconds time eight minutes in to top the session. Neither car improved their lap times over the rest of the session, giving the No. 8 provisional pole position. The fastest non-hybrid car was Sarrazin's No. 17 SMP BR1 in third, followed by Senna in the No. 1 Rebellion R13 and the second Rebellion driven by Menezes. The fastest LMP2 lap time was a 3 minutes and 24.956 seconds lap from Chatin in the IDEC Oreca to edge out the early category pace setter Duval for TDS Racing. Vergne of G-Drive, DragonSpeed's Pastor Maldonado and Nicolas Lapierre for Signatech Alpine were third to fifth in class.[31] Porsche took the first two positions in the LMGTE Pro class with a time of 3 minutes and 47.504 seconds from Bruni to reset the category lap record at his first attempt. Je lost control of the rear of the No. 92 into the Dunlop Curves and spun through 180 degrees into a gravel trap soon after.[32] Christensen in second was a tenth of a second faster than the two Fords of Pla and Mücke. The fastest Ferrari was fifth from a lap by Per Guidi. Cairoli's No. 88 Dempsey-Proton RSR helped Porsche to lead the LMGTE Am class with a 3 minutes and 50.669 seconds lap, followed by the sister No. 77 car of Matt Campbell and Barker's No. 86 Gulf entry.[31]

 
Kazuki Nakajima (pictured in 2012) took pole position for Toyota in the third qualifying session.

Thursday's first qualifying session saw three stoppages for crashes. Sven Müller caused rear damage to the No. 94 Porsche against a tyre wall at Indianapolis corner and Priaulx spun his Ford GT at the entry to Tetre Rouge corner with his left-rear wheel on the grass and damaged the rear of the car in a collision with a tyre barrier. He was able to restart the car but the damage to the barriers caused a red flag. This was followed by the right-rear suspension on Lapierre's Signatech failing on a kerb and sending the car into a gravel trap. He continued to the pit lane and the session was stopped for a second time for nine minutes to allow track marshals to clear gravel strewn on the circuit. The session ended with 38 minutes remaining after Giorgio Sernagiotto crashed the No. 47 Cetilar Vilorba Corse Dallara heavily against a tyre barrier opposite the first Mulsanne chicane due to a front-left puncture. Sernagiotto was unhurt and was transported to the medical centre for a mandatory check-up.[33] Alonso led the session with a lap of 3 minutes and 18.021 seconds, which was not an improvement on co-driver Nakajima's lap from the first session. The only two LMP1 entries to improve their lap times was the No. 6 CEFC TRSM Ginetta G60-LT-P1 of Alex Brundle and the sister No. 5 of Charlie Robertson. IDEC Sport maintained its advantage in the LMP2 class while Porsche continued to hold sway in the LMGTE Pro and Am categories. Fisichella's Spirit of Race Ferrari overtook the No. 86 Gulf Porsche for third in LMGTE Am.[33]

With the multiple stoppages in qualifying, the third session was expanded by half an hour in order to give teams more time on the circuit.[34] Early in the session Nakajima set a new fastest time of 3 minutes and 15.377 seconds without slower traffic impeding him.[35] He held the top of the time charts to take Toyota's fourth pole position at Le Mans and the first for Alonso, Buemi and Nakajima.[36] The crew of the No. 7 Toyota could not improve its fastest lap and joined the No. 8 on the front row of the grid. Rebellion were third and fifth with Senna's No. 1 R13 ahead of Laurent's No. 3 after officials invalidated the latter's fastest time for failing to stop at a red light instructing him to enter the scrutineering bay.[34] The two cars were separated by Sarrazin's No. 17 SMP BR1. DragonSpeed began from sixth position. In LMP2, Duval in the TDS Oreca displaced the IDEC of Chatin to take provisional pole position in the category until his fastest time was deleted for also missing the red light to enter the scrutineering bay. Berthon for DragonSpeed began from second and the G-Drive of Vergne was third. Porsche secured pole position in both of the LMGTE classes with the No. 91 of Bruni securing it in Pro and Cairoli's No. 88 Dempsey-Proton courtesy of their laps from the first session. The No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari of Per Guidi led the session and moved to fourth in LMGTE Pro as Barker improved the No. 86 Gulf's lap to come within six-tenths of a second Dempsey-Proton's No. 88 car. The slow zone procedure was used after Matt Griffin ran straight and beached the No. 61 Clearwater Ferrari in a gravel trap at Indianapolis corner from which he was extricated by track marshals.[37]

Post-qualifyingEdit

Following qualifying the ACO altered the balance of performance in the LMGTE categories for the third time. 10 kg (22 lb) of ballast was removed from the BMW M8 and the Aston Martin Vantage while the Corvette C7.R was made 5 kg (11 lb) lighter. The Porsche 911 had its weight increased by 10 kg (22 lb) and the Ford GTs were lightened by 8 kg (18 lb). The Ferrari 488 received an 1 l (0.22 imp gal; 0.26 US gal) increase in fuel capacity. In LMGTE Am, Aston Martin received a 10 kg (22 lb) decrease of weight and Porsche had 10 kg (22 lb) added to their cars. Ferrari had no performance changes. The world governing body of motor racing, the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), restricted all LMGTE Pro cars to a maximum of 14 laps per stint.[38]

Qualifying resultsEdit

Pole position winners in each class are indicated in bold and by a   The fastest time set by each entry is denoted in gray.

Pos. Class No. Team Qualifying 1[39] Qualifying 2[40] Qualifying 3[41] Gap Grid
1 LMP1 8 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:17.270 3:18.021 3:15.377 1 
2 LMP1 7 Toyota Gazoo Racing 3:17.377 3:19.860 3:17.523 +2.000 2
3 LMP1 1 Rebellion Racing 3:19.662 3:23.261 3:19.449 +4.072 3
4 LMP1 17 SMP Racing 3:19.483 3:27.288 3:22.121 +4.106 4
5 LMP1 3 Rebellion Racing 3:19.945 3:22.000 3:24.156 +4.568 5
6 LMP1 10 DragonSpeed 3:21.110 4:05.947 3:23.413 +5.733 6
7 LMP1 11 SMP Racing 3:21.408 3:22.548 No time +6.031 7
8 LMP1 4 ByKolles Racing Team 3:22.505 3:25.330 3:42.221 +7.128 8
9 LMP1 6 CEFC TRSM Racing 3:30.339 3:24.343 3:23.757 +8.380 9
10 LMP2 48 IDEC Sport 3:24.956 3:29.270 3:24.842[A 1] +9.465 10 
11 LMP2 31 DragonSpeed 3:26.508 3:30.168 3:24.883 +9.506 11
12 LMP2 26 G-Drive Racing 3:26.447 3:27.975 3:25.160 +9.780 12
13 LMP2 28 TDS Racing 3:25.240 3:25.291 3:38.752[A 2] +9.863 13
14 LMP1 5 CEFC TRSM Racing 3:30.481[A 2] 3:25.268 3:32.100 +9.891 14
15 LMP2 23 Panis Barthez Competition 3:29.421 3:28.008 3:25.376 +9.999 15
16 LMP2 36 Signatech Alpine Matmut 3:26.681 3:28.069 3:27.297 +11.304 16
17 LMP2 39 Graff-SO24 3:29.860 3:26.701 3:29.696 +11.324 17
18 LMP2 22 United Autosports 3:26.772 3:32.989 3:27.646 +11.395 18
19 LMP2 38 Jackie Chan DC Racing 3:27.999 3:31.581 3:27.120 +11.743 19
20 LMP2 37 Jackie Chan DC Racing 3:27.468 3:40.074 3:27.226 +11.849 20
21 LMP2 40 G-Drive Racing 3:31.291 3:27.280 3:27.503 +11.903 21
22 LMP2 47 Cetilar Villorba Corse 3:27.993 3:28.292 No time +12.616 22
23 LMP2 29 Racing Team Nederland 3:28.556 3:32.343 3:28.111 +12.734 23
24 LMP2 32 United Autosports 3:30.347 3:28.159 3:29.299 +12.782 24
25 LMP2 35 SMP Racing 3:28.629 3:32.178 3:32.432 +13.252 25
26 LMP2 34 Jackie Chan DC Racing 3:33.755 3:36.004 3:29.474 +14.097 26
27 LMP2 44 Eurasia Motorsport 3:35.385[A 2] 3:39.949 3:33.585 +18.208 27
28 LMP2 33 Jackie Chan DC Racing 3:35.237 3:36.604 3:36.517[A 1] +19.860 28
29 LMP2 50 Larbre Compétition 3:38.206 3:39.569 3:39.401 +22.829 29
30 LMP2 25 Algarve Pro Racing 3:44.177 3:46.772 3:39.518 +24.141 30
31 LMGTE Pro 91 Porsche GT Team 3:47.504 3:51.150 3:50.141 +32.127 31 
32 LMGTE Pro 92 Porsche GT Team 3:49.097 3:51.101 3:51.631 +33.720 32
33 LMGTE Pro 66 Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK 3:49.181 3:52.849 3:50.166 +33.804 33
34 LMGTE Pro 51 AF Corse 3:49.854 3:53.032 3:49.494 +34.117 34
35 LMGTE Pro 68 Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA 3:49.582 3:53.352 3:50.706 +34.205 35
36 LMGTE Pro 93 Porsche GT Team 3:50.261 3:49.621 3:49.589 +34.212 36
37 LMGTE Pro 69 Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA 3:50.593 3:52.298 3:49.761 +34.384 37
38 LMGTE Pro 94 Porsche GT Team 3:50.089 No time No time +34.712 38
39 LMGTE Pro 63 Corvette Racing – GM 3:50.789 3:52.994 3:50.242 +34.865 39
40 LMGTE Pro 71 AF Corse 3:50.669 3:53.998 3:50.246 +34.869 40
41 LMGTE Pro 67 Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK 3:50.429 3:53.883 3:52.292 +35.052 41
42 LMGTE Pro 82 BMW Team MTEK 3:50.579 3:53.999 3:52.123 +35.202 42
43 LMGTE Pro 81 BMW Team MTEK 3:50.596 3:55.150 3:53.078 +35.219 43
44 LMGTE Am 88 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:50.728 4:09.946 3:56.232 +35.351 44 
45 LMGTE Pro 64 Corvette Racing – GM 3:50.952 3:52.923 3:51.124 +35.575 45
46 LMGTE Pro 52 AF Corse 3:52.112 3:52.572 3:50.957 +35.580 46
47 LMGTE Am 86 Gulf Racing UK 3:52.517 4:03.603 3:51.391 +36.014 47
48 LMGTE Am 77 Dempsey-Proton Racing 3:51.930 4:09.835 No time +36.553 48
49 LMGTE Am 54 Spirit of Race 3:52.756 3:51.956 3:56.496 +36.579 49
50 LMGTE Pro 97 Aston Martin Racing 3:52.486 3:55.424 3:53.534 +37.109 50
51 LMGTE Am 56 Team Project 1 3:52.985 3:58.235 3:54.406 +37.608 51
52 LMGTE Am 90 TF Sport 3:55.661 4:01.710 3:53.070 +37.693 52
53 LMGTE Am 80 Ebimotors 3:55.569 3:58.072 3:53.402 +38.025 53
54 LMGTE Am 61 Clearwater Racing 3:55.076 3:55.727 3:53.409 +38.032 54
55 LMGTE Am 84 JMW Motorsport 3:54.384 3:53.439 3:58.615 +38.062 55
56 LMGTE Pro 95 Aston Martin Racing 3:54.780 3:56.630 3:53.523 +38.146 56
57 LMGTE Am 98 Aston Martin Racing 3:54.307 3:58.707 3:53.817 +38.440 57
58 LMGTE Am 85 Keating Motorsport 3:54.000 3:58.661 3:54.668 +38.623 58
59 LMGTE Am 99 Proton Competition 4:03.107 3:54.720 3:54.953 +39.343 59
60 LMGTE Am 70 MR Racing 3:54.951 4:02.540 3:55.343 +39.574 60

Notes

  1. ^ a b The No. 33 DC Racing Ligier and No. 48 IDEC Oreca had their fastest lap time deleted for failing to slow to 80 km/h in a Slow Zone.[42]
  2. ^ a b c The No. 28 TDS Oreca, No. 44 Eurasia Ligier, and No. 6 TRSM Ginetta-Mechachrome had several lap times deleted for failing to stop for a mandatory weight check. These included their fastest times of the session.[43][44][45]

Warm-upEdit

The cars took to the circuit on Saturday morning for a 45-minute warm-up session in dry and sunny weather conditions.[20] The No. 7 Toyota driven by Kobayashi set the fastest lap time of 3 minutes and 18.687 seconds, ahead of the sister Toyota of Buemi in second. Hanley was the fastest non-hybrid LMP1 in the DragonSpeed BR1 and was third. The No. 17 SMP BR1 was fourth-fastest and the No. 1 Rebellion R13 fifth. The fastest LMP2 lap was recorded by Ricky Taylor in Jackie Chan DC Racing's No. 34 Ligier at 3 minutes and 29.466 seconds to displace the No. 26 G-Drive Oreca of Vergne from the top of the category time sheets and Lapierre finished second in the Signatech Alpine. Scott Dixon, driving the No. 69 Ford GT, was the quickest driver in LMGTE Pro with Jeroen Bleekemolen in Keating Motorsport's Ferrari the fastest competitor in LMGTE Am.[46]

RaceEdit

Start and first hoursEdit

 
The start of the 2018 24 Hours of Le Mans

The conditions on the grid were dry and sunny before the race; the air temperature was between 15 to 22 °C (59 to 72 °F) and the track temperature ranged from 14 to 31 °C (57 to 88 °F).[47] Approximately 256,900 people attended the race.[48] The French tricolour was waved at 15:00 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00),[20] by multiple Grand Slam tennis champion Rafael Nadal to start the race,[49] led by starting pole sitter Buemi in the No. 8 Toyota.[50] At the start of the parade lap, a misfiring engine and a spin on cold tyres at the Dunlop Curve dropped Tom Dillmann's No. 4 ByKolles to the rear of the field.[50] Lotterer in the No. 1 Rebellion had a mounting failure that detached its front bodywork and removed downforce from the car entering the Dunlop Curve. It struck the rear of Hanley's DragonSpeed BR1.[51] Both cars dropped down the race order. Conway passed Buemi to lead the first four laps until Buemi retook the position on the fifth lap. Rain fell during this period though it was not heavy enough to affect the race.[52] Laurent challenged and passed Sarrazin's No. 17 BR1 for third on the Mulsanne Straight before Sarrazin returned to third place by slipstreaming past Laurent into Mulsanne corner. The first hour ended with Vergne passing Duval for the lead of LMP2 and Chatin fell to third. The Porsche cars of Bruni and Estre duelled for first place in LMGTE Pro as Barker overtook Carioli for the top of LMGTE Am.[53]

Buemi relinquished the lead to his teammate Conway after the No. 8 Toyota made an unscheduled pit stop to have its rear crash structure replaced and the car rejoined the race in second position.[54][55] Berthon ceded fourth place in LMP2 after the DragonSpeed Oreca's front-right wheel detached on the approach to Arnage corner and losing three laps as a new wheel hub assembly was installed onto the car. 1 hour and 40 minutes in Wainwright's No. 86 Gulf Porsche lost control under braking and crashed into an Armco steel barrier on the outside at Indianapolis turn with its left-hand corner, requiring a slow zone between Mulsanne and Arnage corners to recover the car and to repair the barrier.[55] Conway used the slow zone and a routine pit stop from his teammate Buemi to return to the lead on lap 32.[56] As the second hour ended, Sébastien Bourdais's No. 68 Ford, who moved to second place in LMGTE Pro after a pit stop sequence, was passed by Frédéric Makowiecki's No. 92 Porsche entering the Mulsanne corner for the position and the No. 77 Dempsey-Proton led in LMGTE Am.[55] He continued to advance through the order and overtook his Porsche teammate Vanthoor for the lead of LMGTE Pro with the two cars running nose-to-tail.[57] During a pit stop to relieve Buemi, television footage appeared to show Alonso reversing in the pit lane to pass a LMGTE vehicle parked ahead of him. Footage released later confirmed Alonso had not reversed and the No. 8 was pushed backwards by mechanics, preventing the car from being disqualified.[58]

In the fourth hour, Alonso caught and overtook his teammate López in the Porsche Curves to retake the lead in the No. 8 Toyota. Bourdais used a battle between the Porsches of Vanthoor and Makowiecki on the Mulsanne Straight to move into the lead of LMGTE Pro. Not long after the left-rear tyre on Gabriel Aubry's No. 38 Jackie Chan DC Oreca failed on the Mulsanne Straight, littering the track with debris and removing the car's front-left fender. Aubry retained control of the vehicle to allow him to return to the pit lane and the incident required the deployment of the safety cars to slow the race.[59] The safety cars were withdrawn after fifteen minutes and racing resumed.[60] The safety cars had separated the LMGTE Pro field, the No. 92 Porsche led by more than a minute from the sister No. 91 due to Richard Lietz being required to remain in the pit lane. Although López made an unscheduled pit stop to replace a left-rear puncture, he took the lead from his teammate Alonso and led by four-and-a-half seconds.[61] Antonio Giovinazzi in the No. 52 AF Corse Ferrari used the outside of the track to overtake Dixon for second in LMGTE Pro. Soon after Dominik Kraihamer was lapping slower LMGTE cars in the Porsche Curves when the rear of the No. 4 ByKolles and the front of the No. 80 Ebimotors Porsche made contact. His rear wing was removed and the ByKolles was sent into a heavy collision against a concrete wall at Corvette corner. Kraihamer was unhurt; the crash caused the deployment of the safety cars for half an hour as marshals repaired the barrier and cleared the track of debris.[62][63]

Early evening to nightEdit

As the safety car period ended the Toyota cars of López and Alonso scythed their way through heavy traffic. Toyota then invoked team orders on López to allow Alonso to re-assume the lead entering Arnage turn one lap later.[62] The safety cars had split up the field in LMGTE Pro, leaving Nick Catsburg's No. 81 BMW in second place and the No. 93 and No. 91 Porsches of Earl Bamber and Lietz in third and fourth.[63] Juan Pablo Montoya, driving the No. 23 United Autosports Ligier, crashed into a tyre barrier at Indianapolis corner and activating a local slow zone. Marshals extricated the car from the gravel and Montoya continued.[64] Pierre Thiriet was caught out by the exit of the slow zone and lost control of the rear of the Signatech Alpine at Mulsanne turn and fell to fourth in LMP2.[65] In the seventh hour, Pilet and Bruni overtook the BMW of Martin Tomczyk for second and third in LMGTE Pro as Romain Dumas' No. 94 slowed in the Porsche Curves and retired with a front-right suspension bracket failure. Not long after Paul Dalla Lana was about to enter the pit lane when he lost control of the No. 98 Aston Martin and crashed heavily against a tyre barrier at the entrance in the Porsche Curves. The damage to the car was significant enough for it to be retired and required a local slow zone. Vergne used the slow zone to increase his lead at the front of the LMP2 field to almost two minutes and Kobayashi closed to within less than a second of Nakajima.[66][67]

As night fell, Kobayashi in the No. 7 Toyota was faster than Buemi and passed him to return to the lead of the race. The No. 91 Porsche of Makowiecki was elevated to second in LMGTE Pro ahead of the No. 93 of Nick Tandy after a routine sequence of pit stops.[68] Matevos Isaakyan had an anxious moment with a rear suspension failure on the No. 17 SMP BR1 at the entrance to the Porsche Curves. The BR1 speared backwards into a tyre barrier to the outside of the track and sustained heavy damage. Isaakyan was unable to get the car moving and contacted the team via mobile phone for advice on how it could be repaired for return to the pit lane.[69] Marshals pushed the car behind a barrier so that repairs could be made to its rear with the removal of its engine cover. Isaakyan retired after an engine bay fire.[70][71] The retirement of the SMP elevated the Rebellions of Laurent and the recovering Lotterer to third and fourth and Vergne's LMP2-leading No. 26 G-Drive Oreca to fifth overall. Porsche's control on the first three positions in LMGTE Pro was broken after Tandy's No. 93 was forced into the garage with an electrical problem.[70] Early in the tenth hour, the No. 8 Toyota of Buemi incurred a one-minute stop-and-go penalty for speeding in a slow zone, dropping the car two minutes and ten seconds behind the No. 7 of Conway.[72] Philipp Eng's No. 81 BMW relinquished its hold on third place in LMGTE Pro due to a broken damper and lost 11 minutes in the garage.[72][73]

As the race approached its midway point, Alonso lowered the deficit to the race-leading No. 7 Toyota to 1 minute and 16 seconds and Roman Rusinov's No. 26 G-Drive Oreca led by one lap over Lapierre's Singatech Alpine in LMP2. The No. 92 Porsche of Christensen was 1 minute and 53 seconds ahead of Bruni's sister No. 91 in LMGTE Pro by and Andlauer's No. 77 Dempsey-Proton held sway over Bleekemolen's Keating Ferrari in LMGTE Am.[74] During the 13th hour, the No. 3 Rebellion of Menezes was forced into the garage for nine minutes to allow mechanics to repair its underfloor. He ceded third place to Jani's No. 1 car. José Gutiérrez crashed the No. 40 G-Drive Oreca at the exit to the Porsche Curves and ricocheted onto the circuit facing oncoming traffic. Gutiérrez was unhurt; the damage to the car caused its retirement and a local slow zone was enforced.[75] The slow zone increased López's lead over Alonso to two minutes.[76] Soon after the No. 1 Rebellion of Jani came to the pit lane to repair the car's underbody and emerged after a nine-minute pit stop in fourth place, behind the sister No. 3 of Menezes.[77][78] Fisichella was one of the fastest LMGTE Am drivers at the time and brought the Spirit of Race Ferrari into third in class and drew closer to Bleekemolen's car in second.[78]

Morning to early afternoonEdit

In the early morning the No. 7 Toyota of Kobayashi held a stable lead of around ten to twelve seconds over Nakajima's No. 8.[79] Nakajima eliminated the time deficit to retake the lead from Kobayashi at the Mulsanne corner and Buemi later increased the No. 8 Toyota's advantage to more than half a minute with a series of fast lap times.[80] BMW lost one of their two LMGTE Pro entries when Alexander Sims slid on oil laid on the track in the Porsche Curves and damaged the rear of the No. 82 car with a heavy collision against a barrier.[77] At the conclusion of the 16th hour, Cairoli was in fifth in LMGTE Am when he lost control of the No. 88 Dempsey-Proton Porsche due to a suspension failure and crashed into a tyre barrier at the Ford Chicane.[81][82] The car was retired due to the heavy damage sustained to it and a slow zone was enforced in the area.[82] Both of the Toyota cars were observed speeding in the area and incurred separate one-minute stop-and-go penalties though their multi-lap lead over Rebellion kept them in first and second positions. Further down the order, the No. 10 DragonSpeed BR1 had a heavy accident after Hanley lost control of the car in the Porsche Curves and retired.[83] Fifth place in the LMGTE Pro became a battle between the No. 63 Corvette of Mike Rockenfeller and Dixon's No. 69 Ford with the two exchanging position before Dixon returned to the position.[84]

Several LMGTE cars took the opportunity to change brake discs at this point in the morning to ensure that cars would finish the race, including the leading car in LMGTE Pro, the No. 92 Porsche.[84] Antonio García drove the No. 63 Corvette past Ryan Briscoe's No. 69 Ford. He began to gradually draw closer to the No. 68 Ford.[85] Traffic loosened a drain cover built into a kerb at the outside of the Tertre Rouge corner and its metal casting was launched onto a verge. It required the deployment of the safety cars to allow workers to refit the grill and make it safe to drive over.[86] As the safety cars were recalled after half an hour,[87] Alonso fell behind Conway until he overtook him for the lead in slower traffic on the Mulsanne Straight. The LMGTE Pro field closed up with the No. 92 Porsche of Bruni and Müller's No. 68 nose-to-tail for second place in class.[86] Not long after Paul di Resta lost control of the No. 23 United Autosports Ligier in the Porsche Curves and the car's front-left corner made heavy contact with an unprotected concrete barrier. The car slid violently onto the grass and stopped. Di Resta vacated the car unhurt; the was transported to the medical centre for a precautionary check-up and the car was retired.[88] The accident required the intervention of a fourth safety car period. When racing resumed Dempsey-Proton's lead in LMGTE Am was lowered to less than half a minute and Makowiecki fell behind Bourdais and Priaulx to fourth place in LMGTE Pro. The No. 39 Graff Oreca of Vincent Capillaire was able to overhaul François Perrodo's TDS Oreca for fourth in LMP2.[89]

The No. 23 Panis Barthez Ligier of Will Stevens, which had held second place in the LMP2 category, went into the pit lane to have repairs made to its clutch and promoted the No. 36 Signatech Alpine to second in class.[90] López had an anxious moment when he lost control of the No. 7 Toyota at the exit to the Dunlop Curve and lost 16 seconds to the race-leading No. 8 Toyota of Alonso.[91] The IDEC Oreca forfeited second place in LMP2 to the No. 39 Graff of Capillaire due to a cracked gearbox casing that forced its retirement,[92] as Makowiecki and Bourdais exchanged second in LMGTE Pro; Makowiecki was investigated by the stewards for a defensive driving style preventing Bourdais from overtaking him but he avoided a penalty.[91] Ben Keating, whose No. 85 Keating Ferrari held second place in LMGTE Am, lost control of the rear of the car under braking and was beached in a gravel trap at Mulsanne corner. The car relinquished its hold in second place to the Spirit of Race Ferrari and fell one lap behind the class leading No. 77 Dempsey-Proton Porsche.[93] Kobayashi, in second and within 80 minutes of the race finish,[94] missed the entry to the pit lane and Toyota required him to slow to 80 km/h (50 mph) by engaging the full course yellow flag limiter to enable his return to the pit lane.[95] The No. 7 car lost one lap to the No. 8; it incurred two ten-second stop-and-go penalties for exceeding the number of laps permitted for a single stint by a LMP1 hybrid car and its fuel allowance.[96]

FinishEdit

Unhindered in the final hours of the race, Nakajima took the chequered flag for the No. 8 Toyota, which completed 388 laps and was two laps ahead of the No. 7 Toyota of Kobayashi. Rebellion, unable to match the pace of the Toyota cars, finished third and fourth with the No. 3 R13 ahead of the No. 1 car.[96] It was Alonso, Buemi and Nakajima's first Le Mans victory,[97] and Toyota's first in 20th previous attempts.[98] Toyota became the first Japanese manufacturer to win at Le Mans since Mazda in the 1991 edition and Alonso completed a second leg of the Triple Crown of Motorsport (the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Indianapolis 500 and the Monaco Grand Prix).[98] G-Drive Racing led the final 360 laps with the No. 26 Oreca to be the first car to finish the race in LMP2,[99] provisionally earning the team and its drivers Andrea Pizzitola, Rusinov and Vergne their first class victories.[97] Signatech Alpine were the highest-placed full-season World Endurance Championship team in second and Graff Racing completed the class podium.[97] On its 70th anniversary Porsche took its first win in the LMGTE Pro category since the 2013 edition with the No. 92 ahead of the No. 91, and the German marque took the class honours in LMGTE Am with the No. 77 Dempsey-Proton winning with a 1-minute and 39 second gap over the No. 54 Spirit of Race Ferrari.[100] There were 25 lead changes amongst two cars during the race. The No. 7 Toyota's 205 laps led was the most of any car with the race-winning No. 8 leading 13 times for a total of 183 laps.[99]

Post-raceEdit

Obviously it has been a long time dream for me to be there and to experience Le Mans. It's great to have the first opportunity and be in a competitive team as Toyota, to dominate free practice, qualifying and the race. It was a competition between the two of our cars in the garage. In the end we got a little bit more lucky and a little bit more better set up.

Fernando Alonso talking about his maiden experience of the 24 Hours of Le Mans[101]

The top three teams in each of the four classes appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in a later press conference.[20] Alonso revealed that he was worried about the No. 8 Toyota suffering from a mechanical issue preventing him from winning the race, "Right now I'm maybe still in a little bit [of] shock because we were so focused on the race and so stressed at the end watching the television. I'm not used to watching my car racing, I'm normally in it."[102] Nakajima said he believed Toyota deserved to win and believed that the team were calmer than in previous years, "To win this race has been a dream of Toyota’s since 1985, and there are so many guys still here that have been involved in the project so long, I’m so proud to be here to represent them.”[103] Buemi admitted that the one-minute stop-and-go penalty he took made his team uncertain whether they would win but said it was the highlight of his career at the time, "All the preparation that goes behind that day, all of us, all six drivers, we’ve been driving for many days, in the nights, and finally when you win it, it’s something really big."[104]

After all of the non-hybrid cars were unable to challenge the Toyota vehicles, Jani called the race "a procession" and argued the Rebellion R13 lost more than ten seconds per lap to the TS050 Hybrid, "Our spread between our quickest lap and our average is huge, their spread is a lot smaller because they can be flexible with how they overtake cars in a straight line."[105] Lotterer retirated his teammate's view and said he believed the FIA and the ACO would address the issue, "We didn't stand a chance. Let's face it, it was one of the boring editions of the Le Mans 24 Hours. I have to admit that it was difficult to get the most out of every lap. How do you stay motivated?"[106] Oliver Webb agreed with Lotterer and said he felt the following 6 Hours of Silverstone would suit the R13's high-downforce configuration.[106] Frank-Steffen Walliser, the head of Porsche Motorsport, responded to criticism from Bourdais over a perceived view that Makowiecki had inadequate driving standards during their battle for second in LMGTE Pro and felt the comments were invalid, "Firstly, this is not a pony farm; secondly, in my view, it was hard but fair at all times. The scenes when Fred himself was pushed into the grass were not shown on TV. Apart from that - what do you expect when two Frenchmen fight for second place in the biggest French race? Is that supposed to be peace, joy, pancakes? I don't think so!"[107]

During post-race scrutineering, the technical delegates discovered that the LMP2-winning No. 26 G-Drive Oreca and the No. 28 TDS car had modified refuelling rigs in its fuel system assembly that extends to the dead man valve and inside the cone of the fuel restrictor to lessen the time spent in the pit lane, causing the stewards to disqualify the cars.[108] On 21 June, both teams announced an appeal to the penalties was filed with the FIA International Court of Appeal.[109] The tribunal met on 18 September and delayed giving a verdict because the judges on the panel wanted additional time to review the appeal and told the team's lawyers of the outcome.[110] On 2 October, the tribunal heard G-Drive and TDS' appeal. G-Drive argued the modified component was a "commendable technical innovation" and no specific regulation about modifications between the fuel flow restrictor and the dead man's valve had been established. The court upheld the stewards' decision by deeming the introduction of an additional component protruding the fuel flow restrictor a regulation transgression. The No. 36 Singatech Alpine took the win in LMP2, the No. 39 Graff Oreca was second and the No. 32 United Autosports Ligier completed the class podium in third.[111]

The result increased Alonso, Buemi and Nakajima's lead in the LMP Drivers' Championship to 20 points over their teammates Conway, Kobayashi and López in second. Beche, Laurent and Menezes remained in third place. Lapierre, André Negrão and Thiriet's victory in LMP2 moved them from seventh to fourth and Jani, Lotterer and Senna completed the top five.[7] Christensen and Estre took the lead of the GTE Drivers Championship from Johnson, Mücke and Pla. Bruni and Lietz were in third position.[7] Toyota further extended their advantage over Rebellion in the LMP1 Teams' Championship to 27 points while ByKolles and SMP Racing retained third and fourth.[7] Porsche progressed further away from Ford by 44 points in the GTE Manufacturers' Championship and Ferrari maintained third place with six races remaining in the season.[7]

Race classificationEdit

The minimum number of laps for classification (70% of the overall winning car's race distance) was 272 laps. Class winners are in bold and .[112]

Pos Class No Team Drivers Chassis Tyre Laps Time
Engine
1 LMP1 8   Toyota Gazoo Racing   Sébastien Buemi
  Kazuki Nakajima
  Fernando Alonso
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 388 24:00.52.247
Toyota 2.4 L Turbo V6
2 LMP1 7   Toyota Gazoo Racing   Mike Conway
  Kamui Kobayashi
  José María López
Toyota TS050 Hybrid M 386 +2 Laps
Toyota 2.4 L Turbo V6
3 LMP1 3   Rebellion Racing   Thomas Laurent
  Gustavo Menezes
  Mathias Beche
Rebellion R13 M 376 +12 Laps
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
4 LMP1 1   Rebellion Racing   Bruno Senna
  André Lotterer
  Neel Jani
Rebellion R13 M 375 +13 Laps
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
5 LMP2 36   Signatech Alpine Matmut   Nicolas Lapierre
  Pierre Thiriet
  André Negrão
Alpine A470 D 367 +21 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
6 LMP2 39   Graff-SO24   Vincent Capillaire
  Jonathan Hirschi
  Tristan Gommendy
Oreca 07 D 366 +22 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
7 LMP2 32   United Autosports   Hugo de Sadeleer
  Will Owen
  Juan Pablo Montoya
Ligier JS P217 D 365 +23 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
8 LMP2 37   Jackie Chan DC Racing   Jazeman Jaafar
  Weiron Tan
  Nabil Jeffri
Oreca 07 D 361 +27 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
9 LMP2 31   DragonSpeed   Roberto González
  Pastor Maldonado
  Nathanaël Berthon
Oreca 07 M 360 +28 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
10 LMP2 38   Jackie Chan DC Racing   Ho-Pin Tung
  Gabriel Aubry
  Stéphane Richelmi
Oreca 07 D 356 +32 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
11 LMP2 29   Racing Team Nederland   Giedo van der Garde
  Jan Lammers
  Frits van Eerd
Dallara P217 M 356 +32 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
12 LMP2 33   Jackie Chan DC Racing   David Cheng
  Nicholas Boulle
  Jacques Nicolet
Ligier JS P217 D 355 +33 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
13 LMP2 23   Panis Barthez Competition   Julien Canal
  Thimothé Buret
  Will Stevens
Ligier JS P217 M 352 +36 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
14 LMP2 35   SMP Racing   Viktor Shaytar
  Harrison Newey
  Norman Nato
Dallara P217 D 345 +43 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
15 LMGTE
Pro
92   Porsche GT Team   Michael Christensen
  Kévin Estre
  Laurens Vanthoor
Porsche 911 RSR M 344 +44 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
16 LMGTE
Pro
91   Porsche GT Team   Richard Lietz
  Gianmaria Bruni
  Frédéric Makowiecki
Porsche 911 RSR M 343 +45 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
17 LMGTE
Pro
68   Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA   Joey Hand
  Dirk Müller
  Sébastien Bourdais
Ford GT M 343 +45 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
18 LMGTE
Pro
63   Corvette Racing – GM   Jan Magnussen
  Antonio García
  Mike Rockenfeller
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 342 +46 Laps
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
19 LMP2 47   Cetilar Villorba Corse   Roberto Lacorte
  Giorgio Sernagiotto
  Felipe Nasr
Dallara P217 D 342 +46 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
20 LMGTE
Pro
52   AF Corse   Toni Vilander
  Pipo Derani
  Antonio Giovinazzi
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 341 +47 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
21 LMGTE
Pro
66   Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK   Stefan Mücke
  Olivier Pla
  Billy Johnson
Ford GT M 340 +48 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
22 LMGTE
Pro
51   AF Corse   James Calado
  Alessandro Pier Guidi
  Daniel Serra
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 339 +49 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
23 LMGTE
Pro
95   Aston Martin Racing   Nicki Thiim
  Marco Sørensen
  Darren Turner
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 339 +49 Laps
Aston Martin 4.0 L Turbo V8
24 LMGTE
Pro
71   AF Corse   Davide Rigon
  Sam Bird
  Miguel Molina
Ferrari 488 GTE Evo M 338 +50 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
25 LMGTE
Am
77   Dempsey-Proton Racing   Matt Campbell
  Christian Ried
  Julien Andlauer
Porsche 911 RSR M 335 +53 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
26 LMGTE
Am
54   Spirit of Race   Thomas Flohr
  Francesco Castellacci
  Giancarlo Fisichella
Ferrari 488 GTE M 335 +53 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
27 LMGTE
Pro
93   Porsche GT Team   Patrick Pilet
  Nick Tandy
  Earl Bamber
Porsche 911 RSR M 334 +54 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
28 LMGTE
Am
85   Keating Motorsports   Ben Keating
  Jeroen Bleekemolen
  Luca Stolz
Ferrari 488 GTE M 334 +54 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
29 LMGTE
Am
99   Proton Competition   Patrick Long
  Tim Pappas
  Spencer Pumpelly
Porsche 911 RSR M 334 +54 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
30 LMGTE
Am
84   JMW Motorsport   Liam Griffin
  Cooper MacNeil
  Jeff Segal
Ferrari 488 GTE M 332 +56 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
31 LMGTE
Am
80   Ebimotors   Fabio Babini
  Christina Nielsen
  Erik Maris
Porsche 911 RSR M 332 +56 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
32 LMP2 50   Larbre Compétition   Erwin Creed
  Romano Ricci
  Thomas Dagoneau
Ligier JS P217 M 332 +56 Laps
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
33 LMGTE
Pro
81   BMW Team MTEK   Nick Catsburg
  Martin Tomczyk
  Philipp Eng
BMW M8 GTE M 332 +56 Laps
BMW S63 4.0 L Turbo V8
34 LMGTE
Am
56   Team Project 1   Jörg Bergmeister
  Patrick Lindsey
  Egidio Perfetti
Porsche 911 RSR M 332 +56 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
35 LMGTE
Am
61   Clearwater Racing   Matt Griffin
  Weng Sun Mok
  Keita Sawa
Ferrari 488 GTE M 332 +56 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
36 LMGTE
Pro
67   Ford Chip Ganassi Team UK   Harry Tincknell
  Andy Priaulx
  Tony Kanaan
Ford GT M 332[N 1] +56 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
37 LMGTE
Pro
97   Aston Martin Racing   Alex Lynn
  Jonathan Adam
  Maxime Martin
Aston Martin Vantage AMR M 327 +61 Laps
Aston Martin 4.0 L Turbo V8
38 LMGTE
Am
70   MR Racing   Olivier Beretta
  Eddie Cheever III
  Motoaki Ishikawa
Ferrari 488 GTE M 324 +64 Laps
Ferrari F154CB 3.9 L Turbo V8
39 LMGTE
Pro
69   Ford Chip Ganassi Team USA   Ryan Briscoe
  Richard Westbrook
  Scott Dixon
Ford GT M 309[N 2] +79 Laps
Ford EcoBoost 3.5 L Turbo V6
40 LMGTE
Am
86   Gulf Racing   Michael Wainwright
  Ben Barker
  Alex Davison
Porsche 911 RSR M 283 +105 Laps
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
41 LMP1 5   CEFC TRSM Racing   Charlie Robertson
  Michael Simpson
  Léo Roussel
Ginetta G60-LT-P1 M 283[N 3] +105 Laps
Mecachrome V634P1 3.4 L Turbo V6
NC[N 4] LMP2 44   Eurasia Motorsport   Andrea Bertolini
  Niclas Jönsson
  Tracy Krohn
Ligier JS P217 D 334 Not classified
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMP1 11   SMP Racing   Mikhail Aleshin
  Vitaly Petrov
  Jenson Button
BR Engineering BR1 M 315 Engine
AER P60B 2.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP2 48   IDEC Sport   Paul Lafargue
  Paul-Loup Chatin
  Memo Rojas
Oreca 07 M 312 Gearbox
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
90   TF Sport   Euan Hankey
  Charlie Eastwood
  Salih Yoluç
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE M 304 Driveshaft
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 22   United Autosports   Phil Hanson
  Paul di Resta
  Filipe Albuquerque
Ligier JS P217 D 288 Crash
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Pro
64   Corvette Racing – GM   Oliver Gavin
  Tommy Milner
  Marcel Fässler
Chevrolet Corvette C7.R M 259 Overheating
Chevrolet 5.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 10   DragonSpeed   Ben Hanley
  Henrik Hedman
  Renger van der Zande
BR Engineering BR1 M 244 Crash
Gibson GL458 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP2 25   Algarve Pro Racing   Mark Patterson
  Ate de Jong
  Tacksung Kim
Ligier JS P217 D 237 Gearbox
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMGTE
Am
88   Dempsey-Proton Racing   Khaled Al Qubaisi
  Matteo Cairoli
  Giorgio Roda
Porsche 911 RSR M 225 Suspension
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMGTE
Pro
82   BMW Team MTEK   António Félix da Costa
  Alexander Sims
  Augusto Farfus
BMW M8 GTE M 223 Damage
BMW S63 4.0 L Turbo V8
DNF LMP2 40   G-Drive Racing   James Allen
  José Gutiérrez
  Enzo Guibbert
Oreca 07 D 197 Crash
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMP2 34   Jackie Chan DC Racing   Ricky Taylor
  Côme Ledogar
  David Heinemeier Hansson
Ligier JS P217 D 195 Engine
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DNF LMP1 6   CEFC TRSM Racing   Oliver Rowland
  Alex Brundle
  Oliver Turvey
Ginetta G60-LT-P1 M 137 Electrical
Mecachrome V634P1 3.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMP1 17   SMP Racing   Stéphane Sarrazin
  Matevos Isaakyan
  Egor Orudzhev
BR Engineering BR1 M 123 Crash
AER P60B 2.4 L Turbo V6
DNF LMGTE
Pro
94   Porsche GT Team   Romain Dumas
  Timo Bernhard
  Sven Müller
Porsche 911 RSR M 92 Suspension
Porsche 4.0 L Flat-6
DNF LMGTE
Am
98   Aston Martin Racing   Paul Dalla Lana
  Mathias Lauda
  Pedro Lamy
Aston Martin V8 Vantage GTE M 92 Crash
Aston Martin 4.5 L V8
DNF LMP1 4   ByKolles Racing Team   Oliver Webb
  Tom Dillmann
  Dominik Kraihamer
ENSO CLM P1/01 M 65 Collision
Nismo VRX30A 3.0 L Turbo V6
DSQ[N 5] LMP2 26   G-Drive Racing   Roman Rusinov
  Andrea Pizzitola
  Jean-Éric Vergne
Oreca 07 D 369 Disqualified
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8
DSQ[N 5] LMP2 28   TDS Racing   François Perrodo
  Loïc Duval
  Matthieu Vaxivière
Oreca 07 D 365[N 6] Disqualified
Gibson GK428 4.2 L V8

Notes

  1. ^ The No. 67 Ford was penalised 11 laps and 1:23.499 by the stewards following the race because Tony Kanaan did not meet the minimum overall drive time of six hours.[113]
  2. ^ The No. 69 Ford was penalised 2 laps and 1:42.968 by the stewards following the race because Scott Dixon did not meet the minimum overall drive time of six hours.[113]
  3. ^ The No. 5 Ginetta was penalised 6 laps and 2:45.613 by the stewards following the race because Léo Roussel did not meet the minimum overall drive time of six hours.[113]
  4. ^ The No. 44 Eurasia Ligier was not classified as a finisher for failing to complete the final lap of the race.[112]
  5. ^ a b The No. 26 G-Drive and No. 28 TDS Orecas, both under the operation of TDS Racing, were disqualified from the race after it was found that the team had illegally modified their refueling equipment in order to fuel both cars quicker than regulations allowed.[108]
  6. ^ Prior to the disqualification, the No. 28 TDS Oreca was penalised 1 lap and 1:18.188 by the stewards following the race because driver François Perrodo exceeded his maximum drive time of four hours within a six hour period.[113]

Championship standings after the raceEdit

  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for Drivers' Championship standings.
  • Note: Only the top five positions are included for the Drivers' Championship standings.

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External linksEdit